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Events Calendar



Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars
Events for April

  • AI SEMINAR

    Fri, Apr 01, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Mahdi Soltanolkotabi, Assistant Professor at USC

    Talk Title: Finding low-complexity models without the shackles of convexity

    Series: AI Seminar

    Abstract: In many applications, one wishes to estimate a large number of parameters from highly incomplete data samples. Low-dimensional models such as sparsity, low-rank, etc provide a principled approach for addressing the challenges posed by such high-dimensional data. The last decade has witnessed a flurry of activity in understanding when and how it is possible to find low complexity models via convex relaxations. However, the computational cost of such convex schemes can be prohibitive. In fact, in this talk I will argue that over insistence on convex methods has stymied progress in many application domains. I will discuss my ongoing research efforts to unshackle such problems from the confines of convexity opening the door for new applications.

    I will discuss three concrete problems characterized by incomplete information about a low-complexity object of interest. The first is the century-old phase retrieval problem where one wishes to recover a signal from magnitude only measurements--phase information is completely missing. The second is a problem in data analysis, where we observe only a few incomplete linear measurements from a data matrix (e.g. a few entries) and wish to reliably infer all of the entries of the matrix. The third problem involves the recovery of a structured image from highly compressed information--most measurements are missing. To retrieve seemingly lost information I will present novel non-convex algorithms for these problems. Surprisingly, despite the lack of convexity these algorithms can provably converge to the global optimum and hence impute the missing information precisely.



    Biography: Mahdi Soltanolkotabi completed his Ph.D. in electrical engineering at Stanford University in 2014. He was a postdoctoral researcher in the Algorithms, Machines, and People AMP lab and the EECS and Statistics departments at UC Berkeley during the 2014-2015 academic year. His research focuses on design and mathematical understanding of computationally efficient algorithms for optimization, high dimensional statistics, machine learning, signal processing and computational imaging. Recently, a main focus of his research has been on developing and analyzing algorithms for non-convex optimization with provable guarantees of convergence to the global optimum.

    WILL NOT BE WEBCASTED

    Host: Emilio Ferrara

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 1135 - 11th fl Large CR

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Alma Nava / Information Sciences Institute

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  • NL Seminar-Harnessing reviews to build richer models of opinions

    Fri, Apr 01, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Julian McAuley , UCSD

    Talk Title: Harnessing reviews to build richer models of opinions

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: Online reviews are often our first port of call when considering products and purchases online. Yet navigating huge volumes of reviews (many of which we might disagree with) is laborious, especially when we are interested in some niche aspect of a product. This suggests a need to build models that are capable of capturing the complex and idiosyncratic semantics of reviews, in order to build richer and more personalized recommender systems. In this talk I'll discuss three such directions: First, how can reviews be harnessed to better understand the dimensions (or facets) of people's opinions? Second, how can reviews be used to answer targeted questions, that may be subjective or require personalized responses? And third, how can reviews themselves be synthesized, so as to predict what a reviewer would say, even for products they haven't seen yet?




    Biography: Dr. McAuley has been an Assistant Professer in the Computer Science Department at the University of California, San Diego since 2014. Previously he was a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University after receiving his PhD from the Australian National University in 2011. His research is concerned with developing predictive models of human behavior using large volumes of online activity data.

    Host: Xing Shi and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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  • Energy Efficient Memory Circuits: From IoT to Exascale Systems and Beyond

    Mon, Apr 04, 2016 @ 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Jaydeep Kulkarni, Staff Research Scientist, Circuit Research Scientist, Circuit Research Lab, Intel Corporation

    Talk Title: Energy Efficient Memory Circuits: From IoT to Exascale Systems and Beyond

    Abstract: With the rapid advances in computing systems spanning from billions of IoTs (Internet of Things) to high performance exascale super computers, energy efficient design is an absolute must. It is projected that by 2020, around 50 billion internet connected devices will be deployed generating hundreds of zettabytes (1021 bytes) of data. It is estimated that embedded memories can occupy up to 70% of the die area in these devices. These trends clearly indicate the paramount importance of developing energy efficient, dense memory circuits and systems across the entire compute continuum. I will present two energy efficient memory solutions one geared for IoT systems while the other targeted at high performance exascale systems. With extremely low energy budget, IoT systems would need ultralow voltage circuits for always-ON sensing and computing. Low voltage Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) operation is challenging due to conflicting read-stability vs write-ability requirements. I will present two Schmitt Trigger based SRAMs having built-in process variation tolerance for extreme low voltage operation. Measurement results from 130nm test-chips confirm successful operation up to 150mV [JSSC'07, TVLSI'12]. At the other end of compute spectrum consisting of high performance exascale systems, fixed voltage/ frequency guardbands are applied to the nominal operating specifications to guarantee reliable operation in the presence of temperature variations, voltage supply droops, and transistor aging induced degradation. Since most of the systems operate at nominal conditions, the necessary guardbands for these infrequent dynamic variations significantly limit the system energy efficiency. I will present adaptive and resilient domino register file design techniques to realize a unified framework for logic + memory operating on same voltage/frequency domain. Measurement results from a 22nm test-chip demonstrate 21% higher throughput with 67% improved energy efficiency [ISSCC'15, JSSC'16]. I will conclude the seminar by highlighting the interesting areas in memory research for the development of next generation of energy efficient computing systems. These aspects include emerging non-volatile technologies such as STT, and RRAM memories, memory scaling using monolithic 3D integration, logic-in-memory organization / architectures for non von Neumann computing models such as neuromorphic computing, and security/privacy issues in next zettabytes of data.

    Biography: Jaydeep P. Kulkarni received the Bachelor of Engineering (B.E.) degree from the University of Pune, India in 2002, the Master of Technology (M. Tech.) degree from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) Bangalore, India in 2004 and Ph.D. degree from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 2009 all in electrical engineering. During 2004-05, he worked as a Design Engineer at Cypress Semiconductors, Bangalore and designed I/O circuits for micro-power SRAMs. He joined Circuit Research Lab (CRL) at Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, OR in 2009, where he is currently working as a staff research scientist. His research is focused on energy efficient integrated circuits and systems. He has filed 27 patents and published 52 papers in referred journals and conferences (1500 citations).
    Dr. Kulkarni received 2004 Best M. Tech Student Award from IISc Bangalore, 2008 SRC Inventor Recognition Awards, 2008 ISLPED Design Contest Award, 2008 Intel Foundation Ph.D. Fellowship Award, 2008 SRC TECHCON best paper in session award, 2010 Purdue School of ECE Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award, 2012 Intel patent recognition award, six Intel Divisional Recognition Awards for successful technology transfers, 2015 IEEE Circuits and Systems Society's Transactions on VLSI systems best paper award, and 2015 Semiconductor Research Corporation's (SRC) outstanding industrial liaison award. He has participated in technical program committees of A-SSCC, ISLPED, ISCAS, and ASQED conferences. He serves as an associate editor for IEEE Transactions on VLSI Systems, and as an industrial liaison at the SRC, NSF Visual Cortex on Silicon program, Stanford System-X alliance, Stanford-NMTRI and SONIC STARnet research program. He is a senior member of IEEE.

    Host: Professor Peter Beerel

    Location: 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Suzanne Wong

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Apr 04, 2016 @ 12:30 PM - 01:49 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Ibsen,

    Talk Title: CANCELLED TALK

    Host: K. Kirk Shung, PhD

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Markovian Evolution of a Quantum Ensemble and its Long-Term Behavior

    Mon, Apr 04, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Min-Hsiu Hsieh, University of Technology, Sydney

    Talk Title: Markovian Evolution of a Quantum Ensemble and its Long-Term Behavior

    Abstract: We extend the theory of quantum Markov processes on a single quantum state to a broader theory that covers Markovian evolution of an ensemble of quantum states. This generalizes Lindblad's formulation of quantum dynamical semigroups. Our formalism includes an explicit form of semigroups, their time derivative-” the infinitesimal generator, a carr'e du champ operator, and matrix *phi-entropy. We find a matrix *phi-Sobolev inequality that governs the exponential decay of the these matrix *phi-entropy. Special cases of the matrix *phi-entropy evaluate to the Holevo quantity and the variance of the ensemble, which allows us to relate our formalism to classical coding over quantum channels. In particular, we show that the convergence rates of two special semigroups-the depolarizing and phase-damping channels-can be explicitly computed. They result in fundamentally different equilibrium situations, for which there is no classical analogy.

    Biography: Min-Hsiu Hsieh received his PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, in 2008. From 2008-2010, he was a Researcher at the ERATO-SORST Quantum Computation and Information Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo, Japan. From 2010-2012, he was a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Statistical Laboratory, the Centre for Mathematical Sciences, the University of Cambridge, UK. He is now an Future Fellow and Associate Professor at the Centre for Quantum Computation & Intelligent Systems (QCIS), Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology (FEIT), University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). His scientific interests include quantum Shannon theory, entanglement theory, and quantum coding theory.

    Host: Todd Brun, x03503, tbrun@usc.edu

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 539

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Gerrielyn Ramos

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  • EE 598 Cyber-Physical Systems Seminar Series

    Mon, Apr 04, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Edward A. Lee, Professor, University of California Berkeley

    Talk Title: Resurrecting Laplace's Demon: The Case for Deterministic Models for Cyber-Physical Systems

    Abstract: In 1814, Pierre-Simon Laplace published an argument for determinism in the universe, arguing that if someone (a demon) were to know the precise location and momentum of every atom in the universe, then their past and future values for any given time are completely determined and can be calculated from the laws of classical mechanics. This principle, of course, has been roundly invalidated by quantum mechanics, and yet the laws of classical mechanics continue to be extremely useful for prediction. In this talk, I will argue that models plays different (complementary) roles in engineering and science, and that deterministic models have historically proved proved even more valuable in engineering than in science.

    Cyber-physical systems, which combine computation with physical dynamics, may seem on the surface to be a particularly poor match for deterministic models. I will argue that the next big advance in engineering methods must include deterministic models for CPS, and I will show that such models are both possible and practical.


    Biography: Edward A. Lee is the Robert S. Pepper Distinguished Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS) department at U.C. Berkeley. His research interests center on design, modeling, and analysis of embedded, real-time computational systems. He is the director of the nine-university TerraSwarm Research Center http://terraswarm.org , a director of Chess, the Berkeley Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems, and the director of the Berkeley Ptolemy project. From 2005-2008, he served as chair of the EE Division and then chair of the EECS Department at UC Berkeley. He is co-author of nine books (counting second and third editions) and numerous papers. He has led the development of several influential open-source software packages, notably Ptolemy and its various spinoffs. He received the B.S. degree in Computer Science from Yale University, New Haven, CT, in 1979, the S.M. degree in EECS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, in 1981, and the Ph.D. degree in EECS from the University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, in 1986. From 1979 to 1982 he was a member of technical staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Holmdel, New Jersey, in the Advanced Data Communications Laboratory. He is a co-founder of BDTI, Inc., where he is currently a Senior Technical Advisor, and has consulted for a number of other companies. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, was an NSF Presidential Young Investigator, and won the 1997 Frederick Emmons Terman Award for Engineering Education.

    Professor Lee's research group studies cyber-physical systems, which integrate physical dynamics with software and networks. Specifically, his group has made major contributions in models of computation with time and concurrency, model-based design and analysis, domain-specific languages, architectures for real-time computing, schedulability analysis, and modeling and programming of distributed real-time systems. His group has been involved with parallel and distributed computing, including models of computation with distributed real-time behaviors, partitioning and scheduling algorithms, backtracking techniques for fault tolerance and recovery, dataflow models of computation, and modeling of sensor networks. His group has made key contributions in semantics of timed and concurrent systems, including domain polymorphism, behavioral type systems, metamodeling of semantics, and comparative models of computation. His group has also worked on blending computing with continuous dynamics and hybrid systems. Prof. Lee himself has an extensive background in signal processing and physical-layer communication systems, and has co-authored five books on these subjects, in addition to four books on embedded systems technologies.


    Host: Paul Bogdan

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Estela Lopez

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  • CS Colloquium: Chang Liu (University of Maryland, College Park) - Secure Cloud Computing - A Programming Language Approach

    Tue, Apr 05, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Chang Liu, University of Maryland, College Park

    Talk Title: Secure Cloud Computing - A Programming Language Approach

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    The big data era has dramatically transformed our lives; however, security incidents such as data breaches put sensitive data (e.g. photos, identities, genomes) at risk. To protect users' data privacy, there is a growing trend to build secure cloud computing systems, which enables computation over two or more parties' sensitive data, while revealing nothing more than the results to the participating parties. Conceptually, privacy-preserving computing systems leverage cryptographic techniques (e.g. secure multiparty computation) and trusted hardware (e.g. secure processors) to instantiate a "secure" abstract machine consisting of a CPU and encrypted memory, so that an adversary cannot learn information through either the computation within the CPU or the data in the memory. Unfortunately, evidence has shown that, side channels (e.g. memory accesses, timing, and termination) in such a "secure" abstract machine may potentially leak highly sensitive information including cryptographic keys that form the root of trust for the secure systems.

    I conduct synergistic research to bridge cryptography and programming language techniques to address
    this problem. My research broadly expanded the investigation of a research direction called trace oblivious computation, where I employ programming language techniques to prevent side channel information leakage. In this talk, I will discuss my work on two promising approaches, i.e. secure-processor and secure multiparty computation, toward building a secure cloud computing system. I will focus on both theoretical development to enforce formal security, as well as practical system building to yield the state-of-the-art results.


    Biography: Chang Liu is a PhD candidate in the Department of Computer Science at University of Maryland, College Park, where he works in the Maryland Cybersecurity Lab with his advisors Michael Hicks and Elaine Shi. His work broadly expanded the investigation of the research direction of trace oblivious computation, which made significant impact on trusted hardware-based secure computation and cryptography-based secure multiparty computation. He is the recipient of John Vlissides Award (2015) and University of Maryland's Outstanding Early Graduate Student Award (2014). His papers has received a NSA Best Scientific Cybersecurity Paper Award (2013), the Best Paper Award of ASPLOS (2015), and 1st Best Paper Award in Applied Cyber Security Paper at CSAW (1st Place, 2015). His ObliVM system won the HLI Award for Secure Multiparty Computation in the iDash Secure Genomics Analysis Competition (2015).


    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • USC Stem Cell Seminar: Peggy Goodell, Baylor College of Medicine

    Tue, Apr 05, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Peggy Goodell, Baylor College of Medicine

    Talk Title: DNMT3A in hematopoietic stem cells, cancer and aging

    Series: Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC Distinguished Speakers Series

    Abstract: DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3A) has recently emerged as an important tumor suppressor in hematologic malignancies, and its ablation in mouse hematopoietic stem cells inhibits differentiation. We will describe the use of DNMT3A knockout mice to study its role in myeloid and lymphoid malignancy development and its function in maintaining global DNA methylation. The role of DNMT3A mutations in intercellular competition in the context of aging will also be discussed.

