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Events Calendar



Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars
Events for October

  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Oct 01, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Lin Ma, Associate Professor in Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

    Talk Title: High Speed and Multidimensional Combustion Diagnostics

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Abstract: This talk describes our efforts to enable high speed and multidimensional measurements in turbulent combustion systems, which have been long desired for resolving the inherent three-dimensional spatial features and temporal dynamics of turbulent flames. This talk uses several examples to introduce our recent work on multidimensional diagnostics using tomography, and to discuss the unique opportunities that they can enable. Examples include the multidimensional measurements of mixture fraction, temperature fields, chemical species distribution, and instantaneous 3D flame topography. Combined with ruggedized hardware and robust data analyzing algorithms, such measurements have been successfully demonstrated in both laboratory flames and also practical combustion systems including a model scramjet combustor.

    Biography: Lin Ma worked as a graduate research assistant from 2000-2006 in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory (HTGL) at Stanford University. He started his faculty career in 2006 after completing his PhD work, focusing on multidimensional laser diagnostics. His work on 2D mixture fraction measurement was recognized by the National Science Foundation with a CAREER award. He is also active in teaching and professional services. His teaching and research efforts were recognized by a Board of Trustee Award, and he is an active member of several professional organizations and technical committees.

    Host: Professor Paul Ronney

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • Chemistry Department Colloquium: “Pushing Block Copolymer Self-Assembly to its (sub-10 nm) Limits"

    Thu, Oct 02, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 05:50 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Professor Jillian Buriak, Department of Chemistry and the National Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Alberta, Edmonton

    Talk Title: Pushing Block Copolymer Self-Assembly to its (sub-10 nm) Limits

    Abstract: Self-assembled nanostructures continue to be the focus of intense research due to their obvious inspiration from
    Nature, and secondly, their enormous utility for patterning nanoscale structures with little outside intervention.
    The directed self-assembly of block copolymers is a widely studied example that has great potential for
    producing a broad array of regular and intricate nanostructures with only a small degree of external guidance, or
    none at all. Thin layers of block copolymers can be induced to self-assemble to form very detailed patterns on
    surfaces, and in this context, they can be used a template for directing surface chemistry on a range of different
    technologically relevant interfaces. The spatially defined surface chemistry that can be accomplished, using the
    nanoscale direction from the block copolymers, ranges from metallization, to metal oxide formation, to the
    covalent attachment of small molecules, to highly controlled anisotropic surface etching. There remain,
    however, many problems, many of which are defined by the International Technology Roadmap for
    Semiconductors (www.itrs.net), with regards to block copolymer-mediated directed self-assembly. Being able to
    produce sub-10 nm features, with very low line edge roughness in a rapid fashion, accompanied by very low
    error rates is both challenging and fascinating. In this seminar, we will outline current approaches towards the
    use of self-assembled block copolymer nanostructures on technologically relevant semiconductor materials, to
    produce complex sub 10-nm features. Various routes towards accessing unexpected and useful structures will be
    discussed, along with quantification of error rates and defect densities; in many cases these structures are
    substantially smaller than what would be expected, based upon the natural periods and spacings of a given block
    copolymer. Conversion of these block copolymer nanostructures into functional metal and metal oxide
    nanopatterns will be described.

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 123

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Ryan Choi

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  • W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Colloquium

    Fri, Oct 03, 2014 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Devon Shay, Director of Engineering & Geosciences, Signal Hill Petroleum

    Talk Title: Old Oil Fields in the LA Basin

    Host: W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Program

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Jeffrey Teng

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  • NL Seminar- Getting Good at Research

    Fri, Oct 03, 2014 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Kevin Knight, USC/ISI

    Talk Title: Getting Good at Research

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: If you do good research, you'll find that many doors open. I'll offer some suggest for how to make that happen. This should be an interactive session.


    Biography: Kevin Knight is the director of the ISI Natural Language group, a professor of Computer Science at USC, and an ISI Fellow.

