Logo: University of Southern California

Events Calendar



Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars
Events for February

  • Online Dynamic Robust PCA

    Mon, Feb 01, 2016 @ 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Namrata Vaswani, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University

    Talk Title: Online Dynamic Robust PCA

    Abstract: We introduce a novel and provably correct solution approach, called ReProCS, to the online dynamic robust principal components' analysis (PCA) problem. Robust PCA (RPCA) can be understood as a problem of separating a low-rank matrix of the true data, L, and a sparse matrix of outliers, S, from their sum, Y = L + S. Application domains include computer vision and data analytics, among others. For example, the problem of separating sparse foregrounds (e.g., moving objects) from slowly changing backgrounds in video sequences can be posed as an instance of RPCA. This is a key first step in simplifying many computer vision tasks, e.g., video surveillance, low-bandwidth mobile video chats and video conferencing, low-light imaging ("seeing moving objects in the dark") and video denoising. RPCA solutions are also very useful in solving product recommender systems' design problems, such as the Netflix problem, when the user data may contain outliers (e.g., due to lazy or malicious users). While there has been a large amount of recent work on provably correct batch RPCA solutions, the online and dynamic RPCA problem is largely open. Online dynamic RPCA is the problem of solving RPCA on-the-fly, with the extra assumptions that the initial subspace is accurately known and that the subspace from which the true data is generated is either fixed or changes slowly over time. For most of the applications discussed above, an online solution is clearly preferable and it can be argued that these extra assumptions hold. We demonstrate the power of our proposed ReProCS based online dynamic RPCA solution for many of the above applications. Moreover, under mild assumptions, we show that, with high probability, ReProCS recovers the support of the outliers exactly at all times; the subspace in which the true data lies is tracked accurately; and the error in the estimates of both is small at all times.



    Host: Professor Mahdi Soltanolkotabi

    Location: 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia Veal

    OutlookiCal
  • Communications, Networks & Systems (CommNetS) Seminar

    Mon, Feb 01, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Achilleas Anastasopoulos, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    Talk Title: A systematic process for evaluating structured equilibria in dynamic games with asymmetric information

    Series: CommNetS

    Abstract: We consider problems involving multiple agents making decisions dynamically in the presence of asymmetric information.
    When agents have a common objective (dynamic decentralized teams) recent results have established a systematic framework for obtaining the optimal decision strategy that is akin to the well-known backward induction in partially observed Markov decision processes (POMDPs).
    However, when agents are strategic (dynamic games with asymmetric information) there is no known systematic process for evaluating the appropriate equilibria in a sufficiently general setting. The well-known backward induction process for finding sub-game perfect equilibria is useless in these problems and we are stuck with an indecomposable fixed-point equation in the space of strategies and beliefs.
    In this talk we will discuss a class of perfect Bayesian equilibria (PBE) that are the counterparts of Markov perfect equilibria (MPE) for asymmetric information games. The corresponding "state" is a belief based on the common information among agents.
    We will then propose a two-step backward-forward inductive algorithm to find these structured PBE. The backward inductive part of this algorithm defines an equilibrium generating function. Each period in the backward induction involves solving a "small" fixed point equation. Using this generating function, equilibrium strategies and beliefs are defined through a forward recursion.

    Biography: Achilleas Anastasopoulos received the Diploma in EE from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece in 1993, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in EE from the University of Southern California in 1994 and 1999, respectively. He is currently an Associate Professor of EECS at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His research interests lie in 1) the general area of communication and information theory, with emphasis in channel coding and multi-user channels; 2) control theory with emphasis in decentralized stochastic control and its connections to communications and information-theoretic problems; 3) analysis of dynamic games and mechanism design for resource allocation in networked systems.