    Host: Senta Georgia

    More Info: https://calendar.usc.edu/event/speaker_peggy_goodell_baylor_college_of_medicine?utm_campaign=widget&utm_medium=widget&utm_source=USC+Event+Calendar%3A+Beta#.Vtj5lCnFl04
    Webcast: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-semina

    Location: Eli & Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Resch. (BCC) - First Floor Seminar Room

    WebCast Link: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-seminar

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Cristy Lytal/USC Stem Cell

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  • Smart Data Pricing

    Tue, Apr 05, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Carlee Joe-Wong, Princeton University

    Talk Title: Smart Data Pricing

    Abstract: Data traffic has increased sharply over the past decade and is expected to grow further as Internet applications from video streaming to cloud storage become ever more popular. Yet data network capacity is not expanding fast enough to handle this exponential growth, leading service providers to change their mobile data plans in an effort to reduce congestion. Inspired by these ongoing changes and building on work from the 1990s, smart data pricing (SDP) aims to rethink data pricing for tomorrow's networks. In this talk, I will focus on the temporal and content dimensions of SDP and then briefly discuss the problem of fairly allocating network resources to applications with diverse resource needs. Time-dependent pricing (TDP) proposes to lower short-lived peaks in network congestion by incentivizing users to shift their data usage to less congested times. While TDP has been used in industries such as smart grids, TDP for mobile data presents unique challenges, e.g., it is difficult to predict how users will react to the prices on different days. Thus, we developed algorithms that continually infer users' changing responses to the offered prices, without collecting private data usage information. We implemented these algorithms in a prototype system, which we used to conduct the first field trial of TDP for mobile data. We showed that our TDP algorithms led to significantly less temporal fluctuation in demand, benefiting the service provider and lowering users' data prices overall.

    Sponsored data, an emerging form of data pricing offered by AT&T, allows content providers to subsidize their users' data traffic; the resulting revenue can be used to expand existing data networks. We consider the impact of sponsored data on different content providers and users, showing that cost-aware users and cost-unaware content providers reap disproportionate benefits. Simulations across representative users and content providers verify that sponsored data may help to bridge the digital divide between different types of users, yet can exacerbate competition between content providers.


    Biography: Carlee Joe-Wong is a Ph.D. candidate and Jacobus fellow at Princeton University's Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics. She is interested in mathematical aspects of computer and information networks, including work on smart data pricing and fair resource allocation. Carlee received her A.B. in mathematics in 2011 and her M.A. in applied mathematics in 2013 both from Princeton University. In 2013-“2014, she was the Director of Advanced Research at DataMi, a startup she co-founded from her data pricing research. Carlee received the INFORMS ISS Design Science Award in 2014 and the Best Paper Award at IEEE INFOCOM 2012. She was a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellow (NDSEG) from 2011 to 2013.


    Host: Professor Konstantinos Psounis

    Location: 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Suzanne Wong

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  • CS Colloquium: Tien Nguyen (Iowa State University) -Program Analysis and Large-scale Code Mining for Software Quality

    Tue, Apr 05, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Tien Nguyen, Iowa State University

    Talk Title: Program Analysis and Large-scale Code Mining for Software Quality

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Detecting and fixing software defects are important in developing reliable and high-quality software systems. Software defects are so prevalent and detrimental that they cost the US economy an estimated $59 billion annually. In this talk, I will present my research that develops advanced program analysis methods in combination with large-scale code mining and software analytics to support developers in the process of software maintenance, detecting and fixing software defects. I will present our cross-stage, variability-aware program analysis infrastructure for dynamic Web applications to support the detection and debugging of software defects in web development. The advanced techniques include output-oriented symbolic execution, variability-aware web code analysis, and multi-language, embedded code analysis. I will also present an integrated approach between program analysis and statistical learning to mine from a large-scale code repository infrastructure to support important software engineering tasks including inferring and checking the specifications of software libraries, migrating code from one platform in a programming language to another, and detecting software vulnerabilities in API usages with pattern mining and anomaly detection.

    Biography: Dr. Tien N. Nguyen is currently an Associate Professor in both Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Computer Science Department at Iowa State University (ISU). He is currently serving as the Chair of Software Systems Area. Since joining ISU in 2005, his research interests include program analysis, mining large-scale software repositories, and software maintenance and evolution. Since 2009, he has been awarded 3 ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Awards, one Best Paper Award, and one best ICSE Formal Research Demonstration Award at the top-tier, international software engineering conferences including ICSE, FSE, and ASE. His research has been supported by 14 external grants including 8 NSF grants from US National Science Foundation (PI on 5 of them), and several grants from industry including ABB Software Research Grant Program, Litton Industry, IBM research, and Agile Alliance Academic Program. He will be serving as the Program Co-Chair of the 32nd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE 2017) and the Co-Chair of the Formal Research Demo Track at the 40th International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2018). He has served on Program Committees and Program Boards of top-tier software engineering conferences including ICSE, FSE, ASE, OOPSLA, ECOOP, and ICSME. He also served as the Chair of Formal Research Demo Track at ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE 2010). He was awarded the Litton Professorship Medallion Award from Iowa State University in 2008 for young faculty who exhibits excellent leadership in research and teaching. He is one of the key persons who have first contributed to the ABET-accredited B.Sc. degree program in Software Engineering at ISU.

    Host: CS Department

    More Info: https://bluejeans.com/514828239

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • CS Colloquium: Aaron Schulman (Stanford)

    Wed, Apr 06, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Aaron Schulman, Stanford

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Event details will be added closer to the date.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • CS Colloquium: Aaron Schulman (Stanford) - Why applications are still draining our batteries, and how we can help

    Wed, Apr 06, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Aaron Schulman , Stanford

    Talk Title: Why applications are still draining our batteries, and how we can help.

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Application developers lack tools to profile and compare the energy consumption of different software designs. This energy-optimization task is challenging because of unpredictable interactions between the application and increasingly complex power management logic. Yet, having accurate power information would allow application developers to both avoid inefficient designs and discover opportunities for new optimizations.

    In this talk, I will show that it is possible to accurately measure system-level power and attribute it to application activities. I will present BattOr, a portable, easy-to-use power monitor that provides developers with a profile of the energy consumption of their designs-”without modifications to hardware or software. I will show how Google developers are using BattOr to improve Chrome's energy efficiency. I will also show how fine-grained understanding of cellular power at different signal strengths enables novel energy optimizations. Finally, I will describe my future plans to attribute system-level power to individual hardware components and to investigate opportunities presented by instrumenting every server in a data center with fine-grained power monitoring.

    Biography: Aaron Schulman is a Postdoctoral Scholar at Stanford working with Sachin Katti; he earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Maryland, where he was advised by Neil Spring. His research interests are in low-power embedded systems, wireless communication, and network measurement. Aaron's research on the BattOr power monitor has been funded by Google, is being commercialized by his startup Mellow Research, and is becoming Google's de facto standard tool for measuring the energy consumption of the Chrome web browser. For his dissertation, Aaron provided the first observations of fundamental factors that limit the reliability of the Internet's critical last-mile infrastructure. His dissertation was selected to receive the the 2013 ACM SIGCOMM Doctoral Dissertation Award. http://stanford.edu/ aschulm

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Applications of Complex Systems Modeling in Public Health: Progress and Potential

    Wed, Apr 06, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Systems Architecting and Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Ross Hammond , Brookings Institution

    Talk Title: Applications of Complex Systems Modeling in Public Health: Progress and Potential

    Abstract: Dr. Hammond will provide an overview and several current examples of the fast-growing application of complex systems approaches to public health etiology, policy, implementation, and interventions. He will talk about important lessons learned, limitations and best practices, and future potential. The presentation will draw on several recent and active research projects funded by the National Institutes of Health in the United States, covering topics ranging from communicable disease to obesity and tobacco control and ranging from the community to the national level.

    Please make sure to RSVP to Luz Castillo at Antunez@usc.edu if you would like to attend.

    Biography: Ross A. Hammond is a Senior Fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution, where he is also Director of the Center on Social Dynamics and Policy. His primary area of expertise is modeling complex dynamics in economic, social, and public health systems using methods from complexity science. His current research topics include obesity etiology and prevention, food systems, tobacco control, behavioral epidemiology, health disparities, childhood literacy, crime, corruption, and decision-making. Hammond received his B.A. from Williams College and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. He has authored numerous scientific articles in prominent journals such as Lancet, JAMA Pediatrics, American Journal of Public Health, PNAS, Evolution, and Journal of Conflict Resolution, and his work has been featured in The Atlantic Monthly, New Scientist, Salon, Scientific American, and major news media.

    Hammond was recently appointed by the U.S. HHS Secretary Burwell to the advisory council for the National Institute of Minority Health & Health disparities. He has served on several committees at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science and serves as a Public Health Advisor at the National Cancer Institute and an advisory Special Government Employee at the FDA Center for Tobacco Products. He is also an appointed member of the newly formed Lancet Commission on Obesity. Hammond serves on the editorial boards of the journals Behavioral Science & Policy and Childhood Obesity, and has been a member of four NIH-funded research networks using complex systems approaches: MIDAS (Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study), ENVISION (part of the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research), and NICH (Network on Inequality, Complexity, and Health), and SCTC (State and Community Tobacco Control). Hammond currently holds academic appointments at the Harvard School of Public Health, the Santa Fe Institute, and Washington University in St Louis. He has been a consultant to the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the Food and Drug Administration, the Institute of Medicine, the New York City Department of Health, and several universities. He has taught computational modeling at Harvard, the University of Michigan, the National Cancer Institute, and the NIH/CDC Institute on Systems Science and Health.

    Host: The Schaeffer Center, together with the USC mHealth Collaboratory

    More Info: http://healthpolicy.usc.edu/NewsItem.aspx?ID=202

    More Information: Ross Hammond Seminar.pdf

    Location: VPD LL101

    Audiences: RSVP to Luz Castillo at Antunez@usc.edu

    Posted By: Luz Castillo

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  • Communications, Networks & Systems (CommNetS) Seminar

    Wed, Apr 06, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Samet Oymak, Caltech

    Talk Title: Sharp tradeoffs for randomized numerical algorithms: Let the theory meet practice

    Series: CommNetS

    Abstract: Randomized numerical algorithms are fundamental for a variety of problems in signal processing and machine learning. Examples include sparse signal processing and dimensionality reduction for faster machine learning. These algorithms come with various tradeoffs involving the amount of data, computational resources and statistical precision. Characterization of these tradeoffs is crucial for correct hyperparameter selection, time sensitive optimization and eventual performance of the algorithms. In this talk, we describe our recent results on how to accurately predict these tradeoffs in multiple scenarios which helps us further close the gap between theory and practice.

    Biography: Samet Oymak is a software engineer at Google. Prior to that, he was a fellow at Simons Institute and a postdoctoral scholar in the AMPLab at UC Berkeley. He received his BS from Bilkent University in 2009 and his MS and PhD from Caltech in 2014, all in electrical engineering. At Caltech, he was advised by Babak Hassibi and won the departmental best thesis award.

    Host: Prof. Mahdi Soltanolkotabi

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • Petroleum Engineering Graduate Seminar

    Wed, Apr 06, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Rajan N. Chokshi , Accutant Solutions

    Talk Title: Artificial Lift Applications in Unconventional & Tight Reservoirs

    Abstract: The unique challenges of hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs have required operators to take a fresh approach to asset development. Decisions about well placement, geometry, completion, and production are interrelated and must be addressed as part of life cycle planning. Artificial lift systems must be configured for rapidly changing and dynamic production environments. Migration from one lift technology to another is often required for wells that typically experience steep production decline rates. This presentation discusses the unique challenges of unconventional production and presents current production trends supported by field examples. Recommendations for optimizing production from shale and tight reservoirs are presented.

    Biography: Dr. Rajan Chokshi works as Optimizer for Accutant Solutions of Houston -“ A training and consulting services provider for production optimization.

    In a career spanning over 30 years, Chokshi has worked on petroleum and software engineering projects globally in the areas of multi-phase flow, artificial lift design, and production optimization in oil and gas industries for national oil company and service providers. He continues to consult and teach courses in these areas for SPE, universities and other organizations. His interests are developing and nurturing young talent globally, technology integration and commercialization.

    Dr. Chokshi serves on the SPE global committees for training and production awards. He holds a Bachelors and Masters in Chemical Engineering from the Gujarat Univarsity and IIT-Kanpur, India; and a Ph.D. in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Tulsa, USA.


    Host: USC Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    More Information: Chokshi Seminar_4_6_16.doc

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 324

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Juli Legat

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  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Apr 06, 2016 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Mark Pankow, Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering at the North Carolina State University

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • Aerospace On Campus Series

    Thu, Apr 07, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Frank Pray, Aviation Week Network

    Talk Title: Careers In The Aerospace Industry

    Abstract: Learn about top technologies and challenges ahead from an Aviation Week Technology expert while connecting with executive leaders about careers in the aerospace industry. OPEN TO ALL MAJORS!