    Host: Aliya Deri

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Oct 06, 2014 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Ellis Meng, Keyue Shen, Francisco Valero-Cuevas, David D'Argenio, Meng (Professor, BME), Keyue Shen (Assistant Professor, BME), Francisco Valero-Cuevas (Professor, BME & Biokinesiology), David D'Argenio (Professor, BME)

    Talk Title: BME Research Presentations

    Abstract: Ellis Meng (12:30-12:45)Talk Title: TBA
    Keyue Shen (12:50-1:05)Talk Title: TBA
    Francisco Valero-Cuevas (1:10-1:25)Talk Title: TBA
    David D'Argenio (1:30-1:45)Talk Title: TBA

    Host: Stanley Yamashiro

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Green Belt for Process Improvement

    Tue, Oct 07, 2014

    Distance Education Network

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Abstract: Learn how to integrate principles of business, statistics and engineering to achieve tangible results. Master the use of Six Sigma to quantify the critical quality issues in your company. Once the issues have been quantified, statistics can be applied to provide probabilities of success and failure. Six Sigma methods increase productivity and enhance quality. As a Six Sigma green belt, you will be equipped to support and champion a Six Sigma implementation in your organization. To earn the Six Sigma Green Belt Certificate, you will be required to pass the Institute of Industrial Engineer's green belt exam (administered on the final day of the course).

    Register Now

    Host: Professional Programs

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

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    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

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  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Green Belt for Process Improvement

    Wed, Oct 08, 2014

    Distance Education Network

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Abstract: Learn how to integrate principles of business, statistics and engineering to achieve tangible results. Master the use of Six Sigma to quantify the critical quality issues in your company. Once the issues have been quantified, statistics can be applied to provide probabilities of success and failure. Six Sigma methods increase productivity and enhance quality. As a Six Sigma green belt, you will be equipped to support and champion a Six Sigma implementation in your organization. To earn the Six Sigma Green Belt Certificate, you will be required to pass the Institute of Industrial Engineer's green belt exam (administered on the final day of the course).

    Register Now

    Host: Professional Programs

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

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    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

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  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Oct 08, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Anirban Guha, Postdoctoral Fellow in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

    Talk Title: On the Connection between Wave Resonance, Shear Instability and Oscillator Synchronization

    Abstract: Homlboe (Geophys. Publ., vol. 24, 1962, pp. 7-112) postulated that interaction between two or more progressive, linear interfacial waves produces exponentially growing instabilities in idealized (broke-line profiles), homogeneous or density-stratified, inviscid shear layers. We have generalized Holmboe's mechanistic picture of linear shear instabilities by (i) not initially specifying the wave type, and (ii) providing the option for non-normal growth. We have demonstrated the mechanism behind linear shear instabilities by proposing a purely kinematic model consisting of two linear, Doppler-shifted, progressive interfacial waves moving in opposite directions. Moreover, we have found a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of exponentially growing instabilities in idealized shear forms. The two interfacial waves, starting from arbitrary initial conditions, eventually phase-lock and resonate (grow exponentially), provided the necessary and sufficient condition in satisfied. The theoretical underpinning of our wave interaction model is analogous to that of synchronization between two coupled harmonic oscillators. We have re-framed our model into a nonlinear autonomous dynamical system, the steady-state configuration of which corresponds to the resonant configuration of the wave interaction model. When interpreted in terms of the canonical normal-mode theory, the steady-state/resonant configuration corresponds to the growing normal mode of the discrete spectrum. The instability mechanism occurring prior to reaching steady state is non-modal, favoring rapid transient growth. Depending on the wavenumber and initial phase-shift, non-modal gain can exceed the corresponding modal gain by many orders of magnitude. Instability is also observed in the parameter space, which is deemed stable by the normal-mode theory. Using our model we have derived the discrete spectrum non-modal stability equations for three classical examples of shear instabilities: Rayleigh/Kelvin-Helmholtz, Holmboe and Taylor-Caulfield. We have shown that the necessary and sufficient condition provides a range of unstable wave numbers for each instability type, and this range matched the predictions of normal-mode theory.