    Host: Dr. Ashutosh Nayyar

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

    OutlookiCal
  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Feb 01, 2016 @ 12:30 PM - 01:49 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dion Kai Dickman, PhD, Assistant Professor in Neurobiology, USC Dornsife

    Talk Title: Homeostatic control of sleep and synaptic plasticity

    Abstract: Homeostatic Control of Sleep and Synaptic Plasticity

    Summary
    Synapses have the remarkable ability to adaptively modulate synaptic strength in response to perturbations that would otherwise destabilize neurotransmission, referred to as homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Homeostatic signaling systems have emerged as robust and potent regulators of neural activity, enabling stable synaptic function while permitting the flexibility necessary for learning and memory, yet the molecules and mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We have pioneered forward genetic approaches in Drosophila to identify genes required for homeostatic synaptic plasticity. We will first discuss an enigmatic protein complex that has emerged from this screen, which is associated with schizophrenia, and the role of this complex in synaptic function and homeostatic plasticity. We will then present data about how an individual synapse adapts to conflicting homeostatic perturbations to stable synaptic function. Finally, we are developing new tools, including translational profiling and light sheet microscopy, to reveal homeostatic adaptations to synaptic function, which may be linked to sleep, and ancient, essential, and fundamental homeostatic signaling system shared by all animal life.




    Biography: Bio
    Dion Dickman was born in Hawaii and did his undergraduate work at Washington University in St. Louis, studying synaptogenesis at the mouse neuromuscular junction in the lab of Joshua Sanes. He went to Harvard for graduate work and UCSF for his postdoctoral studies, performing electrophysiology-based, forward genetic screens in Drosophila, identifying new genes involved in synaptic development, function, and plasticity. He has recently started his own laboratory at the University of Southern California, where his group investigates how synaptic transmission is kept within stable physiological ranges in the nervous system, while still permitting the flexibility necessary for learning and memory. Using Drosophila as our model system, we are interested in the genes and molecular mechanisms that achieve and maintain the homeostatic control of synaptic strength, and how dysfunction in this process may contribute to neuropsychiatric disease. We are using a combination of genetic, electrophysiological, imaging, and behavioral approaches to gain insight into this complex and fundamental form of neural plasticity.

    http://dornsife.usc.edu/labs/dickmanlab
    Host: K. Kirk Shung, PhD

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

    OutlookiCal
  • Faculty Candidate Seminar

    Mon, Feb 01, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Private, Private

    Talk Title: Modeling Disease for Effective Control - Tuberculosis in India

    Host: Epstein Department of ISE

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Michele ISE

    OutlookiCal
  • USC Stem Cell Seminar: Joanna Wysocka, Stanford University

    Tue, Feb 02, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Joanna Wysocka, Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, and Development Biology/Stanford Univeristy

    Talk Title: On peculiarities of being a human: Transcriptional regulation in human development and evolution

    Series: Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC Distinguished Speakers Series

    Abstract: While studies in model organisms have led to great progress in unveiling the conserved mechanisms of gene regulation, many aspects of development that are unique to humans and other primates remain unexplored, as are regulatory principles underlying emergence of human-specific traits. I will discuss some of our recent progress in understanding transcriptional mechanisms governing human development and evolution, such as those involving the activity of transposable elements in early embryogenesis or our recent quantitative analyses of cis-regulatory divergence in the human and chimpanzee neural crest, an embryonic cell population that is most relevant for evolution of human craniofacial form.

    Host: Gage Crump

    More Info: http://stemcell.usc.edu/events/details/?event_id=916788
    Webcast: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-semina

    Location: Eli & Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Resch. (BCC) - First floor seminar room

    WebCast Link: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-seminar

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Cristy Lytal/USC Stem Cell

    OutlookiCal
  • How Do Large Networks of Neurons Make Decisions?

    Tue, Feb 02, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Bijan Pesaran, New York University

    Talk Title: How Do Large Networks of Neurons Make Decisions?