    Host: University of Southern California

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Thu, Apr 07, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Nora El-Gohary, Ph.D., Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Talk Title: Big, Deep, Smart, and Human-Centered Data Analytics for Sustainable and Value-Adding Infrastructure Systems

    Abstract: See Attachment



    More Information: Dr. Nora El-Gohary Talk.docx

    Location: Kaprielian Hall (KAP) - 140

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • Emerging Innovations in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology

    Fri, Apr 08, 2016 @ 09:00 AM - 06:30 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: various, various

    Talk Title: various

    Abstract: 9-9:25 a.m. Registration


    9:25-9:30 a.m. Opening remarks


    9:30-10:15 a.m. Olivier Cinquin (UC Irvine) -“ Making sense of regulatory network complexity: Design principles of a self-renewing organ


    10:15-11 a.m. Bing Ren (UCSD) -“ Large-scale functional characterization of regulatory sequences in the stem cell genome


    11:10-11:30 a.m. Joanna Salva (T32 trainee) -“ A noncanonical, nuclear role for Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling


    11:30-11:50 a.m. Ingrid Lua (T32 trainee) -“ Mesothelial cells: Mesenchymal progenitor cells in development, injury and regeneration


    noon-1 p.m. Lunch


    1-1:45 p.m. William Greenleaf (Stanford) -“ Principles of regulatory variation revealed by single-cell ATAC-seq


    1:45-2:30 p.m. Kevan Shokat (UCSF) -“ Non-traditional strategies for drugging traditional targets


    2:30-3 p.m. Coffee break


    3-3:20 p.m. Kimberley Babos (Graduate student) -“ Robust direct reprogramming generates induced motor neurons that recapitulate ALS disease phenotypes in vitro


    3:20-3:40 p.m. Hironori Hojo (Postdoc) -“ Sp7/Osterix is restricted to bone-forming vertebrates where it acts as a Dlx co-factor in osteoblast specification


    3:40-4 p.m. Cambrian Liu (Postdoc) -“ Tissue morphogenesis and clonal selection during repair of colonic epithelium


    4-4:45 p.m. Helen Blau (Stanford) -“ The fountain of youth: Muscle stem cell rejuvenation strategies


    5-6:30 p.m. Poster presentation

    Sponsored by Amgen, TaKaRa and Clontech


    Host: USC Stem Cell

    More Info: https://calendar.usc.edu/event/emerging_innovations_in_developmental_and_stem_cell_biology?utm_campaign=widget&utm_medium=widget&utm_source=USC+Event+Calendar%3A+Beta#.VwQFo3DFl04

    Location: Eli & Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Resch. (BCC) - First Floor Seminar Room

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Cristy Lytal/USC Stem Cell

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  • AI Seminar-Prominent features of rumors in social networks

    Fri, Apr 08, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Meeyoung Cha , KAIST

    Talk Title: Prominent features of rumors in social networks

    Series: Artificial Intelligence Seminar

    Abstract: *This is the First of 2 AI Seminar Talks on FRI. 4/8

    Social psychology literature defines a rumor as a story in general circulation without confirmation or certainty to facts. Rumors arise in the context of ambiguity, when the meaning of a situation is not readily apparent or when people feel an acute need for
    Security. Rumors hence are a powerful, pervasive, and persistent force affecting people and groups. This talk will introduce efforts on identifying rumors using massive data in social media. I will discuss the distinct patterns we observed from rumor diffusions in terms of the following aspects: temporal, structural, and linguistic.

    (Published at IEEE 13th International Conference on Data Mining Conference 2013, Joint work with Sejeong Kwon, Kyomin Jung, Wei Chen, Yajun Wang)



    Biography: Meeyoung Cha is an associate professor at Graduate School of Culture Technology in KAIST and currently a Visiting Professor at Facebook. Her research interests are in the analysis of large-scale online social networks with emphasis the spread of information, moods, and user influence. She received the best paper awards at ACM IMC 2007 for analyzing long-tail videos in YouTube and at ICWSM 2012 for studying social conventions in Twitter. Her research has been published in leading journals and conferences including PLoS One, Information Sciences, WWW, and ICWSM, and has been featured at the popular media outlets including the New York Times websites, Harvard Business Review's research blog, the Washington Post, the New Scientist.


    Host: Emilio Ferrara

    Webcast: http://webcasterms1.isi.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=270f829804634fd8b615e50d00f243e41

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    WebCast Link: http://webcasterms1.isi.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=270f829804634fd8b615e50d00f243e41d

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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  • NL Seminar-Learning Distributed Representations from Network Data and Human Navigation

    Fri, Apr 08, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Hao Wu, USC/ISI

    Talk Title: Learning Distributed Representations from Network Data and Human Navigation

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: The increasing growth of network data such as linked documents on the Web and social networks, has imposed great challenges on automatic data analysis. We study the problem of learning representations of network data, which is of critical for applications including data classification, ranking and link prediction. We present neural network embedding algorithms to learn distributed representations of network data that capture the deep context of each data point, and human cognition in navigation data. To improve the scalability of our algorithms, we use efficient optimization and sampling methods.


    Biography: Hao Wu is a PhD student at USC/ISI, advised by Kristina Lerman.

    Host: Xing Shi and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. Seminar

    Fri, Apr 08, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Luis Montoya and Farimah Shirmohammadi, CEE Ph.D. Candidates

    Abstract: TBA

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • Meaning and Memory Retrieval: Evidence from Semantic Priming and Sentence Memory

    Mon, Apr 11, 2016 @ 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Peter Gordon, University of Northern Carolina, Chapel Hill

    Talk Title: Meaning and Memory Retrieval: Evidence from Semantic Priming and Sentence Memory

    Abstract: Semantic priming, where the processing of a word is facilitated when it is preceded by a related word, has generally been taken as evidence of spreading activation, the idea that accessing the meaning of the prime word facilitates recognition of the target word by pre-activating its meaning before it is presented. The idea that pre-activation of meaning by a prime word (or other stimulus) increases the accessibility of words (or other psychological constructs) has spread from cognitive psychology to many other areas including cognitive neuroscience, social influence, psychopathology and the effects of aging. This idea is challenged by a series of studies in my lab that analyzed response-time distributions from newly-developed ocular-response tasks that are performed more quickly than tasks with manual or vocal responses and for that reason give a more direct view of lexical processing; the results show that the semantic relation between the prime and target influences processing only after the target has been seen. The findings are inconsistent with spreading-activation models and instead support alternative models in which the process of retrieving lexical information from the target word is facilitated by the consistent contextual information provided by the prime word. Additional studies on how meaning influences sentence reading and recall demonstrate that explanations based on memory retrieval play a necessary role in explanations of human language processing and that they eliminate the need for expectation-based explanations.

    Biography: Dr. Peter C. Gordon received his B.S. in Psychology from Georgetown University in 1975 and his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the University of Michigan in 1984. He was Assistant and Associate Professor in the Psychology Department at Harvard University from 1984 through 1993, and subsequently joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he is Professor of Psychology and Faculty Fellow at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center. He is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and a superannuated member of the Psychological Round Table. He has served as a reviewer for multiple NSF programs (Cognition & Perception, Information & Intelligent Systems and Linguistics) and as a member of the Language and Communication panel at NIH. He served a four-year term as Associate Editor at Psychological Science, has been on the editorial boards of major journals (Cognitive Psychology, JEP:LMC) and is a Consulting Editor at Psychological Review. His awards include appointment as John and Ruth Hazel Associate Professor at Harvard University, a W.N. Reynolds Leave from the University of North Carolina and a James McKeen Cattell Fund Sabbatical Award that is supporting his visit to USC this semester.
    Dr. Gordon's program of research focuses on uncovering the psychological basis of language comprehension and production, with a particular focus on the nature of discourse coherence and on the interaction of discourse-level processing and lower-level processes such as word recognition. His research on the processing of written and spoken language has been highly interdisciplinary, including long-term collaborations with researchers trained in computer science, linguistics and neuroscience, as well as researchers with clinical specializations. His recent research has involved coordinated use of behavioral and neural methods for studying how language processing is coordinated with perception, attention, memory and motor control, and has additionally involved development of eye-tracking and computational-linguistic methods for studying cognitive and interpersonal processes in normal and impaired populations.

    Host: Shrikanth Narayanan

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Tanya Acevedo-Lam/EE-Systems

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  • Security and Privacy of Non-Volatile Memories- Vunerabilities, Attack Models and Preventions

    Mon, Apr 11, 2016 @ 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Swaroop Ghosh, Professor, University of South Florida

    Talk Title: Security and Privacy of Non-Volatile Memories- Vulnerabilities, Attack Models and Preventions

    Abstract: Non-volatile memories (NVM) such as Spin-Transfer Torque RAM (STTRAM), Resistive RAM and Domain Wall Memory have drawn significant attention due to complete elimination of bitcell leakage. In addition to plethora of benefits such as density, non-volatility, low-power and high-speed, majority of NVMs are also compatible with CMOS technology enabling easy integration. NVMs are particularly interesting for a class of Internet-of-Things (IoT) that are normally OFF but require instant ON experience. Although promising, I will show that NVMs bring new security and privacy challenges that were absent in their conventional volatile memory counterparts. Assuring data integrity and privacy against malicious attacks is particularly critical on deployed systems that are hard to maintain and enforce physical security. I will present two aspects to NVM security in Last Level Cache (LLC) using STTRAM as test case:
    (i) Data integrity which pertains to data corruption by malicious attack with the intention to launch denial-of-service. Such attacks exploit the fact that NVMs are fundamentally susceptible to ambient parameters such as magnetic field and temperature. I will describe these vulnerabilities and attack models, and, propose two micro-architectural techniques to assure data integrity under attack namely, cache bypassing and checkpointing. These techniques allow seamless computation in presence of attack at minimal design overhead.
    (ii) Data privacy which pertains to sensitive data such as keys and passwords being compromised. Storage such as Hard Disk Drive (HDD) has been the non-volatile part of memory system traditionally protected by encryption. Although effective, the latency associated with encryption makes it non-trivial for application in higher levels of memory stack such as LLC. I will present the vulnerabilities and attack models, and, propose two low-overhead techniques to maintain data privacy namely, Semi Non-Volatile Memory which is similar to NVM but with very low retention time so that the data vanishes after power is turned OFF, and, irreversible erasure of data at power down using residual charge from power rail.

    Biography: Swaroop Ghosh (S'04, SM'13) received his B.E. (Hons.) from IIT, Roorkee (2000), M.S. from University of Cincinnati (2004) and Ph.D. from Purdue University (2008). He joined USF in Fall 2012. Dr. Ghosh was senior research and development engineer in Advanced Design, Intel Corp from 2008 to 2012 where pioneered 32nm and 22nm SRAM and eDRAM designs. His research interests lie at the intersection of circuits, micro-architecture and hardware security. He is a senior member of IEEE.
    Dr. Ghosh is serving as Associate Editor of IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS-I and Senior Editorial Board member of IEEE JOURNAL ON EMERGING AND SELECTED TOPICS IN CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS. He has served in the technical program committees of DAC, DATE, ICCAD, ISLPED, HOST, Nanoarch, VLSI Design, ISQED, ASQED, and VLSI-SOC. He is a recipient of DARPA Young Faculty Award (2015), ACM SIGDA Outstanding New Faculty Award (2016), USF Outstanding Research Achievement Award (2015) and USF College of Engineering Outstanding Research Achievement Award (2015).

    Host: Professor Murali Annavaram

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Suzanne Wong

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Apr 11, 2016 @ 12:30 PM - 01:49 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Peter Wang, PhD., Associate Professor of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego (UCSD)

    Talk Title: Molecular Engineering for cellular imaging and reprogramming

    Biography: Dr. Yingxiao (Peter) Wang obtained his bachelor's and master's degrees in Mechanics and Fluid Mechanics from Peking University, Beijing, P.R. China, in 1992 and 1996, respectively. He received his Ph.D. degree in Bioengineering from the University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering in 2002 and continued his postdoctoral work at UC San Diego working under Bioengineering Professor Shu Chien and Professor Roger Y. Tsien in the Department of Pharmacology. Before joining the UC San Diego faculty in 2012, he was an associate professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Department of Bioengineering and a full-time faculty member in the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois. He was also affiliated with the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, Neuroscience Program, the Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, and Institute of Genomic Biology at UIUC. Dr. Wang is the recipient of the Wallace H. Coulter Early Career Award (both Phase I and Phase II), the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and National Institutes of Health Independent Scientist Award. His research is supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and private foundations. Dr. Wang teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on molecular engineering, live cell imaging, and mechanobiology.

    Host: K. Kirk Shung, PhD

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • EE 598 Cyber-Physical Systems Seminar Series

    Mon, Apr 11, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Sudhakar Yalamanchili, Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology

    Talk Title: New Rules: Sustaining Performance Scaling in a Physical World

    Abstract: As industry moves to increasingly small feature sizes, performance scaling will become increasingly dominated by the physics of the computing environment. Sustaining performance scaling will require understanding, characterizing, and collaboratively managing the multi-physics and multi-scale (nanoseconds to milliseconds) transient interactions between the delivery, dissipation, and removal (cooling) of power and their impact on system level performance. There are fundamental trade-offs to be made in processor design at the microarchitectural level between performance, energy/power, reliability, and packaging. In particular, these tradeoffs become increasingly pronounced with heterogeneity and diversity of application workloads. This talk will describe how interacting physical phenomena, e.g., thermal coupling, i) limits performance scaling, ii) drives application-driven microarchitecture-level tradeoffs, and iii) leads to operational principles for energy-efficient heterogeneous many core architectures. In particular, the talk will cover some exemplar implementations on modern integrated CPU-GPU architectures.

    Biography: Sudhakar Yalamanchili earned his Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Upon graduation, he joined Honeywell's Systems and Research Center in Minneapolis working on embedded multiprocessor architectures. He joined the ECE faculty at Georgia Tech in 1989 where he is now a Regents Professor and Joseph M. Pettit Professor of Computer Engineering. He is the author of two texts on VHDL-based simulation modeling and synthesis, and co-author with J. Duato and L. Ni, of Interconnection Networks: An Engineering Approach, Morgan Kaufman, 2003. His current research foci lie in addressing the software challenges of heterogeneous architectures and solutions to power and thermal issues in many core architectures and systems. Since 2003 he has been a Co-Director of the NSF Industry University Cooperative Research Center on Experimental Computer Systems at Georgia Tech. Dr. Yalamanchili regularly contributes professionally on editorial boards and program committees in high performance computing and computer architecture. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

    Host: Paul Bogdan

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Estela Lopez

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  • Analytic Reconstructions for MEG and EEG (Lecture I)

    Mon, Apr 11, 2016 @ 04:30 PM - 05:50 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Thanasis Fokas, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge & Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California

    Talk Title: Analytic Reconstructions for MEG and EEG (Lecture I)

    Series: Three Part Lecture Series

    Abstract: Analytical reconstructions as well as appropriate mnumerical implementations for the important imaging techniques of Magneto-encephalography (MEG) and Electro-ecephalography (EEG) will be reviewed. The numerical implementations of MEG and EEG are based on state of the art codes for the numerical evaluation of certain auxiliary functions appearing in the relevant analytical formulae. The effectiveness of reconstructions of the neuronal current using either real EEG or real MEG data will be demonstrated.


    Biography: Thanasis Fokas, Chair of Nonlinear mathematical science at the University of Cambridge and Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering here at USC, will give a series of lectures on Magneto-Electro-Encephalography, which will be introduced by Professor Richard Leahy. The work of Thanasis FOKAS and collaborators has resolved completely the following important question in this area that was open since the fundamental work of Helmohltz: which part of the neuronal current can be computed from the knowledge of either MEG or EEG data?