    Biography: Anirban Guha is currently a Postdoctoral fellow in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at UCLA. He is particularly interested in stratified shear instabilities, Rossby and gravity waves, vortices, and flow over topography. Dr. Guha obtained an Undergraduate Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Jadavpur University, India, and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from The University of British Columbia, Canada. He received various awards during his Ph.D. studies at UBC - the Four year fellowship, the Earl R. Peterson memorial scholarship, and the Faculty of applied science graduate award. Dr. Guha was also the 2013 recipient of the prestigious David Crighton Fellowship from DAMTP, University of Cambridge.

    Host: Professor Paul Ronney

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Green Belt for Process Improvement

    Thu, Oct 09, 2014

    Distance Education Network

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Abstract: Learn how to integrate principles of business, statistics and engineering to achieve tangible results. Master the use of Six Sigma to quantify the critical quality issues in your company. Once the issues have been quantified, statistics can be applied to provide probabilities of success and failure. Six Sigma methods increase productivity and enhance quality. As a Six Sigma green belt, you will be equipped to support and champion a Six Sigma implementation in your organization. To earn the Six Sigma Green Belt Certificate, you will be required to pass the Institute of Industrial Engineer's green belt exam (administered on the final day of the course).

    Register Now

    Host: Professional Programs

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

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    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

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  • W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Colloquium

    Fri, Oct 10, 2014 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Ed Ebrahimian, Director of the Bureau of Street Lighting of the City of Los Angeles

    Talk Title: LA's Leadership in LED Street Lighting

    Host: W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Program

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Jeffrey Teng

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  • Munushian Seminar - Keynote Lecture

    Fri, Oct 10, 2014 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: David Wineland, NIST Time and Frequency Division, Boulder, CO

    Talk Title: Quantum Computers and Raising Schrödinger’s Cat

    Abstract: Quantum systems such as atoms can be used to store information. For example, we can store binary information in two energy levels of an atom by labeling the state with lower energy a “0” and the state with higher energy a “1.” However, quantum systems can also exist in superposition states, thereby storing both states of the bit simultaneously, a situation that makes no sense in our ordinary-day experience. This property of quantum bits or “qubits” potentially leads to an exponential increase in memory and processing capacity. It would enable a quantum computer to efficiently solve certain problems such as factorizing large numbers - an ability that could compromise the security of current encryption systems. A quantum computer would also realize an analog of “Schrödinger’s Cat,” a bizarre situation where a cat could be simultaneously dead and alive. Experiments whose goal is to realize a quantum computer based on laser manipulations of atomic ions will be described.

    Biography: David J. Wineland (born 1944) is an American physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) physics laboratory in Boulder. His work has included advances in optics, specifically laser cooling of ions in Paul traps and use of trapped ions to implement quantum computing operations. Wineland received his bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley in 1965 and his PhD in 1970 working under Norman Ramsey at Harvard University. He then worked as a postdoc in Hans Dehmelt’s group at the University of Washington before joining the National Bureau of Standards in 1975 where he started the ion storage group, now at NIST, Boulder. Wineland is a fellow of the American Physical society, the American Optical society, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1992. He was the recipient of the 1990 Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics, the 1990 William F. Meggers Award of the Optical Society of America, the 1996 Einstein Medal for Laser Science of the Society
    of Optical and Quantum electronics, the 1998 Rabi Award from the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics,
    and Frequency Control Society, the 2001 Arthur L. Schawlow Prize in Laser. He is an American Nobel-Prize-winning physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) physics laboratory. His work has included advances in optics, specifically laser cooling of ions in Paul traps and use of trapped ions to implement quantum computing operations. He was awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics, jointly with Serge Haroche, for “ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems.”