    Abstract: Abstract: Selecting and planning actions recruits neurons across many areas of the brain but how ensembles of neurons work together to make decisions is unknown. Temporally-coherentneural activity may provide a mechanism by which neurons coordinate their activity in order to make decisions. If so, neurons that are part of coherent ensembles may predict movement choices before other ensembles of neurons. We have been studying activity within the posterior parietal cortex while monkeys make choices about where to look and reach, by decoding the activity to predict the choices. We find that ensembles of neurons that display coherent patterns of spiking activity extending across the parietal cortex, ''dual coherent'' ensembles, predict movement choices substantially earlier than other neuronal ensembles. We propose that dual-coherent spike timing reflects interactions between groups of neurons that play an important role in how we make decisions. I will discuss this result in the context of models of larger scale brain circuits that make decisions. I will finish by presenting our latest efforts to develop new technologies and perform brain-scale investigations of the primate brain.

    Biography: Bijan Pesaran is Associate Professor of Neural Science at the Center for Neural Science at New York University. He is also member of NYUs Center for Neuroeconomics. Pesaran is an expert in neuronal dynamics and decision making and has pioneered the study of spike-field coherence in the non-human primate brain. His lab has developed large-scale neurophysiological circuit mapping capabilities to understand how behavior emerges from neuronal activity across interacting brain circuits. He has developed transformative multimodal technology to simultaneously record from single neurons, local potentials and micro-ECoG signals across the cortical layers directly below ECoG recording sites.

    Host: Maryam Shanechi

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Gloria Halfacre

    OutlookiCal
  • Albert Dorman Lecture Series

    Tue, Feb 02, 2016 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Lt. General Hank Hatch, Senior Advisor to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    Talk Title: "Engineering a Sustainable Future"

    Host: Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    More Information: ADLS Hank Hatch.pdf

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 526

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Kaela Berry

    OutlookiCal
  • Epstein Institute Seminar - ISE 651

    Tue, Feb 02, 2016 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Chaithanya Bandi, Kellogg School of Management

    Talk Title: Resource Allocation under Ambiguous Risk Preferences

    Host: Phebe Vayanos & Paat Rusmevichientong (Marshall)

    More Information: February 2, 2016.pdf

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Michele ISE

    OutlookiCal
  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Feb 03, 2016 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Bala Ambati, Professor & Director of Corneal Research at the Moran Eye Center University of Utahrneal Research Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah

    Talk Title: Rays vs. Shadows: Fighting Global Blindness through Ophthalmic Genetics & Bioengineering

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Abstract: Over 30 million people are blind in both eyes, with another 200 million patients with significant loss of vision in one or both eyes. This is an unnecessary tragedy - 80% of this vision loss is preventable or treatable. Dr. Ambati share his journey in vision research and global health by showing how ocular biology and drug delivery can be married and employed to combat the principal challenges of our time in the world of vision - cataract, corneal scarring, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. He will his discuss his laboratory's innovations in drop-free cataract surgery, targeted intraceptor nanoparticles for macular degeneration and corneal transplant rejection, and neurovascular restoration in the diabetic retina. He will also lay out the landscape and opportunities in eye research and global blindness.

    Biography: Bala Ambati is a cornea specialist with a research focus in angiogenesis. Dr. Ambati's team is presently focused on the role of sFlt-1 in maintaining ocular vascular demarcations, work which was awarded the 2012 ARVO/Genentech Award for Research in Macular Degeneration, the 2013 Troutman-Veronneau Prize & the 2014 Ludwig von Sallmann Clinician-Scientist Award. Clinically, Dr. Ambati was the first to describe use of bevacizumab (Avastin) to treat corneal transplant rejection. He has developed key surgical innovations and is developing transformational ocular drug delivery implants which will serve as a versatile platform for treating macular degeneration, glaucoma, and other diseases by sustained release of multiple drugs from within the lens capsule. Dr. Ambati has been recognized for his teaching excellence by a University of Utah Resident Research Mentor Award, the Gold Humanism Award, and by serving as an Instructor at the Harvard Cataract Course for 2009 and 2010.