    Next scheduled lectures in this series:

    -Lecture II: Wed., April 13, 2016, 4:00 - 5:20PM, EEB 132

    -Lecture III: Mon., April 18, 2016, 4:00 - 5:20PM, EEB 132


    Host: Prof. Richard Leahy

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia White

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  • CS Colloquium: Kobbi Nissim (Harvard University) - Privacy: From Theory to Practice

    Tue, Apr 12, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Kobbi Nissim, Dept. of Computer Science, Ben-Gurion University and Center for Research on Computation and Society, Harvard University

    Talk Title: Privacy: From Theory to Practice

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    The treatment of privacy in data analysis has taken a dramatic shift a little more than a decade ago - as failures of traditional privacy preserving techniques were beginning to accumulate, a theoretical, foundational approach to privacy emerged. A central concept in this theoretical treatment is "differential privacy", a definition of privacy in the context of data analysis that has concrete provable privacy consequences. Differential privacy became to be a rich, fast evolving framework for developing privacy preserving algorithms and for studying some of the fundamental properties of privacy. Moreover, differential privacy proved to interact fruitfully with many other research areas, and even to influence applications that are (seemingly) not related to privacy. With a mature theoretical basis, differential privacy is now at prime time for inclusion in real-world systems.

    We will look into the intuition behind differential privacy, review some of is theory, and some of the challenges towards using differential privacy in practice. In particular, we will focus on a new legal-technological methodology for making rigorous claims that differential privacy satisfies existing legal privacy regulations.

    The talk would be self-contained and no prior background on privacy would be assumed.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • USC Stem Cell Seminar: Henry Kronenberg, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard

    Tue, Apr 12, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Henry Kronenberg, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard

    Talk Title: Growth-associated skeletal stem cells

    Series: Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC Distinguished Speakers Series

    Abstract: Early cells of the osteoblast lineage in post-natal live express genes that are also expressed in mesenchymal condensations during
    development. We used collagen II-creERt and SOX9-creERt to mark these cells. Over time, they become osteoblasts, osteocytes, adipocytes, chondrocytes and marrow stromal cells. The fates of these precursors can be influenced by, for example, administration of parathyroid hormone.

    Host: Francesca Mariani

    More Info: https://calendar.usc.edu/event/speaker_henry_kronenberg_massachusetts_general_hospitalharvard?utm_campaign=widget&utm_medium=widget&utm_source=USC+Event+Calendar%3A+Beta#.VvGSYXDFl04
    Webcast: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-semina

    Location: Eli & Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Resch. (BCC) - First Floor Conference Room

    WebCast Link: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-seminar

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Cristy Lytal/USC Stem Cell

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  • Communications, Networks & Systems (CommNetS) Seminar

    Tue, Apr 12, 2016 @ 02:30 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Radhakishan Baheti, National Science Foundation

    Talk Title: NSF Programs in Energy, Power, Robotics, and Cyber-Physical Systems

    Series: CommNetS

    Abstract: The goal of the presentation is to provide an update on National Science Foundation (NSF) funding opportunities in the area of Energy, Power, Control and Networked Systems research and education. Research projects in power systems with renewable energy integration, power electronics, and open-access testbeds will be presented. The presentation will include NSF programs in Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), and National Robotics Initiative. The CPS program brings together researchers from computations, communications, and control disciplines to address important engineering problems.

    Biography: Dr. Radhakishan Baheti is a Program Director for Energy, Power, Control and Networks Program in the Division of Electrical, Communications, and Cyber Systems at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Baheti received the B.S. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering in India from VRCE Nagpur, and from BITS Pilani, respectively. In 1970, he came to USA and received M.S. in Information and Computer Science from University of Oklahoma and Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Oregon State University. In 1976, Dr. Baheti joined the Control Engineering Laboratory of GE Corporate Research and Development Center in Schenectady, NY. His work focused on advanced multivariable control for jet engines, computer- aided control system design, vision-based robots for precision welding, and Kalman filtering. Dr. Baheti and his colleagues received IR-100 award for robotic welding vision system. He has organized a series of educational workshops for GE engineers that resulted in innovative product developments and contributed to enhance university collaborations with GE business divisions. In 1989, Dr. Baheti joined NSF as a Program Director in the Division of Electrical and Communications Systems. His contributions include the development of NSF initiatives on "Combined Research and Curriculum Development", "Semiconductor Manufacturing", and NSF/EPRI Program on "Intelligent Control". In addition, he started the NSF Program "Research Experience for Teachers (RET)" to involve middle and high school teachers in engineering research that can be transferred to pre-college classrooms. Recently, he is involved in cyber-physical systems, science of learning, robotics, and open/remote access engineering test-beds for integration of research and education. He has served as associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, member of the Control Systems Board of Governors, chair for Public Information Committee, and awards chair for the American Automatic Control Council (AACC). He received "Distinguished Member Award" from the IEEE Control Systems Society. In 2013, he received "Outstanding Leadership and Service Award" from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Head Association. He was elected a Fellow of IEEE and a Fellow of AAAS.

    Host: Prof. Ketan Savla

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • Epstein Institute Seminar - ISE 651

    Tue, Apr 12, 2016 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Andrew Schaefer, Rice University

    Talk Title: How to Value a Prearranged Paired Kidney Exchange?

    Host: Dr. Suvrajeet Sen

    More Information: April 12, 2016.pdf

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Michele ISE

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  • CS Colloquium: Qixing Huang (Toyata Technical Institute Chicago) - Visual Computing Using Big 3D Data

    Tue, Apr 12, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Qixing Huang, Toyata Technical Institute Chicago

    Talk Title: Visual Computing Using Big 3D Data

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Over the past decade, the quantity of accessible visual data has undergone unprecedented expansion. This data is not only vast but also exists within numerous modalities such as images, videos, and 3D models. While researchers have aptly exploited the inflation of these first two areas, the significant growth in 3D data has been predominantly overlooked. In this talk, I will present algorithms that utilize big 3D data to accomplish many previously hard or even impossible tasks in visual computing. These include reconstructing complete 3D models from single images, identifying meaningful correspondences between drastically different objects (e.g., between an elephant and a cat) as well as extracting semantic parts of an object without supervision. The guiding principle is to establish high-quality maps for aggregating and propagating information. I will discuss fundamental map computation tools for large-scale datasets.

    Biography: Qixing 'Peter' Huang is currently a research assistant professor at the Toyata Technical Institute in Chicago. He obtained his PhD in Computer Science from Stanford University and his MS and BS in Computer Science from Tsinghua University. He has also worked at Adobe Research and Google Research, where he developed some of the key technologies for Google Street View. Dr. Huang's research spans the fields of computer vision, computer graphics, and machine learning. In particular, he is interested in designing new algorithms that process and analyze big geometric data (e.g., 3D shapes/scenes). He is also interested in statistical data analysis, compressive sensing, low-rank matrix recovery, and large-scale optimization, which provides theoretical foundation for his research. Qixing has published extensively at SIGGRAPH, CVPR and ICCV, and has received grants from NSF and various industry gifts. He also received the best paper award at the Symposium on Geometry Processing 2013.

    Host: CS Department

    More Info: https://bluejeans.com/345837634

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • The Fundamental Limits of Data and Metadata Privacy

    Wed, Apr 13, 2016 @ 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Peter Kairouz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Talk Title: The Fundamental Limits of Data and Metadata Privacy

    Abstract: With the ability to surf the web efficiently comes the danger of being monitored. There is an increasing tension between the need to share data and the need to preserve the privacy of Internet users. The need for privacy appears in two main contexts: the data privacy context, as in when individuals want to share their personal data with a potentially malicious service provider or when a trusted service provider wants to release sensitive information about individuals, and the metadata privacy context, as in when individuals want to broadcast information on a social network without the fear of being judged by friends, the public or authorities.

    In the metadata privacy context, anonymity is achieved by controlling the way information spreads over a network. In the first half of my talk, I will introduce a novel anonymous messaging protocol (called adaptive diffusion) and show that it spreads a message quickly over a network while "perfectly" hiding authorship information from a powerful adversary with global access to metadata.

    In the data privacy context, privacy is achieved by randomizing the data before releasing it. This leads to a fundamental trade-off between privacy and utility. In the second half of my talk, I will present a new class of privacy mechanisms (called staircase mechanisms) and show that they achieve the optimal privacy-utility trade-off under various settings of interest.

    Biography: Peter Kairouz is a PHD student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. For his masters, he was mainly interested in signal processing and digital communications. He interned twice at Qualcomm (in 2012 and 2013), and was awarded The 2012 Roberto Padovani Scholarship from Qualcomm's Research Center. For his PhD, he chose to work on data and metadata privacy, winning the Best Paper Award at ACM SIGMETRICS 2015. He recently interned at Google, where he designed privacy-aware machine learning algorithms. His primary research interests include privacy enhancing technologies, machine learning, and wireless communications.


    Host: Professor Rahul Jain

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Suzanne Wong

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  • Algorithms for Parameter Estimation in Quantitative MRI

    Wed, Apr 13, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Marcus Björk, PhD, Division of Systems & Control, Uppsala University

    Talk Title: Algorithms for Parameter Estimation in Quantitative MRI

    Series: Medical Imaging Seminar Series

    Abstract: Through advanced signal processing, MRI can provide quantitative measures of tissue-specific physical properties. The optimization problems solved in quantitative MRI are typically nonlinear, and require intelligent and application-specific algorithms to avoid suboptimal local minima. In this presentation, several methods for efficiently solving different parameter estimation problems in MRI, such as multi-component T2 relaxometry, and minimizing banding artifacts in bSSFP MRI due to field inhomogeneity, are presented. Finally, I will present some interesting problems for the future. The corresponding PhD thesis is available at:
    http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-246537


    Biography: Dr. Marcus Bjork is a Researcher in the division of Systems and Control at Uppsala University, in Professor Peter Stoica's group. He defended his PhD thesis last year. His main field of research is signal processing, with application to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). By modeling the MR signal and estimating the model parameters from data, measures of tissue-specific physical properties can be obtained. The optimization problems solved are typically nonlinear, and require intelligent and application-specific algorithms to avoid suboptimal local minima. Designing such algorithms is a challenging research problem.

    Host: Professor Krishna Nayak

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia White

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  • Analytic Reconstructions for MEG and EEG (Lecture II)

    Wed, Apr 13, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:20 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Thanasis Fokas, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge & Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California

    Talk Title: Analytic Reconstructions for MEG and EEG (Lecture II)

    Series: Three Part Lecture Series

    Abstract: Analytical reconstructions as well as appropriate mnumerical implementations for the important imaging techniques of Magneto-encephalography (MEG) and Electro-ecephalography (EEG) will be reviewed. The numerical implementations of MEG and EEG are based on state of the art codes for the numerical evaluation of certain auxiliary functions appearing in the relevant analytical formulae. The effectiveness of reconstructions of the neuronal current using either real EEG or real MEG data will be demonstrated.



    Biography: Thanasis Fokas, Chair of Nonlinear mathematical science at the University of Cambridge and Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering here at USC, will give a series of lectures on Magneto-Electro-Encephalography, which will be introduced by Professor Richard Leahy. The work of Thanasis FOKAS and collaborators has resolved completely the following important question in this area that was open since the fundamental work of Helmohltz: which part of the neuronal current can be computed from the knowledge of either MEG or EEG data?


    Next and last scheduled lecture in this series:

    -Lecture III: Mon., April 18, 2016, 4:00 - 5:20PM, EEB 132

    Host: Richard Leahy

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia White

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  • Remote Sensing with Multiple Satellite Sensors for Interdisciplinary Science Investigation of Artic Sea Ice and Halogen Chemical Processes Dr. Son V. Nghiem, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Wed, Apr 13, 2016 @ 05:30 PM - 07:30 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Organizations

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Son V. Nghiem, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Dr.

    Talk Title: Remote Sensing with Multiple Satellite Sensors for Interdisciplinary Science Investigation of Artic Sea Ice and Halogen Chemical Processes

    Abstract: Interested in geosciences and/or remote sensing? The local section of the IEEE Geosciences and Remote Sensing Society Chapter invites you to our first meeting of the year at 5:30pm on Wed 13-Apr-2016 on the Caltech campus in Pasadena. In this distinguished lecture event, Dr Son Nghiem of JPL will talk about remote sensing with multiple satellite sensors for interdisciplinary science investigation of Arctic sea ice and halogen chemical processes. The event is also an opportunity to get to know engineers from JPL, local industry, and other local universities. For details please see http://sites.ieee.org/metrola-grss
    Host: IEEE METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES SECTION GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING SOCIETY (GRSS) CHAPTER

    More Information: 2016-GRSS-4-13-16-AGENDA_v2.pdf

    Location: Sharp Lecture Hall, 155 Arms Laboratory Caltech Campus Pasadena, California

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

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  • MFD - Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Lyman L. Handy Series: Steven Ringel

    Thu, Apr 14, 2016 @ 12:45 PM - 02:00 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Steven Ringel, Univ. of Colorado

    Talk Title: To Be Announced

    Series: MFD Lyman L. Handy

    Host: Prof. Jongseung Yoon

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Jason Ordonez

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  • Materials Science for III-V/Si Multijunction Solar Cells

    Thu, Apr 14, 2016 @ 12:45 PM - 01:45 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Professor Steven A. Ringel, The Ohio State University

    Talk Title: Materials Science for III-V/Si Multijunction Solar Cells

    Series: Lyman Handy Colloquia

    Abstract: Creating a cost-effective, implementable photovoltaic (solar cell) technology is a great and challenging problem for electronic materials research. The premium on utilizing the solar spectrum efficiently is met in importance by the need to do so at low cost and in a manufacturing-friendly, large-scale format. For many years, these often conflicting goals have motivated the desire to integrate high efficiency, III-V compound semiconductor photovoltaics, with their proven high solar energy conversion efficiencies (concentrator multijunction efficiencies exceed 45%), with Si and its existing, low-cost manufacturing industry. There has been tremendous progress toward the creation of Si-based multijunction solar cells in recent years, attributable largely to solving defect issues related to the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductors (GaAs, GaAsP, GaP)
    with group IV substrates (Si, SiGe, Ge). By achieving a defect-controlled III-V/IV heterovalent interface, one can subsequently grow high quality III-V solar cells on top of
    the substrate and depending on choice of material, one can also make use of the Si growth substrate itself as a sub-cell within a true III-V/Si multijunction design. This
    presentation will focus on our efforts to develop Si-based tandem and triple junction solar cells in which the Si substrate serves a dual use -“ as a low cost growth substrate
    and as a high efficiency bottom junction for these unique multijunctions. Indeed this Si-based design also captures the ideal set of bandgaps for maximum efficiency and
    therefore has the potential to solve the long-standing conundrum of performance and cost goals for photovoltaics.

    Host: Professor Jongseung Yoon

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Martin Olekszyk

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  • 2016 Viterbi Lecture

    Thu, Apr 14, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Norman Abramson, Professor Emeritus / University of Hawaii

    Talk Title: ALOHA to the Web

    Series: Viterbi Lecture

    Abstract: Wireless access to the Internet today is provided predominantly by random access ALOHA channels connecting a wide variety of user devices. ALOHA channels were first analyzed, implemented and demonstrated in the ALOHA network at the University of Hawaii in June, 1971. Information Theory has provided a constant guide for the design of more efficient channels and network architectures for ALOHA access to the web.