    Host: EE-Electrophysics

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 124

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

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  • Astani CEE Ph.D. Seminar

    Fri, Oct 10, 2014 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Todd Oliver, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at UT-Austin

    Talk Title: A Framework for Validating Predictions of Unobserved Quantities with Applicatons from Turbulent Flow Similation

    Abstract:
    In applied science and engineering, computational models are commonly used to make predictions of quantities that are not experimentally observable. Assessing the validity of such predictions, which are fundamentally extrapolations, is challenging but critical. In classical approaches to validation, model outputs for observed quantities are compared to observations to determine if they are consistent. By itself, this consistency only ensures that the model can predict the observed quantities under the conditions of the observations. This limitation dramatically reduces the utility of the
    validation effort for decision making because it implies nothing about predictions of unobserved QoIs or for scenarios outside of the range of observations.

    This talk will describe a process for validation of extrapolative predictions for models with known sources of error. The process includes stochastic modeling, calibration, validation, and predictive assessment phases where representations of known sources of uncertainty and error are built, informed, and tested. The methodology is applied to a simple spring-mass-damper system to illustrate the process in the simplest possible setting. Finally, some aspects of the process, including calibration and stochastic modeling, are discussed in the context of RANS turbulence modeling.





    Biography:

    Todd Oliver is a research associate with the Center for Predictive Engineering and Computational Sciences (PECOS) at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at UT-Austin. Dr. Oliver's expertise is in the broad area of computational fluid dynamics with specific focus on statistical methods for the validation of models and predictions. At PECOS he developed predictive tools for the analysis and design of re-entry vehicles.


    Host: Dr. Roger Ghanem

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Oct 13, 2014 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Pramode Butte, Ph.D., Asst. Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles

    Talk Title: TBA

    Host: Michael Khoo

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • CS Colloquium - USC Student Series: George Konstantinidis, Leandro Soriano Marcolino

    Tue, Oct 14, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 05:30 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: George Konstantinidis; Leandro Soriano Marcolino, USC

    Talk Title: Scalable Data Integration under Constraints, Agents Vote for the Environment: Designing Energy-Efficient Architecture

    Series: Student Seminar Series

    Abstract: Coming Soon

    Biography: Coming Soon

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Astani Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Tue, Oct 14, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Kai Loon Chen, Johns Hopkins University

    Talk Title: Interactions of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials with Model Cell Membranes: Implications for Nanotoxicity

    Host: Dr. Amy Childress

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 200

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Oct 15, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Paul Newton, Professor of Applied Mathematics in Department of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering at University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

    Talk Title: Random Walks, Markov Chains, and Cancer Progression Models from Longitudinal and Autopsy Data

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Abstract: We will describe models of metastatic cancer progression using Markov chain modeling on a directed graph of nodes that are the various anatomical sites where metastatic tumors can form for a given type of primary cancer. We use metastatic tumor distributions gathered from historical autopsy data, as well as current longitudinal data sets to estimate the transition probabilities (stochastic parameters) from site to site. This creates a systemic network diagram from which we can calculate reduced two-step diagrams using the fact that the systems converge to their steady-state distribution after roughly two steps. The diagrams are used to categorize metastatic sites as `sponges' or `spreaders', as well as to run hypothetical therapeutic scenarios based on Monte Carlo simulations of progression with mean first-passage times as a surrogate timescale measure. A useful metric which we describe is the notion of metastatic entropy and how is correlates with graph conductance dictating Markov convergence rates, mixing times, and complexity. If time permits, we will describe a more fine-scale cell based model which is driven by a stochastic Moran process acting on a heterogeneous population of cells trafficking across the directed graph to various sites, governed by a fitness landscape, with simple point-mutations, interacting via the prisoner’s dilemma paradigm in which the cancer cells are the `defectors’ and the healthy cells are the `cooperators'.