    Host: Dr. Anita Penkova

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

    OutlookiCal
  • Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Building Unreliable Microstructures 20 Microns at a Time

    Thu, Feb 04, 2016 @ 12:45 PM - 02:00 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Professor Lyle Levine, National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Talk Title: Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Building Unreliable Microstructures 20 Microns at a Time

    Series: Graduate Seminar

    Abstract: Additive manufacturing of metals could revolutionize the design and production of complex, high value metal parts. However, the extreme processing conditions of, essentially, welding millions of microscopic bits of metal together, create deleterious microstructures with high stresses, extreme compositional gradients, non-equilibrium phases, and a variety of potentially disastrous build flaws. How can the processing and post processing treatments be optimized to produce useable and consistent microstructures and mechanical properties? We are developing a comprehensive methodology to answer three questions: what is there?, why is it there?, and how can
    we fix what is there? To optimize the build and post build processing steps, we are developing and using a combination of multicomponent computational thermodynamic and kinetic microstructural evolution simulations, finite element models, and worldleading stress and microstructure characterization methods using synchrotron X-rays, neutrons, and lab based measurements. I will describe our progress in our first target
    systems, Ni-based super alloys and steels.

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Martin Olekszyk

    OutlookiCal
  • Faculty Candidate Seminar

    Thu, Feb 04, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Private, Private

    Talk Title: Control of Contagin Processes on Networks

    Host: Epstein Department of ISE

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Michele ISE

    OutlookiCal
  • An Information Theoretic Perspective of Cloud Radio Access Networks

    Fri, Feb 05, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Shlomo Shamai, Technion Israel Institute of Technology

    Talk Title: An Information Theoretic Perspective of Cloud Radio Access Networks

    Abstract: On Cloud Radio Access Networks: Information Theoretic Considerations Cloud radio access networks (C-RANs) emerge as appealing architectures for next-generation wireless/cellular systems whereby the processing/decoding is migrated from the local base-stations/radio units (RU) to a control/central units (CU) in the "cloud". This is facilitated by fronthaul links connecting the RUs to the managing CUs. We focus on oblivious processing at the RU, and hence the fronthaul links carry digital information about the baseband signals, in the uplink from the RUs to the CU and vice versa in the downlink. The high data rate service demands in C-RANs, imply that even with fast (optical) fronthauls, let alone for heterogeneous fronhauls, efficient compression of the basedand signals is essential. In this talk we focus on advanced robust signal processing solutions, emerging by network information theoretic concept and review also the basic approaches to this cloud network. Multi-hop fronthaul topologies are also discussed. Analysis and numerical results illustrate the considerable performance gains to be expected for different cellular models. Some interesting theoretical directions conclude the presentation.

    Joint work with S.-H. Park (Chonbuk National University), O. Simeone (NJIT), and O. Sahin (InterDigital)

    Biography: Shlomo Shamai (Shitz) received the B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Technion---Israel Institute of Technology, in 1975, 1981 and 1986 respectively.

    During 1975-1985 he was with the Communications Research Labs, in the capacity of a Senior Research Engineer. Since 1986 he is with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion---Israel Institute of Technology, where he is now a Technion Distinguished Professor, and holds the William Fondiller Chair of Telecommunications. His research interests encompasses a wide spectrum of topics in information theory and statistical communications.

    Dr. Shamai (Shitz) is an IEEE Fellow, a member of the Israeli Academy of Sciences and Humanities and a foreign member of the US National Academy of Engineering. He is the recipient of the 2011 Claude E. Shannon Award and the 2014 Rothschild Prize in Mathematics/Computer Sciences and Engineering.

    He has been awarded the 1999 van der Pol Gold Medal of the Union Radio Scientifique Internationale (URSI), and is a co-recipient of the 2000 IEEE Donald G. Fink Prize Paper Award, the 2003, and the 2004 joint IT/COM societies paper award, the 2007 IEEE Information Theory Society Paper Award, the 2009 and 2015 European Commission FP7, Network of Excellence in Wireless COMmunications (NEWCOM++, NEWCOM#) Best Paper Awards, the 2010 Thomson Reuters Award for International Excellence in Scientific Research, the 2014 EURASIP Best Paper Award (for the EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking), and the 2015 IEEE Communications Society Best Tutorial Paper Award. He is also the recipient of 1985 Alon Grant for distinguished young scientists and the 2000 Technion Henry Taub Prize for Excellence in Research. He has served as Associate Editor for the Shannon Theory of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, and has also served twice on the Board of Governors of the Information Theory Society. He has served on the Executive Editorial Board of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory

    Host: Guiseppe Caire, caire@usc.edu

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 539

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Gerrielyn Ramos

    OutlookiCal
  • EE-EP Faculty Candidate - Owen Miller, Friday, February 5th at 2:00pm in EEB 132

    Fri, Feb 05, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Owen Miller, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Talk Title: Design at the Nanoscale: Reaching the Limits of Wave-Matter Interactions

    Abstract: Nanoscale devices are emerging for an increasing variety of technological applications. Photonics will play a critical role, and within three areas - photovoltaics, nanoparticle scattering, and radiative heat transfer - I will show how large-scale computational optimization and rigorous analytical frameworks enable rapid search through large design spaces, and spur discovery of fundamental limits to interactions between light and matter.

    In photovoltaics, the famous ray-optical 4n^2 limit to absorption enhancement has for decades served as a critical design goal, and it motivated the use of quasi-random textures in commercial solar cells. I will show that at subwavelength scales, non-intuitive, computationally designed textures outperform random ones, and can closely approach the 4n^2 limit. Pivoting to metallic structures, where there has not been an analogous "4n^2" limit, I will show how energy-conservation principles lead to fundamental limits to the optical response of metals, answering a long-standing question about the tradeoff between resonant enhancement and material loss. The limits were stimulated by a computational discovery in nanoparticle optimization, where I will present theoretical designs and experimental measurements (by a collaborator) approaching the upper bounds of absorption and scattering. The energy-conservation principles can be extended to the emerging field of radiative heat transfer, where they generalize the ray-optical concept of a "blackbody" to the nanoscale.

    Biography: Dr. Owen Miller is a postdoctoral research associate in MIT Applied Math, working with Steven Johnson. He received his PhD in 2012 from UC Berkeley, where he was advised by Eli Yablonovitch and selected as an NSF Graduate Fellow. He received bachelor's degrees in EE and physics from the Univ. of Virginia in 2007. His research interests center around leveraging large-scale computational optimization and theoretical analysis for nanoscale devices, especially for emerging energy applications.

    Host: EE-EP

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

    OutlookiCal
  • NL Seminar-Deciphering Dark Web through k-partite Graph Summarization

    Fri, Feb 05, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Linhong Zhu, USC/ISI

    Talk Title: Deciphering Dark Web through k-partite Graph Summarization

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: Facts and their relations extracted from web are commonly modeled as graphs with different types of vertices. In this work, we focus on the problem of revealing latent entities from a $k$-partite graph, by co-clustering $k$ types of different vertices. We propose a CoSum approach, which creates a summary graph, where each super node (a cluster of original vertices) represents a hidden entity and the weighted edges encode important relations among extracted entities. The resulted summary graph also allows for investigation and interpretation of hidden entities. Evaluation verifies that CoSum outperforms several baselines in terms of entity coherence, query supporting and recovering hidden victims in the applied human trafficking domain.



    Biography: Linhong Zhu is currently a computer scientist at Information Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, where she also received training as a Postdoctoral Research Associate. Before that, she worked as a Scientist-I in data analytics department at Institute for Infocomm Research, Singapore. She obtained her Ph.D. degree in computer engineering from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore in 2011. Her research interests are large-scale graph analytics with applications to social network analysis, social media analysis, and predictive modeling. She has been awarded with University of Southern California Postdoctoral travel and training award in 2014 and her paper has been selected as two of the best papers in SIGMOD 2010.