    In this talk we examine the architecture of networks using ALOHA channels and the statistics of traffic within these channels. That traffic is composed of user and app oriented information augmented by protocol information inserted for the benefit of network operation. A simple application of basic Information Theory can provide a surprising guide to the amount of protocol information required for typical web applications.

    We contrast this theoretical guide of the amount of protocol information required with measurements of protocol generated information taken on real network traffic. Wireless access to the web is not as efficient as you might guess.

    Biography: Norman Abramson received an A.B. in physics from Harvard College in 1953, an M.A. in physics from UCLA in 1955, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford in 1958.

    He was an assistant professor and associate professor of electrical engineering at Stanford from 1958 to 1965. From 1967 to 1995 he was Professor of Electrical Engineering, Professor of Information and Computer Science, Chairman of the Department of Information and Computer Science, and Director of the ALOHA System at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. He is now Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering at the University of Hawaii. He has held visiting appointments at Berkeley (1965), Harvard (1966) and MIT (1980).

    Abramson is the recipient of several major awards for his work on random access channels and the ALOHA Network, the first wireless data network. The ALOHA Network went into operation in Hawaii in June, 1971. Among these awards are the Eduard Rhein Foundation Technology Award (Munich, 2000), the IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal (Philadelphia, 2007) and the NEC C&C Foundation Award (Tokyo, 2011).

    Host: Professor Sandeep Gupta

    More Info: https://bluejeans.com/662702745

    More Information: 2015-16 DLS Postcard.jpg

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mayumi Thrasher

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Fri, Apr 15, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Lauren Stadler, Rice University

    Talk Title: Elucidating the Impact of Dissolved Oxygen Wastewater Treatment on Pharmaceutical Fate

    Abstract: See Attachment

    Host: Dr. Adam Smith

    More Information: Stadler Announcement.pdf

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • NL Seminar- Decoding Neuro-Semantic Representation of Stories across Languages

    Fri, Apr 15, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Morteza Dehghani (USC), USC/ISI

    Talk Title: Decoding Neuro-Semantic Representation of Stories across Languages

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: Understanding how conceptual knowledge is represented and organized in the human brain is one of the core problems of cognitive science, and many studies have aimed at exploring and understanding the similarities of neuro-semantic representations of concepts. A general approach that has been particularly fruitful in this domain is the investigation of the relationship between various corpus statistics of words and neural activity during exposure to those words. In this work, we examine the neuro-semantic representations of stories across three different languages. We demonstrate that using new advances in vector-based representation of text and paragraphs, fMRI signals can be reliably mapped to story representations. We also show that such representations can capture common neuro-semantic representation of stories across different languages. Finally, performing search-light analysis using over a billion regressions, we show that activation patterns in the default mode network of the brain are the most reliable features for decoding stories.



    Biography: Morteza is an Assistant Professor of psychology, computer science and the Brain and Creativity Institute at University of Southern California. His research spans the boundary between psychology and artificial intelligence, as does his education. His work investigates properties of cognition by using documents of the social discourse, such as narratives, social media, transcriptions of speeches and news articles, in conjunction to behavioral studies.

    Host: Xing Shi and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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  • Repeating EventDepartment of Astronautical Engineering: Presentation on Lessons from Columbia by Matthew Melis

    Fri, Apr 15, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Melis, NASA Glenn Research Center

    Talk Title: Lessons from Columbia A Decade Later

    Abstract: Matt Melis provides a detailed look into the inner workings of the Space Shuttle and a behind the scenes perspective on the impact analysis and testing done for the Columbia Accident Investigation and NASA's Return to Flight programs. His presentation is full of rich, still and motion picture imagery, and, although technical, is easily understood by all audiences. In addition, highlights from recent Shuttle missions are presented demonstrating how NASA conducted its operations differently and more safely, post Columbia, through better imagery, better analysis, and enhanced best practices.

    Biography: Matt received both a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Engineering Mechanics from Michigan State University and has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center for thirty two years. His primary area of focus is in advanced finite element modeling and analysis methods including nonlinear and dynamic impact loading. Trained in engineering mechanics, he has been recognized for expertise in actively cooled structures, stress analysis, ballistic impact research, and multi physics analysis during his tenure at the Research Center. He has worked on numerous aeronautics and space programs for the agency including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and NASA's Exploration Program. In the four and one half years that followed the Columbia accident, Matt was assigned full time to working the Columbia Accident Investigation and the Shuttle Return to Flight Program as technical lead of the NASA Glenn Ballistic Impact team. Most recent Matt has worked on landing impact testing of various design concepts for the Orion crew module and is currently a program sub-element lead for a cryogenic fluid management program at NASA Glenn.

    In addition to his technical commitments, Matt also devotes significant effort to public outreach and teaching for NASA at all levels of education as well as conferences pertaining to Ballistic Impact Research, The Columbia Accident Investigation, NASA's Return to Flight and the Space Shuttle Program. Organizations he has spoken to include: The National Transportation and Safety Board, The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dartmouth College, The Canadian Royal Astronomical Society, Ontario Science Center, Ivey Business School in Canada, The University of Reykjavik, Iceland, The American Society for Metals, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic, and the London Science Festival.



    Host: Department of Astronautical Engineering, Ad Astra Student Society, VGSA

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

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    Posted By: Norma Perry

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  • Repeating EventDepartment of Astronautical Engineering: Presentation on Lessons from Columbia by Matthew Melis

    Sat, Apr 16, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Melis, NASA Glenn Research Center

    Talk Title: Lessons from Columbia A Decade Later

    Abstract: Matt Melis provides a detailed look into the inner workings of the Space Shuttle and a behind the scenes perspective on the impact analysis and testing done for the Columbia Accident Investigation and NASA's Return to Flight programs. His presentation is full of rich, still and motion picture imagery, and, although technical, is easily understood by all audiences. In addition, highlights from recent Shuttle missions are presented demonstrating how NASA conducted its operations differently and more safely, post Columbia, through better imagery, better analysis, and enhanced best practices.

    Biography: Matt received both a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Engineering Mechanics from Michigan State University and has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center for thirty two years. His primary area of focus is in advanced finite element modeling and analysis methods including nonlinear and dynamic impact loading. Trained in engineering mechanics, he has been recognized for expertise in actively cooled structures, stress analysis, ballistic impact research, and multi physics analysis during his tenure at the Research Center. He has worked on numerous aeronautics and space programs for the agency including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and NASA's Exploration Program. In the four and one half years that followed the Columbia accident, Matt was assigned full time to working the Columbia Accident Investigation and the Shuttle Return to Flight Program as technical lead of the NASA Glenn Ballistic Impact team. Most recent Matt has worked on landing impact testing of various design concepts for the Orion crew module and is currently a program sub-element lead for a cryogenic fluid management program at NASA Glenn.

    In addition to his technical commitments, Matt also devotes significant effort to public outreach and teaching for NASA at all levels of education as well as conferences pertaining to Ballistic Impact Research, The Columbia Accident Investigation, NASA's Return to Flight and the Space Shuttle Program. Organizations he has spoken to include: The National Transportation and Safety Board, The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dartmouth College, The Canadian Royal Astronomical Society, Ontario Science Center, Ivey Business School in Canada, The University of Reykjavik, Iceland, The American Society for Metals, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic, and the London Science Festival.



    Host: Department of Astronautical Engineering, Ad Astra Student Society, VGSA

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Norma Perry

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  • Repeating EventDepartment of Astronautical Engineering: Presentation on Lessons from Columbia by Matthew Melis

    Sun, Apr 17, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Melis, NASA Glenn Research Center

    Talk Title: Lessons from Columbia A Decade Later

    Abstract: Matt Melis provides a detailed look into the inner workings of the Space Shuttle and a behind the scenes perspective on the impact analysis and testing done for the Columbia Accident Investigation and NASA's Return to Flight programs. His presentation is full of rich, still and motion picture imagery, and, although technical, is easily understood by all audiences. In addition, highlights from recent Shuttle missions are presented demonstrating how NASA conducted its operations differently and more safely, post Columbia, through better imagery, better analysis, and enhanced best practices.

    Biography: Matt received both a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Engineering Mechanics from Michigan State University and has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center for thirty two years. His primary area of focus is in advanced finite element modeling and analysis methods including nonlinear and dynamic impact loading. Trained in engineering mechanics, he has been recognized for expertise in actively cooled structures, stress analysis, ballistic impact research, and multi physics analysis during his tenure at the Research Center. He has worked on numerous aeronautics and space programs for the agency including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and NASA's Exploration Program. In the four and one half years that followed the Columbia accident, Matt was assigned full time to working the Columbia Accident Investigation and the Shuttle Return to Flight Program as technical lead of the NASA Glenn Ballistic Impact team. Most recent Matt has worked on landing impact testing of various design concepts for the Orion crew module and is currently a program sub-element lead for a cryogenic fluid management program at NASA Glenn.

    In addition to his technical commitments, Matt also devotes significant effort to public outreach and teaching for NASA at all levels of education as well as conferences pertaining to Ballistic Impact Research, The Columbia Accident Investigation, NASA's Return to Flight and the Space Shuttle Program. Organizations he has spoken to include: The National Transportation and Safety Board, The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dartmouth College, The Canadian Royal Astronomical Society, Ontario Science Center, Ivey Business School in Canada, The University of Reykjavik, Iceland, The American Society for Metals, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic, and the London Science Festival.



    Host: Department of Astronautical Engineering, Ad Astra Student Society, VGSA

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Norma Perry

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  • Molecular Computing: A New Frontier for Interdisciplinary Engineering

    Mon, Apr 18, 2016 @ 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Matthew Lakin, Professor, University of New Mexico

    Talk Title: Molecular Computing: A New Frontier for Interdisciplinary Engineering

    Abstract: Biological systems have evolved complex information storage and processing capabilities. These involve information-carrying DNA and RNA molecules as well as sophisticated molecular machines, such as the ribosome, that use this information to produce the proteins that drive many cellular processes. The field of molecular computing aims to achieve similarly precise, programmable control over the structure and dynamics of nanoscale computing systems, drawing on approaches from computer engineering, computer science, biology, and biochemistry. For example, a molecular computer might be designed to patrol the body, autonomously diagnosing and treating individual cells, to prevent or cure disease. In this talk I will describe my research on the design, verification, and implementation of DNA-based molecular computing architectures. I will describe my work on software tools and verification techniques as well as my work on wet lab experiments.

    Biography: Matthew Lakin obtained his B.A. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Cambridge. After graduating he worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Biological Computation Group at Microsoft Research in Cambridge. From 2011 to 2015, he was a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Computer Science at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Lakin is currently a Research Assistant Professor in the Departments of Computer Science and Chemical & Biological Engineering at the University of New Mexico and is also a member of the UNM Center for Biomedical Engineering. Dr. Lakin works on theoretical and experimental aspects of molecular computing using DNA. He builds software tools for the design of molecular computers, works on reasoning techniques to understand and verify their behavior, constructs experimental systems that exhibit novel dynamic behaviors, and works towards applications of molecular computers to monitor and control biological and chemical systems.

    Host: Professor Alice Parker

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Suzanne Wong

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  • AI SEMINAR

    Mon, Apr 18, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Peter Fennell, Postdoc at Univ. of Limerick, Ireland

    Talk Title: Information diffusion on Twitter: a hazard rates approach

    Series: AI Seminar

    Abstract: Online social networks provide a digital footprint of the manner in which people interact in their everyday lives. Information diffuses through online social networks as a result of users creating and sharing information, and such diffusions are highly complex because of the nature of individuals and because of the structure of the network that connects them.

    In this talk, I will discuss an approach to understanding information diffusion on online social networks, with specific reference to a case study on Twitter. Here, we use hazard rates to quantify how individuals respond to information, and show the non-linear nature of the response of individuals to multiple signals from their peers. Such hazard rates can be implemented in mathematical frameworks for understanding and predictive purposes, allowing us to analyze the information diffusion and its dependence on the structure of the online social network. I will discuss the importance of empirical observations of large social network datasets in constructing mathematical models of information diffusion, and the necessity of such realistic models for both prediction and analysis.


    Biography: Peter Fennell is a postdoctoral researcher in the Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics in the University of Limerick, Ireland. Peter's research focuses on diffusive processes on complex networks, and in using probabilistic frameworks to understand such processes and their interplay with the network through which they spread. Recently, Peter has been awarded a James S. McDonnell postdoctoral fellowship to further his research in the area of information diffusion on online social networks. This project will combine extensive empirical examinations of online social networks along with mathematical modeling to gain an understanding of the underlying mechanisms behind information diffusion

    Host: Kristina Lerman

    Webcast: http://webcasterms1.isi.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=336e5bb472104d289de47f5e8ef7331c1

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 1135 - 11th fl Large CR

    WebCast Link: http://webcasterms1.isi.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=336e5bb472104d289de47f5e8ef7331c1d

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Alma Nava / Information Sciences Institute

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Apr 18, 2016 @ 12:30 PM - 01:49 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Judy Pa, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics Laboratory of Neuro Imaging

    Talk Title: Multimodal neuroimaging to detect early neural dysfunction and measure neural enhancement in Alzheimer's disease

    Abstract: Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of cognitive impairment in older adults. Over 5 million people in the US are affected and this number is expected to triple by 2050. In concert with clinical trials, identifying effective ways to detect early neural changes and to measure longitudinal change in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease is critically needed. In this presentation, I will discuss my research aimed at using multimodal neuroimaging methods to detect early changes in vulnerable brain regions important for executive function and memory and how these neural alterations affect large-scale brain networks. Ongoing studies focus on the role of regional Alzheimer's pathology using PET and network integrity using MRI and how these changes may be remediated through clinical interventions, like exercise in older adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, I will discuss upcoming plans to integrate new technology, equipment, and ideas to further enhance this research at USC.

    Biography: Judy Pa is an assistant professor at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics in the Keck School of Medicine and the department of Neurology. Judy's research is focused on identifying individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease using multimodal neuroimaging techniques, understanding how Alzheimer's pathology impacts brain function in the living brain, and developing ways to remediate cognitive and brain dysfunction using modifiable lifestyle factors, like exercise. Her research program is supported by the National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Association, and Springer Medical Fund.

    Judy is dedicated to teaching and enjoys training and mentoring students in USC's Neuroscience Graduate Program, Keck School of Medicine, and new Neuroimaging and Informatics Masters of Science program.

    The Pa Lab is now recruiting intellectually curious and motivated members. Please email Judy directly to inquire about research internships or lab rotations.