    Biography: Paul Newton received his B.S. in Applied Math/Physics at Harvard University and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Brown University. After a post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford University, he was Assistant and Associate Professor of Mathematics and The Center for Complex Systems Research at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. He has held visiting appointments at Caltech, Brown, Hokkaido University, The Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at U.C. Santa Barbara, and The Scripps Research Institute. He is currently Professor of Applied Math, Engineering, and Medicine in the Viterbi School of Engineering and the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Southern California. He serves as Managing Editor of The Journal of Nonlinear Science, Advisor on Texts in Applied Mathematics Series, Springer-Verlag, New York, and is on The Center Advisory Committee for The Physical Sciences Oncology Center at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, CA where he serves as Project Leader, Mathematical Modeling: Physics and Mathematics of Cancer Metastasis.

    Host: Professor Paul Ronney

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Colloquium

    Fri, Oct 17, 2014 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Jeff Lamb, Orange Empire Railway Museum

    Talk Title: Steam Locomotives: Past and Future

    Host: W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Program

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Jeffrey Teng

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Oct 20, 2014 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Janet Oldak, MSc., Ph.D., Professor of Dentistry, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology, USC Ostrow School of Dentistry

    Talk Title: TBA

    Host: Norberto Grzywacz

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Seminars in Engineering, Neuroscience & Health (ENH)

    Mon, Oct 20, 2014 @ 03:50 PM - 04:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Veronica Santos, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: Seminars in Engineering, Neuroscience & Health (ENH)

    Biography: http://www.mae.ucla.edu/people/faculty/veronica-santos
    Host: Francisco Valero-Cuevas, Charles Liu, Christianne Heck

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 100D

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Oct 22, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Kevin Chen, Viterbi Fellow in Department of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

    Talk Title: Vortex Breakdown, Instability, and Sensitivity of a T-Junction Flow

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Abstract: The fluid flow through a T-shaped pipe bifurcation (with the inlet at the bottom of the "T") is a very familiar occurrence in both natural and man-made systems. Everyday examples include industrial pipe networks, microfluidic channels, and blood flows near the heart and brain. Yet, many questions about the flow physics remain, and prior analyses have been rudimentary. This seminar addresses three important questions: 1) How does the flow evolve with Reynolds number? 2) What are the important flow structures? 3) Lastly, where in the flow do the stability eigenvalues exhibit high sensitivity to dynamical perturbations? Much of this research focuses on the relation between vortex breakdown in the outlet pipes and the regions of stability, receptivity, and sensitivity as defined by linear global stability theory. The vortex breakdown, which occurs above a Reynolds number of 320, gives rise to recirculation regions near the junction; a supercritical Hopf bifurcation first occurs at a Reynolds number of 556. Regions of growth are concentrated in the outlet pipes, but regions of receptivity to initial conditions and external disturbances are confined to small regions near the walls of the inlet and junction. Finally, the flow is most sensitive to localized feedback and to base flow modifications in the recirculation regions, which we explain using an inviscid Lagrangian short-wavelength theory. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most complicated flow for which anyone has observed the relation between sensitivity and recirculation.

    Biography: Kevin Chen is presently a Viterbi Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Southern California, in the Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering department. He attended Caltech as an Axline Scholar, where he received a B.S. with Honor in Engineering and Applied Science, with a focus in Aeronautics, in 2009. At Caltech, he conducted research in experimental and computational fluid dynamics with Mory Gharib, Beverley McKeon, and Tim Colonius. He attended Princeton University as a Gordon Y. S. Wu fellow, where he received an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in 2011 and 2014, respectively, under the advising of Clancy Rowley and Howard Stone. He has received support from the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship, the DOD NDSEG and NSF GRFP fellowships, and awards from Caltech and Princeton University. Kevin's primary research interest is the development of feedback flow control, where fluid mechanics intersect with modern control theory, stability theory, dynamical systems, and computational methods.