    Host: Xing Shi and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 6th Flr Conf Rm # 689, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Heng Yin (Syracuse University) - A Semantics-Centric Approach to Fight Android Malware

    Mon, Feb 08, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Heng Yin, Syracuse University

    Talk Title: A Semantics-Centric Approach to Fight Android Malware

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    The number of new Android malware instances has grown exponentially in recent years. McAfee reports that 2.47 million new mobile malware samples were collected in 2013, which represents a 197% increase over 2012. Greater and greater amounts of manual effort are required to analyze the increasing number of new malware instances. This has led to a strong interest in developing methods to automate the malware analysis process. In this talk, I will present a series of semantics-centric techniques to fight Android malware. First of all, we need a powerful analysis framework to quickly understand the inner-working of a given malware sample. To this end, we developed a virtualization-based analysis framework called DroidScope, which can seamlessly reconstruct both OS and Java level semantic views to provide a holistic view of a malware attack. Moreover, we need to automatically classify malware samples by their functionalities and behaviors and discover zero-day malware. We proposed a new semantics-based technique for malware classification, by capturing the semantics-level behavior of an app in form of ``Weighted Contextual API Dependency Graphs". Then by computing the similarity between these graphs, we can accurately and reliably detect malware variants and zero-day malware. Furthermore, we believe that malware detection can be more effective by getting end users into the loop. In particular, we developed a new technique that can automatically generate human-readable descriptions of a given app, such that any unexpected descriptions will cause suspicions and flagged by end users. To encourage wide adoption and follow-up research, these research products are available in form of source code release and/or web services.

    Biography: Heng Yin is an Associate Professor in the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Syracuse University. His research interests mainly lie in computer security. In particular, he is interested in applying program analysis techniques and virtualization techniques to improve software and system security and defeat malware attacks. He earned his PhD degree in Computer Science from the College of William and Mary in July 2009. He was a main contributor in BitBlaze team at UC Berkeley before joining Syracuse University. In 2011, he received NSF Career award.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Feb 08, 2016 @ 12:30 PM - 01:49 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Jin Ho Chang, PhD, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Sogang University, Korea

    Talk Title: Hybrid ultrasound imaging and therapeutic techniques for clinical applications,

    Host: K. Kirk Shung, PhD

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

    OutlookiCal
  • Faculty Candidate Seminar

    Mon, Feb 08, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Private, Private

    Talk Title: Structure-Enhancing Algorithms for Statistical Learning Problems

    Host: Epstein Department of ISE

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Michele ISE

    OutlookiCal
  • EE-EP Seminar - Peng Zhang, Monday, February 8th at 2:00pm in EEB 132

    Mon, Feb 08, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Peng Zhang, University of Michigan

    Talk Title: Ultrafast and Nanoscale Interfacial Charge Transport and It's Interaction with Electomagnetic Waves

    Abstract: Interfacial charge and energy transport is of fundamental importance to nanoscience and devices. It is critical to the development of quantum plasmonic junctions, ultrafast photoelectron sources, and compact electromagnetic radiation sources (millimeter wave to THz to x-ray), which have applications in imaging, communication, energy, and security. The rapid development in nanotechnology and ultrafast laser optics has opened up great opportunities to control interfacial transport at ultrashort spatiotemporal scales and offers unprecedented scientific advances. However, the understanding of the underlying physics is limited and scaling laws are largely unexplored.
    In this talk, I will present recent advances on the modeling of electron transport at contact interfaces and ultrafast electron emission from metal surfaces. Scaling laws for electrical contact resistance between dissimilar materials are constructed for a large range of material properties and geometrical aspect ratios. Spreading resistance and current crowding effects are quantified from the exact solutions constructed. Validated against numerical codes, they are recently applied to electrically pumped nanolasers. A general theory is developed for the quantum tunneling current in a nanoscale metal-insulator-metal junction, covering the direct tunneling, field emission, and space-charge-limited regimes. I will also show our recent theory for laser-induced electron emission, by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation exactly, for arbitrary combination of dc bias and laser intensity. Other modeling efforts on geometric diodes, electromagnetic power absorption, and THz Smith-Purcell radiation will be highlighted. Future research prospects on these topics will be discussed.