    Host: K. Kirk Shung, PhD

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • CS Colloquium: Julia Rubin (MIT CSAIL) -The Secret Life of Mobile Applications

    Mon, Apr 18, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Julia Rubin, MIT CSAIL

    Talk Title: The Secret Life of Mobile Applications

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    As software becomes increasingly more complex and yet more pervasive, poor understanding of software behavior compromises the quality and the integrity of software systems that we use. In this talk, I will show that automated analysis techniques can help to identify and reason about software behavior characteristics that matter to humans. After a brief overview of my current research directions, I will focus on techniques for identifying privacy violations in mobile applications, i.e., leakages of sensitive information such as user location and shopping preferences. I will present a set of solutions that rely on contextual, functional and usage-based clues for improving the accuracy of leakage detection and for distinguishing between "legitimate" and "illegitimate" information distribution patterns.

    Biography: Julia Rubin is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the EECS department at MIT. Prior to that, she was a Research Staff Member and, part of the time, a manager at IBM Research in Haifa, Israel. She received her PhD in Computer Science from the University of Toronto, Canada in 2014. Julia's research interests are in software engineering, program analysis and software security, focusing on improving the quality and the integrity of modern software systems. Her recent work in this area won an ACM Distinguished Paper Award at ASE, two Best Paper Awards, at SPLC and CSMR, and was nominated for Facebook's Internet Defense Prize at the USENIX Security Symposium.

    Host: CS Department

    More Info: https://bluejeans.com/706751366

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 102

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • EE 598 Cyber-Physical Systems Seminar Series

    Mon, Apr 18, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Walid Saad, Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech

    Talk Title: Behavioral Game Theory in Cyber-Physical Systems: Frameworks and Applications

    Abstract: Cyber-physical systems (CPSs) are characterized by three key features: heterogeneity, in terms of technology, services, and human interactions, dynamics, in terms of rapidly varying environments and uncertainty at both the cyber and physical realms, and size, in terms of number of users, devices, and services. These characteristics motivate the need for distributed optimization and control solutions that can lay the foundations of smart and secure CPSs. In this respect, game theory is expected to play a critical role towards deploying such intelligent CPSs in which cyber-physical devices, and possibly humans, can make independent and strategic decisions, smartly adapting to their environment. In particular, the presence of humans in the CPS loop motivates the adoption of game-theoretic methods that go beyond classical game theory in which agents are assumed to be objective, fully rational, and uninfluenced by real-world perceptions. Capturing such practical CPS considerations within game-theoretic constructs can be achieved via suitable notions of bounded rationality and behavioral considerations. In this talk, we will investigate the role of behavioral game theory in CPS design while delineating emerging frameworks in that field with a focus on two key CPS domains: (i)- Consumer-centric energy management in the smart grid and (ii)- Cyber-physical systems security. We conclude the talk by discussing other ongoing research activities in our group.

    Biography: Walid Saad received his Ph.D degree from the University of Oslo, Norway, in 2010. Currently, he is an Assistant Professor and the Steven O. Lane Junior Faculty Fellow at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. His research interests include cyber-physical systems, wireless and social networks, game theory, security, and machine learning. Dr. Saad is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award in 2013, the AFOSR summer faculty fellowship in 2014, and the Young Investigator Award from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) in 2015. He was the author/co-author of five conference best paper awards at IEEE WiOpt in 2009, ICIMP in 2010, IEEE WCNC in 2012, IEEE PIMRC in 2015, IEEE SmartGridComm, also in 2015. He is the recipient of the 2015 Fred W. Ellersick Prize from the IEEE Communications Society. Dr. Saad serves as an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, IEEE Transactions on Communications, and IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications.

    Host: Paul Bogdan

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Estela Lopez

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  • Repeating EventDepartment of Astronautical Engineering: Presentation on Lessons from Columbia by Matthew Melis

    Mon, Apr 18, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Melis, NASA Glenn Research Center

    Talk Title: Lessons from Columbia A Decade Later

    Abstract: Matt Melis provides a detailed look into the inner workings of the Space Shuttle and a behind the scenes perspective on the impact analysis and testing done for the Columbia Accident Investigation and NASA's Return to Flight programs. His presentation is full of rich, still and motion picture imagery, and, although technical, is easily understood by all audiences. In addition, highlights from recent Shuttle missions are presented demonstrating how NASA conducted its operations differently and more safely, post Columbia, through better imagery, better analysis, and enhanced best practices.

    Biography: Matt received both a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Engineering Mechanics from Michigan State University and has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center for thirty two years. His primary area of focus is in advanced finite element modeling and analysis methods including nonlinear and dynamic impact loading. Trained in engineering mechanics, he has been recognized for expertise in actively cooled structures, stress analysis, ballistic impact research, and multi physics analysis during his tenure at the Research Center. He has worked on numerous aeronautics and space programs for the agency including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and NASA's Exploration Program. In the four and one half years that followed the Columbia accident, Matt was assigned full time to working the Columbia Accident Investigation and the Shuttle Return to Flight Program as technical lead of the NASA Glenn Ballistic Impact team. Most recent Matt has worked on landing impact testing of various design concepts for the Orion crew module and is currently a program sub-element lead for a cryogenic fluid management program at NASA Glenn.

    In addition to his technical commitments, Matt also devotes significant effort to public outreach and teaching for NASA at all levels of education as well as conferences pertaining to Ballistic Impact Research, The Columbia Accident Investigation, NASA's Return to Flight and the Space Shuttle Program. Organizations he has spoken to include: The National Transportation and Safety Board, The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dartmouth College, The Canadian Royal Astronomical Society, Ontario Science Center, Ivey Business School in Canada, The University of Reykjavik, Iceland, The American Society for Metals, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic, and the London Science Festival.



    Host: Department of Astronautical Engineering, Ad Astra Student Society, VGSA

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

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    Posted By: Norma Perry

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  • Systems Architecting and Engineering Program Distinguished Speaker Series - Space is Still a One Strike and You're Out Business

    Mon, Apr 18, 2016 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. William Ballhaus Jr., President Emeritus of The Aerospace Corporation

    Talk Title: Space is Still a One Strike and You're Out Business

    Series: SAE Distinguished Speaker Series

    Abstract: This presentation covers an historical look at the space and launch business from the 1990s to the present, and how the US appears to experience a historical launch cycle. Dr. Ballhaus will also cover the key attributes of successful program execution based on his career experience in government and industry which includes the topics of controlling risk, cost and schedule estimating, people and teamwork, processes, and accountability.

    Biography: Dr. William F. Ballhaus, Jr. is President Emeritus of the Aerospace Corporation. He served as Aerospace President from 2000 to 2007. Dr. Ballhaus joined Aerospace after an 11-year career with Lockheed Martin where he served as corporate vice president, Engineering & Technology. In that post, he was responsible for monitoring the scientific and engineering expertise for the company and overseeing research and engineering functions throughout the Corporation. Prior to his tenure with Lockheed Martin, Dr. Ballhaus served as president of two Martin Marietta businesses: Aero & Naval Systems and Civil Space & Communications. He also was vice president and program director, Titan IV Centaur, at Martin Marietta Space Launch Systems.

    Prior to joining Martin Marietta, Dr. Ballhaus served as director of the NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. He also acted as associate administrator for Aeronautics and Space Technology at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., and served as president of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

    Dr. Ballhaus has B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering and a Ph.D. degree in Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He has served as a co-chair of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and currently serves on engineering advisory boards at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Maryland, MIT, and Johns Hopkins. Dr. Ballhaus is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.


    Host: Azad Madni

    More Information: Distinguished Speaker _ Ballhaus _ Flyer.pdf

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 217

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Azad Madni

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  • Analytic Reconstructions for MEG and EEG (Lecture III)

    Mon, Apr 18, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:20 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Thanasis Fokas, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge & Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California

    Talk Title: Analytic Reconstructions for MEG and EEG (Lecture III)

    Series: Three Part Lecture Series

    Abstract: Analytical reconstructions as well as appropriate mnumerical implementations for the important imaging techniques of Magneto-encephalography (MEG) and Electro-ecephalography (EEG) will be reviewed. The numerical implementations of MEG and EEG are based on state of the art codes for the numerical evaluation of certain auxiliary functions appearing in the relevant analytical formulae. The effectiveness of reconstructions of the neuronal current using either real EEG or real MEG data will be demonstrated.


    Biography: Thanasis Fokas, Chair of Nonlinear mathematical science at the University of Cambridge and Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering here at USC, will give a series of lectures on Magneto-Electro-Encephalography, which will be introduced by Professor Richard Leahy. The work of Thanasis FOKAS and collaborators has resolved completely the following important question in this area that was open since the fundamental work of Helmohltz: which part of the neuronal current can be computed from the knowledge of either MEG or EEG data?


    *This is the final lecture in this series.

    Host: Prof. Richard Leahy

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - EEB 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia White

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  • USC Stem Cell Seminar: Emmanuelle Passegué, University of California, San Francisco

    Tue, Apr 19, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Emmanuelle Passegué, University of California, San Francisco

    Talk Title: Hematopoietic stem cell function in stress, disease and aging

    Series: Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC Distinguished Speakers Series

    Abstract: Our research focuses on understanding the general defense mechanisms used by hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to protect blood production during the lifetime of an ever-changing organism. This fundamental question is central to tissue maintenance and regeneration, and has implications for every aspect of adult physiology ranging from response to stress, development of diseases and biology of aging. Our laboratory is interested in identifying the mechanisms controlling HSC activity in normal and stress conditions, and in understanding how they are affected during disease development and in physiological aging. Our goal is to identify affected genes and pathways that could be used to develop new therapies to treat human diseases and help combat aging.

    Host: Rong Lu

    More Info: https://calendar.usc.edu/event/speaker_emmanuelle_passegue_university_of_california_san_francisco?utm_campaign=widget&utm_medium=widget&utm_source=USC+Event+Calendar%3A+Beta#.VvGTVnDFl04
    Webcast: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-semina

    Location: Eli & Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Resch. (BCC) - First Floor Conference Room

    WebCast Link: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-seminar

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Cristy Lytal/USC Stem Cell

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  • NTT Faculty Candidate Lecture

    Tue, Apr 19, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: NTT Faculty Candidate, Mississippi State University

    Talk Title: Engineering Management Decisions and Statistics - ISE 500

    Host: ISE Dept

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Angela Reneau

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  • Repeating EventDepartment of Astronautical Engineering: Presentation on Lessons from Columbia by Matthew Melis

    Tue, Apr 19, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Melis, NASA Glenn Research Center

    Talk Title: Lessons from Columbia A Decade Later

    Abstract: Matt Melis provides a detailed look into the inner workings of the Space Shuttle and a behind the scenes perspective on the impact analysis and testing done for the Columbia Accident Investigation and NASA's Return to Flight programs. His presentation is full of rich, still and motion picture imagery, and, although technical, is easily understood by all audiences. In addition, highlights from recent Shuttle missions are presented demonstrating how NASA conducted its operations differently and more safely, post Columbia, through better imagery, better analysis, and enhanced best practices.

    Biography: Matt received both a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Engineering Mechanics from Michigan State University and has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center for thirty two years. His primary area of focus is in advanced finite element modeling and analysis methods including nonlinear and dynamic impact loading. Trained in engineering mechanics, he has been recognized for expertise in actively cooled structures, stress analysis, ballistic impact research, and multi physics analysis during his tenure at the Research Center. He has worked on numerous aeronautics and space programs for the agency including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and NASA's Exploration Program. In the four and one half years that followed the Columbia accident, Matt was assigned full time to working the Columbia Accident Investigation and the Shuttle Return to Flight Program as technical lead of the NASA Glenn Ballistic Impact team. Most recent Matt has worked on landing impact testing of various design concepts for the Orion crew module and is currently a program sub-element lead for a cryogenic fluid management program at NASA Glenn.

    In addition to his technical commitments, Matt also devotes significant effort to public outreach and teaching for NASA at all levels of education as well as conferences pertaining to Ballistic Impact Research, The Columbia Accident Investigation, NASA's Return to Flight and the Space Shuttle Program. Organizations he has spoken to include: The National Transportation and Safety Board, The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dartmouth College, The Canadian Royal Astronomical Society, Ontario Science Center, Ivey Business School in Canada, The University of Reykjavik, Iceland, The American Society for Metals, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic, and the London Science Festival.



    Host: Department of Astronautical Engineering, Ad Astra Student Society, VGSA

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

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    Posted By: Norma Perry

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  • Communications, Networks & Systems (CommNetS) Seminar

    Wed, Apr 20, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Vijay Gupta, University of Notre Dame

    Talk Title: Cyber-Physical-Human Systems: Results and Challenges

    Series: CommNetS

    Abstract: Advances in networking and information technology have permitted us to integrate cyber and physical components to design complex systems in fields as diverse as critical infrastructure control, automotive systems, energy conservation, environmental monitoring, and robotics. As we aim to endow such systems with higher levels of autonomy, we have to consider explicitly their interaction with people at multiple layers and in various roles. It is increasingly clear that one of the next frontiers for autonomous systems is to be able to design such cyber-physical-human systems in a systematic and scalable manner. This will naturally require integration of models, tools, constraints and techniques from the individual disciplines. I will cover some examples from our recent work that illustrate this theme. I will begin with the problem of phantom demand response in smart grid which arises when strategic customers seek to maximize their gain by anticipating the control signals that will be used. Then, I will present our recent work on cyber-physical system security that considers malicious intruders seeking to attack the physical system through hijacking the cyber components. Finally, I will show how extending some classical control tools such as passivity and dissipativity to consider cyber components explicitly can help guarantee properties such as composability that are desirable in complex systems. I will finish with some thoughts on challenges that face us in the design of cyber-physical-human systems.

    Biography: Vijay Gupta is the College of Engineering Collegiate Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, having joined the faculty in January 2008. He received his B. Tech degree at Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, and his M.S. and Ph.D. at California Institute of Technology, all in Electrical Engineering. Prior to joining Notre Dame, he also served as a research associate in the Institute for Systems Research at the University of Maryland, College Park, and as a consultant at the United Technologies Research Center. He received the 2013 Donald P. Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council and a 2009 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award. His research and teaching interests are broadly in the interface of communication, control, distributed computation, and human decision making.

    Host: Prof. Ashutosh Nayyar

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • Repeating EventDepartment of Astronautical Engineering: Presentation on Lessons from Columbia by Matthew Melis

    Wed, Apr 20, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Melis, NASA Glenn Research Center

    Talk Title: Lessons from Columbia A Decade Later

    Abstract: Matt Melis provides a detailed look into the inner workings of the Space Shuttle and a behind the scenes perspective on the impact analysis and testing done for the Columbia Accident Investigation and NASA's Return to Flight programs. His presentation is full of rich, still and motion picture imagery, and, although technical, is easily understood by all audiences. In addition, highlights from recent Shuttle missions are presented demonstrating how NASA conducted its operations differently and more safely, post Columbia, through better imagery, better analysis, and enhanced best practices.