    Host: Professor Paul Ronney

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • MFD - Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Distinguished Lecture: Karsen Thompson (LSU)

    Thu, Oct 23, 2014 @ 12:45 PM - 02:00 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Karsen Thompson, Louisiana State University, Petroleum Engineering

    Talk Title: Using Image-based pore-scale modeling in reservoir simulation

    Series: Distinguished Lectures

    Abstract: TBA

    Host: Prof. Jessen

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Ryan Choi

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  • W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Colloquium

    Fri, Oct 24, 2014 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Junbing Yang, Ph.D., Chief Technology Officer, California Lithium Battery

    Talk Title: Silicon Anodes for Lithium Batteries

    Host: W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Program

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Jeffrey Teng

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  • Integrated Seminar Series

    Fri, Oct 24, 2014 @ 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Goutam Chattopadhyay, JPL

    Talk Title: Terahertz Technology and its Applications

    Abstract: For more than last forty years, terahertz components and instruments have primarily been developed for space science applications in radio astronomy and planetary sciences. However, in recent years, terahertz waves are increasingly being used in commercial applications such as high speed communications, security imaging, autonomous landing and refueling of airplanes, and medicines. In spite of all these fascinating scientific and commercial potential, the terahertz frequency range (loosely defined as 300 GHz < ν < 10 THz) still remains one of the least utilized electromagnetic bands because of the unavailability of commercial source and sensor components, and sub-systems.

    Recent progress in CMOS technology as well as availability of InP HEMT based amplifiers in terahertz frequency band has caught the imagination of researchers for developing terahertz instruments for commercial applications. Rapid progress in multiple fronts, such as commercial software for component and device modeling, low-loss waveguide circuits and interconnect technologies, silicon micromachining for highly integrated and compact packaging, and submicron scale lithographic techniques, is making it an exciting time for terahertz engineers and scientists.

    In this presentation, an overview of the state of the terahertz technology will be presented. The talk will detail the science and other applications that specifically require technology at terahertz frequencies. The challenges of the future generation instruments and detectors at these frequencies in addressing the needs for critical scientific and commercial applications will also be discussed.

    The research described herein was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA, under contract with National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

    Biography: Goutam Chattopadhyay (S’93-M’99-SM’01-F’11) is a Principal Engineer/Scientist at the NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and a Visiting Professor at the Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA. He received the B.E. degree in electronics and telecommunication engineering from the Bengal Engineering College, Calcutta University, Calcutta, India, in 1987, the M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, in 1994, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, in 1999. From 1987 until 1992, he was a Design Engineer with the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research.

    His research interests include microwave, millimeter- and submillimeter- wave heterodyne and direct detector receivers, frequency sources and mixers in the terahertz region, antennas, SIS mixer technology, direct detector bolometer instruments; InP HEMT amplifiers, mixers, and multipliers; high frequency radars, and applications of nanotechnology at terahertz frequencies. He has more than 200 publications in international journals and conferences and holds several patents. Among various awards and honors, he was the recipient of the Best Undergraduate Student Award from the University of Calcutta in 1987, the Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowship Award from the Government of India in 1992, and the IEEE MTT-S Graduate Fellowship Award in 1997. He was the recipient of the best journal paper award in 2013 by IEEE Transactions on Terahertz Science and Technology. He also received more than 30 NASA technical achievement and new technology invention awards. He is a Fellow of IEEE and IEEE.



    Hosted by Prof. Hossein Hashemi, Prof. Mike Chen and Prof. Mahta Moghaddam

    Organized and hosted by Masashi Yamagata

    For questions or additional details, please email myamagat@usc.edu

    Host: Hosted by Prof. Hossein Hashemi, Prof. Mike Chen, Prof. Mahta Moghaddam, and Masashi Yamagata

    More Info: http://mhi.usc.edu/events/event-details/?event_id=910780

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Elise Herrera-Green

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  • Integrated Seminar Series

    Fri, Oct 24, 2014 @ 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Goutam Chattopadhyay, JPL

    Talk Title: Terahertz Technology and its Applications

    Abstract: For more than last forty years, terahertz components and instruments have primarily been developed for space science applications in radio astronomy and planetary sciences. However, in recent years, terahertz waves are increasingly being used in commercial applications such as high speed communications, security imaging, autonomous landing and refueling of airplanes, and medicines. In spite of all these fascinating scientific and commercial potential, the terahertz frequency range still remains one of the least utilized electromagnetic bands because of the unavailability of commercial source and sensor components, and sub-systems.