    Biography: Peng Zhang is an Assistant Research Scientist in the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences at the University of Michigan (UM) at Ann Arbor, where he received his Ph.D. degree in 2012. He was a recipient of the UM Richard and Eleanor Towner Prize for Outstanding Ph.D. Research, the UM Rackham Presidential Fellowship Award, and the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Graduate Scholarship Award. He has authored journal publications on electrical contacts, classical, ballistic, and quantum diodes, electron emission, electromagnetic heating phenomenology on rough surfaces, surface flashover and discharge, high power microwave sources, pulsed power systems, z-pinches, quantum electrodynamic laser-plasma interaction, and Smith-Purcell radiation. His current research interests mainly focus on theoretical and computational nanoscience and devices, including quantum plasmonic junctions, ultrafast photoemission, and novel compact electromagnetic radiation sources.

    Host: EE-EP

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

    OutlookiCal
  • USC Stem Cell Seminar: Raymond Stevens, USC

    Tue, Feb 09, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Raymond Stevens, Provost Professor of Biological Sciences and Chemistry and Director of The Bridge@USC

    Talk Title: Structure and drug discovery of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily

    Series: Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC Distinguished Speakers Series

    Abstract: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute one of the largest protein families in the human genome and play essential roles in normal cell signaling processes. We have determined structures of more than 20 different GPCRs and made progress in understanding their structure and function. The use of the technology platform for drug discovery is now being established through an industry-academia open source GPCR Consortium, and the companies Receptos and RuiYi.

    Host: Andy McMahon

    More Info: http://stemcell.usc.edu/events/details/?event_id=916789
    Webcast: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-semina

    Location: Eli & Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Resch. (BCC) - First floor seminar room

    WebCast Link: http://keckmedia.usc.edu/stem-cell-seminar

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Cristy Lytal/USC Stem Cell

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Joseph Bonneau (Stanford) - Cryptographic transparency

    Tue, Feb 09, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Joseph Bonneau, Stanford

    Talk Title: Cryptographic transparency

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Traditionally, cryptography aims to eliminate trusted authorities and reduce security to computational assumptions: the system is secure as long as attackers can't guess a random key or solve a hard mathematical problem. This talk will discuss an alternate approach: retain centralized authorities but use cryptography to provide transparency that they are behaving correctly. I'll present two examples: ensuring a public key server is serving keys consistently and ensuring a Bitcoin exchange controls enough funds to be solvent. Reasoning about the security of these systems require a more holistic approach, modeling user actions and economic incentives.

    Biography: Joseph Bonneau is a Postdoctoral Researcher at Stanford University and a Technology Fellow at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. His research focuses on cryptography and security protocols, particularly how they interact with human and organizational behavior and economic incentives. Recently he has focused on Bitcoin and related cryptocurrencies and secure messaging tools. He is also known for his work on passwords and web authentication. He received a PhD from the University of Cambridge under the supervision of Ross Anderson and an BS/MS from Stanford under the supervision of Dan Boneh. Last year he was as a Postdoctoral Fellow at CITP, Princeton and he has previously worked at Google, Yahoo, and Cryptography Research Inc.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • Communications, Networks & Systems (CommNetS) Seminar

    Wed, Feb 10, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Reinhard Heckel, UC Berkeley

    Talk Title: Super-resolution radar

    Series: CommNetS

    Abstract: In this talk, we study the identification of a time-varying linear system whose response is a weighted superposition of time and frequency shifted versions of the input signal. This problem arises in a multitude of applications such as wireless communications and radar imaging. Due to practical constraints, the input signal has finite bandwidth B, and the received signal is observed over a finite time interval of length T only. This gives rise to a time and frequency resolution of 1/B and 1/T. We show that this resolution limit can be overcome, i.e., we can recover the exact (continuous) time-frequency shifts and the corresponding attenuation factors, by solving a convex optimization problem. This result holds provided that the distance between the time-frequency shifts is at least 2.37/B and 2.37/T, in time and frequency. Furthermore, this result allows the total number of time-frequency shifts to be linear (up to a log-factor) in BT, the dimensionality of the response of the system. More generally, we show that we can estimate the time-frequency components of a signal that is S-sparse in the continuous dictionary of time-frequency shifts of a random (window) function, from a number of measurements, that is linear (up to a log-factor) in S. We also discuss extensions of this theory to the localization of targets in MIMO radar.