    Biography: Matt received both a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Engineering Mechanics from Michigan State University and has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center for thirty two years. His primary area of focus is in advanced finite element modeling and analysis methods including nonlinear and dynamic impact loading. Trained in engineering mechanics, he has been recognized for expertise in actively cooled structures, stress analysis, ballistic impact research, and multi physics analysis during his tenure at the Research Center. He has worked on numerous aeronautics and space programs for the agency including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and NASA's Exploration Program. In the four and one half years that followed the Columbia accident, Matt was assigned full time to working the Columbia Accident Investigation and the Shuttle Return to Flight Program as technical lead of the NASA Glenn Ballistic Impact team. Most recent Matt has worked on landing impact testing of various design concepts for the Orion crew module and is currently a program sub-element lead for a cryogenic fluid management program at NASA Glenn.

    In addition to his technical commitments, Matt also devotes significant effort to public outreach and teaching for NASA at all levels of education as well as conferences pertaining to Ballistic Impact Research, The Columbia Accident Investigation, NASA's Return to Flight and the Space Shuttle Program. Organizations he has spoken to include: The National Transportation and Safety Board, The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dartmouth College, The Canadian Royal Astronomical Society, Ontario Science Center, Ivey Business School in Canada, The University of Reykjavik, Iceland, The American Society for Metals, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic, and the London Science Festival.



    Host: Department of Astronautical Engineering, Ad Astra Student Society, VGSA

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Norma Perry

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  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Apr 20, 2016 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Derek Dunn-Rankin, Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of California, Irvine

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • Ultrafast & Broadband Photonic Signal Processing

    Thu, Apr 21, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Andrew M. Weiner, Purdue University

    Talk Title: Ultrafast & Broadband Photonic Signal Processing

    Abstract: Lasers capable of generating picosecond and femtosecond pulses of light are now firmly established and widely deployed. Going beyond simple pulse generation, the programmable shaping of ultrafast laser fields into arbitrary waveforms has resulted in substantial impact, both enabling new ultrafast science and contributing to applications in high-speed signal transmission. The lecture begins with an introduction to methods permitting shaping of ultrafast laser fields on time scales too fast for direct electronic control. Recent research areas in the Purdue University Ultrafast Optics and Fiber Communications Laboratory drawing on ultrafast pulse shaping are then reviewed. I first discuss photonically-assisted radio-frequency arbitrary waveform generation with application to spatial and temporal focusing of ultrabroadband wireless signals distorted by antennas or multiply scattering indoor propagation environments. In a second example, I describe recent experiments in which pulse shaping is applied in the regime of quantum optics to manipulate the wave packets of correlated photon pairs. A final example pertains to broadband optical frequency comb fields generated via nonlinear wave mixing in chip-scale microresonators pumped by a single-frequency laser. Line-by-line shaping of such fields permits compression into high repetition rate femtosecond pulse trains and furnishes insight into their coherence.


    Biography: Andrew Weiner is the Scifres Family Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University. In 2008 he was elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering and in 2009 was named a Department of Defense National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow. Weiner has served a three year term as Chair of the National Academy's U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Meeting; at present he serves as Editor-in-chief of Optics Express, an all-electronic, open access journal publishing more than 3000 papers a year emphasizing innovations in all aspects of optics and photonics. After Prof. Weiner earned his Sc.D. in electrical engineering in 1984 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he joined Bellcore, at that time a premier telecommunications industry research organization, first as Member of Technical Staff and later as Manager of Ultrafast Optics and Optical Signal Processing Research. He joined Purdue as Professor in 1992, and has since graduated over 35 Ph.D. students. Prof. Weiner has also spent sabbaticals at the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrashort Pulse Spectroscopy, Berlin, Germany and at JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado.

    Prof. Weiner's research focuses on ultrafast optics, with a focus on processing of extremely high speed lightwave signals and ultrabroadband radio-frequency signals. He is especially well known for his pioneering work on programmable generation of arbitrary ultrashort pulse waveforms, which has found application both in fiber optic networks and in ultrafast optical science laboratories around the world.

    Prof. Weiner is author of a textbook entitled Ultrafast Optics, has published eight book chapters, over 300 journal articles, and over 500 conference papers, and is inventor of 18 U.S. patents. His numerous awards include the Hertz Foundation Doctoral Thesis Prize (1984), the Optical Society of America's Adolph Lomb Medal (1990) and R.W. Wood Prize (2008), the International Commission on Optics Prize (1997), and the IEEE Photonics Society's William Streifer Scientific Achievement Award (1999) and Quantum Electronics Prize (2011). At Purdue he has been recognized with the inaugural Research Excellence Award from the Schools of Engineering (2003), the Provost's Outstanding Graduate Student Mentor Award (2008), the Herbert Newby McCoy Award for outstanding contributions on the natural sciences (2013), and the College of Engineering Mentoring Award (2014).

    Host: Andreas Molisch, molisch@usc.edu, EEB 530, x04670

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 322

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Gerrielyn Ramos

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  • Repeating EventDepartment of Astronautical Engineering: Presentation on Lessons from Columbia by Matthew Melis

    Thu, Apr 21, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Melis, NASA Glenn Research Center

    Talk Title: Lessons from Columbia A Decade Later

    Abstract: Matt Melis provides a detailed look into the inner workings of the Space Shuttle and a behind the scenes perspective on the impact analysis and testing done for the Columbia Accident Investigation and NASA's Return to Flight programs. His presentation is full of rich, still and motion picture imagery, and, although technical, is easily understood by all audiences. In addition, highlights from recent Shuttle missions are presented demonstrating how NASA conducted its operations differently and more safely, post Columbia, through better imagery, better analysis, and enhanced best practices.

    Biography: Matt received both a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Engineering Mechanics from Michigan State University and has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center for thirty two years. His primary area of focus is in advanced finite element modeling and analysis methods including nonlinear and dynamic impact loading. Trained in engineering mechanics, he has been recognized for expertise in actively cooled structures, stress analysis, ballistic impact research, and multi physics analysis during his tenure at the Research Center. He has worked on numerous aeronautics and space programs for the agency including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and NASA's Exploration Program. In the four and one half years that followed the Columbia accident, Matt was assigned full time to working the Columbia Accident Investigation and the Shuttle Return to Flight Program as technical lead of the NASA Glenn Ballistic Impact team. Most recent Matt has worked on landing impact testing of various design concepts for the Orion crew module and is currently a program sub-element lead for a cryogenic fluid management program at NASA Glenn.

    In addition to his technical commitments, Matt also devotes significant effort to public outreach and teaching for NASA at all levels of education as well as conferences pertaining to Ballistic Impact Research, The Columbia Accident Investigation, NASA's Return to Flight and the Space Shuttle Program. Organizations he has spoken to include: The National Transportation and Safety Board, The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dartmouth College, The Canadian Royal Astronomical Society, Ontario Science Center, Ivey Business School in Canada, The University of Reykjavik, Iceland, The American Society for Metals, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic, and the London Science Festival.



    Host: Department of Astronautical Engineering, Ad Astra Student Society, VGSA

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Norma Perry

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  • Department of Biomedical Engineering: Systems Cellular-Molecular Bioengineering Distinguished Speaker Series

    Fri, Apr 22, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dino Di Carlo, PhD, Professor of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)Microfluidic Biotechnology Laboratory Bioengineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

    Talk Title: Physical Phenotyping

    Series: Department of Biomedical Engineering: Systems Cellular-Molecular Bioengineering Distinguished Speaker Series

    Host: Professor Megan McCain, PhD

    More Information: Di_Carlo_flyer.pdf

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Department of Astronautical Engineering: Presentation on Lessons from Columbia by Matthew Melis

    Fri, Apr 22, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Melis, NASA Glenn Research Center

    Talk Title: Lessons from Columbia A Decade Later

    Abstract: Matt Melis provides a detailed look into the inner workings of the Space Shuttle and a behind the scenes perspective on the impact analysis and testing done for the Columbia Accident Investigation and NASA's Return to Flight programs. His presentation is full of rich, still and motion picture imagery, and, although technical, is easily understood by all audiences. In addition, highlights from recent Shuttle missions are presented demonstrating how NASA conducted its operations differently and more safely, post Columbia, through better imagery, better analysis, and enhanced best practices.

    Biography: Matt received both a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Engineering Mechanics from Michigan State University and has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center for thirty two years. His primary area of focus is in advanced finite element modeling and analysis methods including nonlinear and dynamic impact loading. Trained in engineering mechanics, he has been recognized for expertise in actively cooled structures, stress analysis, ballistic impact research, and multi physics analysis during his tenure at the Research Center. He has worked on numerous aeronautics and space programs for the agency including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and NASA's Exploration Program. In the four and one half years that followed the Columbia accident, Matt was assigned full time to working the Columbia Accident Investigation and the Shuttle Return to Flight Program as technical lead of the NASA Glenn Ballistic Impact team. Most recent Matt has worked on landing impact testing of various design concepts for the Orion crew module and is currently a program sub-element lead for a cryogenic fluid management program at NASA Glenn.

    In addition to his technical commitments, Matt also devotes significant effort to public outreach and teaching for NASA at all levels of education as well as conferences pertaining to Ballistic Impact Research, The Columbia Accident Investigation, NASA's Return to Flight and the Space Shuttle Program. Organizations he has spoken to include: The National Transportation and Safety Board, The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dartmouth College, The Canadian Royal Astronomical Society, Ontario Science Center, Ivey Business School in Canada, The University of Reykjavik, Iceland, The American Society for Metals, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic, and the London Science Festival.



    Host: Department of Astronautical Engineering, Ad Astra Student Society, VGSA

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Norma Perry

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  • Repeating EventDepartment of Astronautical Engineering: Presentation on Lessons from Columbia by Matthew Melis

    Fri, Apr 22, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Melis, NASA Glenn Research Center

    Talk Title: Lessons from Columbia A Decade Later

    Abstract: Matt Melis provides a detailed look into the inner workings of the Space Shuttle and a behind the scenes perspective on the impact analysis and testing done for the Columbia Accident Investigation and NASA's Return to Flight programs. His presentation is full of rich, still and motion picture imagery, and, although technical, is easily understood by all audiences. In addition, highlights from recent Shuttle missions are presented demonstrating how NASA conducted its operations differently and more safely, post Columbia, through better imagery, better analysis, and enhanced best practices.

    Biography: Matt received both a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Engineering Mechanics from Michigan State University and has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center for thirty two years. His primary area of focus is in advanced finite element modeling and analysis methods including nonlinear and dynamic impact loading. Trained in engineering mechanics, he has been recognized for expertise in actively cooled structures, stress analysis, ballistic impact research, and multi physics analysis during his tenure at the Research Center. He has worked on numerous aeronautics and space programs for the agency including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and NASA's Exploration Program. In the four and one half years that followed the Columbia accident, Matt was assigned full time to working the Columbia Accident Investigation and the Shuttle Return to Flight Program as technical lead of the NASA Glenn Ballistic Impact team. Most recent Matt has worked on landing impact testing of various design concepts for the Orion crew module and is currently a program sub-element lead for a cryogenic fluid management program at NASA Glenn.

    In addition to his technical commitments, Matt also devotes significant effort to public outreach and teaching for NASA at all levels of education as well as conferences pertaining to Ballistic Impact Research, The Columbia Accident Investigation, NASA's Return to Flight and the Space Shuttle Program. Organizations he has spoken to include: The National Transportation and Safety Board, The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dartmouth College, The Canadian Royal Astronomical Society, Ontario Science Center, Ivey Business School in Canada, The University of Reykjavik, Iceland, The American Society for Metals, Skywalker Sound, Industrial Light and Magic, and the London Science Festival.



    Host: Department of Astronautical Engineering, Ad Astra Student Society, VGSA

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Norma Perry

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. Seminar

    Fri, Apr 22, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Ali Kazemian and Gokce Ozcelik, CE Ph.D. Candidates

    Talk Title: See Attachment

    More Information: CEE Seminar 4-22-16.docx

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • Moderating Factors in Predicting Substance Use: Listening to Therapists and Clients Interact

    Mon, Apr 25, 2016 @ 10:00 AM - 11:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Paul C. Amrhein, Columbia University

    Talk Title: Moderating Factors in Predicting Substance Use: Listening to Therapists and Clients Interact

    Abstract: During psychotherapy, and motivational interviewing (MI), in particular, the counselor and client construct a conversation. Besides treatment-specific mechanisms invoked by the counselor (e.g., exploration of ambivalence), the content of this conversation is the result of well-learned discourse mechanisms entailing language fluency, communication skills, goal-directed motivation and social learning, shared by orparticular to these individuals. Shared discourse mechanisms can enable but disparate mechanisms can inhibit a conversation that reliably leads to improved treatment outcomes. Important in this regard is the extent of mutual speaker entrainment at phonetic, morphological, syntactic, and pragmatic levels. The pragmatic level, specifically, speech acts, will be the focus of my talk, as I discuss how matches and mismatches in counselor and client discourse mechanisms can promote or derail the therapeutic conversation, triggering,e.g., client face management, that can skew the meaning and prognostic value of client talk, as a measure of therapeutic engagement and treatment outcomes. The Technical Hypothesis of MI posits that counselor verbal behavior indirectly influences unhealthy client behavior through increases in the strength or frequency of client change talk. Poorly understood, however, is whether or how counselor and client language indices (measured by MITI, MISC or DARNC coding schemes), as markers for discourse mechanisms, interact to determine the predictive value of client change talk.I will present findings of two recent MI training studies based on Swedish Corrections exit interviews and New York City community treatment sessions for substance abuse to demonstrate how and why change talk does not always lead to behavior change.To better understand how the MI conversation engages mechanisms of change, it is clearly important to understand when it doesnt.

    Biography: Dr. Amrhein has attracted national and international attention for his research on motivational interviewing and the study of commitment language. He earned his PhD in Experimental Psychology and M.A. in Linguistics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research has important implications for understanding and predicting changes in drug use. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Medical Psychology at Columbia University in New York and he holds a tenured faculty position in the Department of Psychology at Montclair State University in New Jersey. Dr. Amrhein also served on the faculty of the University of New Mexico, where he worked closely with Dr. William R. Miller on studies of motivational interviewing.

    Host: Prof. Panayiotis Georgiou

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Tanya Acevedo-Lam/EE-Systems

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Apr 25, 2016 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Bruce Wheeler, PhD, Emeritus Professor (University of Florida), Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

    Talk Title: Perspectives on BME: from Editorial Review of Papers to the Role of Informatics Technologies on the Future

    Abstract:
    TIPS FOR SCIENTIFIC WRITING AND WHAT EDITORS AND REVIEWERS ARE LOOKING FOR
    This is a seminar aimed for students of all ages who wish to improve their writing skills for the purpose of publishing scientific papers. The presentation is a combination of two presentations available at the IEEE EMBS GOLD (Graduates Of the Last Decade) site: http://www.gold.embs.org/resources.html originally given by Michael Neuman and Bruce Wheeler. Dr. Wheeler relates a number of issues that are important to reviewers and editors which, if carefully considered, can greatly increase the odds of acceptance. He also gives a shortened version of the materials presented by Dr. Neuman on the classic structure of a scientific article.