    Recent progress in CMOS technology as well as availability of InP HEMT based amplifiers in terahertz frequency band has caught the imagination of researchers for developing terahertz instruments for commercial applications. Rapid progress in multiple fronts, such as commercial software for component and device modeling, low-loss waveguide circuits and interconnect technologies, silicon micromachining for highly integrated and compact packaging, and submicron scale lithographic techniques, is making it an exciting time for terahertz engineers and scientists.

    In this presentation, an overview of the state of the terahertz technology will be presented. The talk will detail the science and other applications that specifically require technology at terahertz frequencies. The challenges of the future generation instruments and detectors at these frequencies in addressing the needs for critical scientific and commercial applications will also be discussed.

    The research described herein was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA, under contract with National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

    Biography: Goutam Chattopadhyay (S’93-M’99-SM’01-F’11) is a Principal Engineer/Scientist at the NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and a Visiting Professor at the Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA. He received the B.E. degree in electronics and telecommunication engineering from the Bengal Engineering College, Calcutta University, Calcutta, India, in 1987, the M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, in 1994, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, in 1999. From 1987 until 1992, he was a Design Engineer with the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research.

    His research interests include microwave, millimeter- and submillimeter- wave heterodyne and direct detector receivers, frequency sources and mixers in the terahertz region, antennas, SIS mixer technology, direct detector bolometer instruments; InP HEMT amplifiers, mixers, and multipliers; high frequency radars, and applications of nanotechnology at terahertz frequencies. He has more than 200 publications in international journals and conferences and holds several patents. Among various awards and honors, he was the recipient of the Best Undergraduate Student Award from the University of Calcutta in 1987, the Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowship Award from the Government of India in 1992, and the IEEE MTT-S Graduate Fellowship Award in 1997. He was the recipient of the best journal paper award in 2013 by IEEE Transactions on Terahertz Science and Technology. He also received more than 30 NASA technical achievement and new technology invention awards. He is a Fellow of IEEE and IEEE.



    Hosted by Prof. Hossein Hashemi, Prof. Mike Chen and Prof. Mahta Moghaddam

    Organized and hosted by Masashi Yamagata

    For questions or additional details, please email myamagat@usc.edu

    Host: Hosted by Prof. Hossein Hashemi, Prof. Mike Chen, Prof. Mahta Moghaddam, and Masashi Yamagata

    More Info: http://mhi.usc.edu/events/event-details/?event_id=910780

    Location: 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Elise Herrera-Green

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Oct 27, 2014 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Peter Kuhn, Ph.D., Professor of Biological Sciences and Director of Bridge Institute, Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, USC

    Talk Title: TBA

    Host: Norberto Grzywacz

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • CS Colloquium: Bilge Mutlu (University of Wisconsin-Madison) - Human-Centered Methods and Principles for Designing Robotic Products

    Tue, Oct 28, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Bilge Mutlu , University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Talk Title: Human-Centered Methods and Principles for Designing Robotic Products

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Robotic products constitute an emerging family of technologies that holds tremendous promise for everyday use. This promise also presents challenges for designers: the interactions they afford can be far more complex than those with conventional products, and designing for these interactions introduces many new questions. For instance, how can we design a product that follows human social norms? What is the design space for such a product? How can we empower designers to tackle such design problems? In this talk, I will present my group's work on building human-centered tools, methods, and knowledge to enable the design of robotic products. In particular, I will describe the development of novel tools and methods that support complex design tasks across the key stages of the design process, including analysis, synthesis, and evaluation, and an exploration into the design space for robotic products across different platforms, including social, assistive, and telepresence robots.