    Perspectives on Health Informatics
    This talk gives and overview of the predominance, both current and future, of the field of biomedical and health informatics in shaping the future of health care delivery. Implicit is the argument that the future is exceptionally bright for biomedical engineers, especially those cross-trained in physiology and molecular biology on the one hand and computational science and engineering on the other. There will be growing application in genomic and molecular bioinformatics, as well as multiscale computational modeling of physiological systems. Still the greatest growth and employment will be in the medical and health informatics that are integral to the delivery of healthcare world wide, in both advanced and advancing nations. IEEE EMBS, like other computationally strong biomedical engineering societies, sees great growth for our members and students and is developing programs to help serve their needs.


    Biography: Dr. Wheeler's research interests lie in the application of electrical engineering methodologies to neuroscience. His work influenced the development of neural spike sorting technologies, demonstrated that microelectrode array recording from brain slices was possible and productive, and has been a leader in the development of lithography to control cells, especially neurons, in culture. This work aims at basic science understanding of the behavior of small populations of neurons, in hopes of creating better insight into the functioning of the brain.

    https://www.bme.ufl.edu/people/wheeler_bruce
    Host: James Weiland

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • EE 598 Cyber-Physical Systems Seminar Series

    Mon, Apr 25, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Joao Hespanha, UC Santa Barbara

    Talk Title: Opportunities and Challenges in Control Systems arising from Ubiquitous Computation and Communication

    Abstract: Advances in VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) design and fabrication have resulted in the availability of low-cost, low-power, small-sized devices that have significant computational power and are able to communicate wirelessly. In addition, advances in MEMS (Micro Electric Mechanical Systems) technology have resulted in wide availability of solid-state sensors and actuators. The net result is ubiquitous sensing, communication, and computation that can be incorporated into small low-power devices.

    In this talk, I will discuss how the above-mentioned technological advances present important opportunities and interesting challenges for control system designers. To this effect, I will discuss how the introduction of digital communication in control loops gives rise to a need for new tools for the design and analysis of feedback control systems. I will also describe recent work demonstrating that feedback control based on on-line optimization is a viable approach to solve a wide range of control problem.

    Biography: João P. Hespanha received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and applied science from Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut in 1998. From 1999 to 2001, he was Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He moved to the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2002, where he currently holds a Professor position with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Prof. Hespanha is the Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a member of the Executive Committee for the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB). Dr. Hespanha is the recipient of the Yale University's Henry Prentiss Becton Graduate Prize for exceptional achievement in research in Engineering and Applied Science, the 2005 Automatica Theory/Methodology best paper prize, the 2006 George S. Axelby Outstanding Paper Award, and the 2009 Ruberti Young Researcher Prize. Dr. Hespanha is a Fellow of the IEEE and an IEEE distinguished lecturer from 2007 to 2013.

    Dr. Hespanha's current research interests include hybrid and switched systems; multi-agent control systems; distributed control over communication networks (also known as networked control systems); the use of vision in feedback control; stochastic modeling in biology; and network security.


    Host: Paul Bogdan

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Estela Lopez

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  • USC Stem Cell Seminar: In-Hyun Park, Yale School of Medicine

    Tue, Apr 26, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: In-Hyun Park, Yale School of Medicine

    Talk Title: Reprogramming and its application in Rhett Syndrome

    Series: Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC Distinguished Speakers Series

    Abstract: Overexpression of four factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, Myc, or Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, Lin28) reprograms somatic cells to become induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Reprogramming accompanies genetic and epigenetic changes. We will investigate the molecular mechanism of somatic cell reprogramming. iPSCs provide an incredible resource for cell-based therapy, in vitro disease model and screening drugs. We apply the iPSCs to investigate one of the most prevalent female mental retardation disorders called Rett syndrome.

    Host: Justin Ichida

    More Info: https://calendar.usc.edu/event/speaker_in-hyun_park_yale_school_of_medicine?utm_campaign=widget&utm_medium=widget&utm_source=USC+Event+Calendar%3A+Beta#.VvGXfXDFl04
    Webcast: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-semina

    Location: Eli & Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Resch. (BCC) - First Floor Conference Room

    WebCast Link: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-seminar

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Cristy Lytal/USC Stem Cell

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  • Viterbi School of Engineering, Engineering Writing Program Panel Discussion

    Tue, Apr 26, 2016 @ 04:30 PM - 06:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Armand Tanguay, George Tolomiczenko, Helga Van Herle, Moderator: David Sawcer, University of Southern California, Viterbi School of Engineering and Keck School of Medicine of USC

    Talk Title: Navigating the Multidisciplinary Research Environment

    Abstract: Please join us April 26 for a Viterbi School of Engineering panel discussion that will highlight lessons learned about the conduct of collaborative research across engineering and fields including medicine, physics, and biology.

    The conversation will focus on research initiation, organizational, and ongoing communication challenges to bridging key gaps in multidisciplinary knowledge, scientific terms and descriptive language, concepts and research approaches.

    How can multidisciplinary researchers use these elements to create optimal partnerships and interactive environments that will move us towards new and productive areas of research?

    What best practices exist to promote knowledge exchange and dissemination at both at the project level and among individual researchers?

    How should we best educate students and postdoctoral fellows to approach problems that draw from different disciplines?

    What institutional resources exist at USC to support multidisciplinary work?

    Biography: Armand Tanguay, Jr., Ph.D.
    Departments of Electrical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, and Biomedical Engineering - Viterbi School of Engineering, Department of Physics and Astronomy - Dornsife College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences, Neuroscience Graduate Program

    George Tolomiczenko, Ph.D.
    Administrative Director, Health, Technology and Engineering (HTE)
    Assistant Professor in Clinical Neurology, Keck School of Medicine of USC

    Helga Van Herle, M.D.
    Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
    Keck School of Medicine of USC

    Moderator: David Sawcer, M.D., Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor of Clinical Dermatology
    Keck School of Medicine of USC


    Host: Engineering Writing Program (EWP)

    More Info: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/navigating-the-multidisciplinary-research-environment-tickets-24601193833

    More Information: EWP Panel Discussion Flier_4-15-16.pdf

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - RTH 211

    Audiences: faculty and grad students

    Posted By: Elizabeth Fife

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  • Ph.D. Academic Career Mentoring Series

    Wed, Apr 27, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Doctoral Programs

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Maja Mataric' and Panel, Vice Dean of Research

    Talk Title: Getting an Academic Job: What Really Matters and How to Do It Right

    Abstract: Academe is changing, and doctoral graduates in engineering are presented with a wider array of career opportunities than ever before. The Spring 2016 Academic Career Mentoring Panel will focus on advising current Ph.D. students and postdocs on landing a job in academia, and what really matters when researching and applying for opportunities.

    USC Viterbi faculty panelists, Dr. Andrea Armani, Dr. Hossein Hashemi, and Dr. Aleksandra Korolova will discuss their experiences, recent changes in the market for faculty talents and advise current Ph.D. and postdocs on their search for an academic career. The panel will be moderated by Dr. Maja Mataric'

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Ph.D. and Postdoctoral

    Posted By: Tracy Charles

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  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Apr 27, 2016 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Marcus Roper, Associate Professor of Mathematics at the University of California, Los Angeles

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • MFD - Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Distinguished Lecture: Kristin Perrson

    Thu, Apr 28, 2016 @ 12:45 PM - 02:00 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Kristin Perrson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Talk Title: The Materials Project: Merging Simulations, Supercomputing, and Data Science for Materials Genomics

    Series: MFD Distinguished Lecture

    Host: Prof. Priya Vashishta

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Jason Ordonez

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  • AI Seminar

    Fri, Apr 29, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Naira Hovakimyan, Professor, University Illinois Urbana Champagne

    Talk Title: Aerial Co-robots of Future: How Far We Are?

    Abstract: The presentation will give a historical overview of flight control technology from its inception till its maturation. Parallel developments in aerial robotics will be reviewed from the perspective of aerospace industry standards, prioritizing safety, resilience and reliability of operations. Special focus will be placed on cooperative control of UAVs for various mission scenarios in military operations. Flight tests of a subscale commercial jet at NASA and Learjet at Edwards Air Force base will be used to demonstrate the efficiency of the methods developed over the past ten years. Lessons learned will be summarized, and the opportunities in public safety, elderly care, package delivery, precision farming and digital agriculture will be discussed.


    Biography: Bio of Naira Hovakimyan
    Naira Hovakimyan graduated with MS degree in Theoretical Mechanics and Applied Mathematics in 1988 from Yerevan State University in Armenia. She got her Ph.D. in Physics and Mathematics in 1992, in Moscow, from the Institute of Applied Mathematics of Russian Academy of Sciences, majoring in optimal control and differential games. Before joining the faculty of UIUC in 2008, she has spent time as a research scientist at Stuttgart University in Germany, at INRIA in France, at Georgia Institute of Technology, and she was on faculty of Aerospace and Ocean engineering of Virginia Tech during 2003-2008. She is currently W. Grafton and Lillian B. Wilkins Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering at UIUC. In 2015 she was named as inaugural director for Intelligent Robotics Lab of CSL at UIUC. She has co-authored a book and more than 300 refereed publications. She is the recipient of the SICE International scholarship for the best paper of a young investigator in the VII ISDG Symposium (Japan, 1996), the 2011 recipient of AIAA Mechanics and Control of Flight award and the 2015 recipient of SWE Achievement Award. In 2014 she was awarded the Humboldt prize for her lifetime achievements and was recognized as Hans Fischer senior fellow of Technical University of Munich. In 2015 she was recognized by UIUC Engineering Council award for Excellence in Advising. She is an associate fellow and life member of AIAA, a Senior Member of IEEE, and a member of SIAM, AMS, SWE, ASME and ISDG. Naira is co-founder of IntelinAir, Inc., a company that commercializes data-drones for delivering actionable information from aerial imagery for various industries. Her work in robotics for elderly care was featured in the New York Times. Her research interests are in the theory of robust adaptive control and estimation, control in the presence of limited information, networks of autonomous systems, game theory and applications of those in safety-critical systems of aerospace, mechanical, electrical, petroleum and biomedical engineering.


    Host: Aram Galstyan

    More Info: TBA

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th floor large conference room

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Kary LAU

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  • AI Seminar

    Fri, Apr 29, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Naira Hovakimyan, Professor, University Illinois Urbana Champagne

    Talk Title: Aerial Co-robots of Future: How Far We Are?

    Abstract: The presentation will give a historical overview of flight control technology from its inception till its maturation. Parallel developments in aerial robotics will be reviewed from the perspective of aerospace industry standards, prioritizing safety, resilience and reliability of operations. Special focus will be placed on cooperative control of UAVs for various mission scenarios in military operations. Flight tests of a subscale commercial jet at NASA and Learjet at Edwards Air Force base will be used to demonstrate the efficiency of the methods developed over the past ten years. Lessons learned will be summarized, and the opportunities in public safety, elderly care, package delivery, precision farming and digital agriculture will be discussed.


    Biography: Bio of Naira Hovakimyan
    Naira Hovakimyan graduated with MS degree in Theoretical Mechanics and Applied Mathematics in 1988 from Yerevan State University in Armenia. She got her Ph.D. in Physics and Mathematics in 1992, in Moscow, from the Institute of Applied Mathematics of Russian Academy of Sciences, majoring in optimal control and differential games. Before joining the faculty of UIUC in 2008, she has spent time as a research scientist at Stuttgart University in Germany, at INRIA in France, at Georgia Institute of Technology, and she was on faculty of Aerospace and Ocean engineering of Virginia Tech during 2003-2008. She is currently W. Grafton and Lillian B. Wilkins Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering at UIUC. In 2015 she was named as inaugural director for Intelligent Robotics Lab of CSL at UIUC. She has co-authored a book and more than 300 refereed publications. She is the recipient of the SICE International scholarship for the best paper of a young investigator in the VII ISDG Symposium (Japan, 1996), the 2011 recipient of AIAA Mechanics and Control of Flight award and the 2015 recipient of SWE Achievement Award. In 2014 she was awarded the Humboldt prize for her lifetime achievements and was recognized as Hans Fischer senior fellow of Technical University of Munich. In 2015 she was recognized by UIUC Engineering Council award for Excellence in Advising. She is an associate fellow and life member of AIAA, a Senior Member of IEEE, and a member of SIAM, AMS, SWE, ASME and ISDG. Naira is co-founder of IntelinAir, Inc., a company that commercializes data-drones for delivering actionable information from aerial imagery for various industries. Her work in robotics for elderly care was featured in the New York Times. Her research interests are in the theory of robust adaptive control and estimation, control in the presence of limited information, networks of autonomous systems, game theory and applications of those in safety-critical systems of aerospace, mechanical, electrical, petroleum and biomedical engineering.


    Host: Aram Galstyan

    More Info: TBA

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th floor large conference room

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Kary LAU

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  • NTT Faculty Candidate Lecture

    Fri, Apr 29, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: NTT Faculty Candidate, University of Texas

    Talk Title: "Designing a production system for packaged food".

    Host: ISE Dept

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Angela Reneau

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  • NL Seminar-Deep learning solutions to computational phenotyping in health care

    Fri, Apr 29, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Zhengping Che, USC

    Talk Title: Deep learning solutions to computational phenotyping in health care

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: Exponential growth in electronic health care data has resulted in new opportunities and urgent needs to discover meaningful data-driven representations and patterns of diseases. Recent rise of this research field with more available data and new applications also has introduced several challenges. In this talk, we will present our deep learning solutions to address some of the challenges. First, health care data is inherently heterogeneous, with a variety of missing values and from multiple data sources. We propose variations of Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) to explore and utilize the informative missingness in health care data, and hierarchical multimodal deep models to utilize the relations between different data sources. Second, model interpretability is not only important but necessary for care providers and clinical experts. We introduce a simple yet effective knowledge distillation approach called interpretable mimic learning to learn interpretable gradient boosting tree models while mimicking the performance of deep learning models.




    Biography: Zhengping Che is a third year PhD candidate in the Computer Science Department at the University of Southern California, advised by Professor Yan Liu. Before that, he received his bachelor degree in Computer Science from Pilot CS Class (Yao Class) at Tsinghua University, China. His primary research interest lies in the area of deep learning and its applications in health care domain, especially on multivariate time series data.

    Host: Xing Shi and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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