    Biography: Bilge Mutlu is an assistant professor of computer science, psychology, and industrial engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his Ph.D. degree from Carnegie Mellon University's Human-Computer Interaction Institute in 2009. His background combines training in interaction design, human-computer interaction, and robotics with industry experience in product design and development. Dr. Mutlu is a former Fulbright Scholar and the recipient of the NSF CAREER award and several paper awards and nominations, including HRI 2008, HRI 2009, HRI 2011, UbiComp 2013, IVA 2013, RSS 2013, and HRI 2014. His research has been covered by national and international press including the NewScientist, MIT Technology Review, Discovery News, Science Nation, and Voice of America. He has served in the Steering Committee of the HRI Conference and the Editorial Board of IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing, co-chairing the Program Committees for HRI 2015 and ICSR 2011 and the Program Sub-committees on Design for CHI 2013 and CHI 2014.


    Host: Maja Mataric

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Oct 29, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Joe Klewicki, Professor in Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH & University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia

    Talk Title: Self-Similarity in the Inertial Region of Wall Turbulence

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Abstract: The inverse of the von Karman constant, K, is the leading coefficient in the equation describing the logarithmic mean velocity profile in wall bounded turbulent flows. Previous research demonstrates that the asymptomatic value of K derives from an emerging condition of dynamic self-similar hierarchy of scaling layers. First-principles based analyses are used to reveal a number of properties associated with the asymptomatic value of K. The development leads toward, but terminates short of, analytically determining a value for K. Consistent with the differential transformations underlying the invariant form admitted by the governing mean equation, it is further demonstrated that the value of K arises from two geometric features associated with the inertial turbulent motions responsible for momentum transport. One nominally pertains to the shape of the relevant motions as quantified by their area coverage in any given wall-parallel plane, and the other pertains to the changing size of these motions in the wall-nominal direction. Data from direct numerical simulations and higher Reynolds number experiments convincingly support the self-similar geometric structure indicated by the analysis.

    Biography: Joseph Klewicki holds joint appointments in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Melbourne, Australia and the University of New Hampshire. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and a Distinguished Alumnus of the Michigan State University (MSU) Department of Mechanical Engineering. He received his BS (1983), MS (1985) and PhD (1989) degrees from MSU, Georgia Tech and MSU respectively. His areas of specialization include experimental methods in fluid mechanics, turbulent and unsteady flows, vorticity dynamics, boundary layers, atmosphere surface layer phenomena.

    Host: Professor Paul Ronney

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • Astani Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Wed, Oct 29, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Isaam Najm, Water Quality & Treatment Solutions, Inc

    Talk Title: Challenges to the Implementation of Biological Groundwater Treatment

    Abstract:



    Host: Dr. Amy Childress

    Location: Grace Ford Salvatori Hall Of Letters, Arts & Sciences (GFS) - 106

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • CS Colloquium: Chris J. C. Burges (Microsoft Research )

    Thu, Oct 30, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Chris J. C. Burges , Microsoft Research

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: TBA

    Host: Fei Sha

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • BME Special Seminar: Developing interdisciplinary approaches using biomedical ultrasound

    Fri, Oct 31, 2014 @ 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Cheri X. Deng, Ph.D., Professor of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    Talk Title: Developing interdisciplinary approaches using biomedical ultrasound

    Biography: http://www.bme.umich.edu/people/index.php?un=cxdeng
    Host: Kirk Shung, Ph.D., Dean's Professor in Biomedical Engineering

    Location: Corwin D. Denney Research Center (DRB) - 146

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • NL Seminar

    Fri, Oct 31, 2014 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Nikolaos Malandrakis, (USC/SAIL)

    Talk Title: NL Seminar- Title TBA

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: TBA

    Biography: TBA

    Host: Aliya Deri and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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