    Biography: Reinhard Heckel is a Postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Before that, he spent a year in the Cognitive Computing & Computational Sciences Department at IBM Research, Zurich. He completed his Ph.D. in August 2014 at ETH Zurich, Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, advised by Helmut Bölcskei. In Fall 2013, he was a visiting Ph.D. student in the Statistics Department of Stanford University. Reinhard Heckel is interested in various topics in machine learning, mathematical signal processing, sparse signal recovery, and computational biology.

    Host: Mahdi Soltanolkotabi

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: George Varghese (Microsoft Research) -From EDA to NDA: Treating Networks like Hardware Circuits

    Thu, Feb 11, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: George Varghese, Microsoft Research

    Talk Title: From EDA to NDA: Treating Networks like Hardware Circuits

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Surveys reveal that network outages are prevalent, and outages take hours to resolve, resulting in significant lost revenue. We suggest fresh approaches based on verification and synthesis.

    First, I show how to exploit physical symmetry to scale network verification for large data centers. While Emerson and Sistla showed how to exploit symmetry for model checking in 1996, they exploited symmetry on the logical Kripke structure. We factor the symmetries into symmetries on headers and symmetries on the physical topology.

    I will then describe work we have done in synthesis. I will set the stage by describing a reconfigurable router architecture called RMT and an emerging language for programming routers called P4 (that promises to extend the boundaries of Software Designed Networks). I will then describe two synthesis efforts for flexible routers, one akin to register allocation (table layout) and one akin to code generation (packet transactions). I will focus especially on code generation and show that the all-or-nothing compilation required for wire-speed forwarding requires adapting standard compiler techniques.

    These results suggest that concepts from Electronic Design Automation (EDA) can be leveraged to create what might be termed Network Design Automation (NDA). I end by briefly exploring this vision. This is joint work with collaborators at Edinburgh, MSR, MIT, Stanford, and University of Washington.

    Biography: George Varghese received his Ph.D. in 1992 from MIT. From 1993-1999, he was a professor at Washington University, and at UCSD from 1999 to 2013. He was the Distinguished Visitor in the computer science department at Stanford University from 2010-2011. He joined Microsoft Research in 2012. His book "Network Algorithmics" was published in December 2004 by Morgan-Kaufman. In May 2004, he co-founded NetSift, which was acquired by Cisco Systems in 2005. With colleagues, he has won best paper awards at SIGCOMM (2014), ANCS (2013), OSDI (2008), PODC (1996), and the IETF Applied Networking Prize (2013). He has won lifetime awards in networking from the EE (Kobayashi Award) and CS communities (SIGCOMM) in 2014.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • Band-Engineered Complex Oxide Interfaces: New Insights and Opportunities

    Thu, Feb 11, 2016 @ 12:45 PM - 01:45 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Professor Bharat Jalan, University of Minnesota

    Talk Title: Band-Engineered Complex Oxide Interfaces: New Insights and Opportunities

    Series: Graduate Seminar

    Abstract: Complex oxide heterostructures can show strong correlation effects, novel magnetism, high breakdown voltage, and high 2D electron density (of the order of 1014 cm-2), unattainable in traditional semiconductor heterostructures. High 2D electron densities are of particular interest for studying low-dimensional physics in narrow d-band materials, in addition to fabricating novel plasmonic field-effect devices (FETs). Recent advances in thin film growth approaches have enabled the growth of this material class in thin film and heterostructure forms with pristine structural quality (similar to that of the conventional semiconductors). However the grand challenge in the field is to obtain these materials with the high level of stoichiometric and defect control. In this talk, I will present my groups effort to address these challenges and to utilize intrinsic defects as a new degree of freedom to control materials electronic and magnetic property using the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach. In particular, I will discuss the role of intrinsic defects in realizing and tailoring the 2D electron gas at perovskite oxide heterojunctions.

    I will then present a novel approach for creating high-density 2DEGs at perovskite heterojunction using internal charge transfer. 2D carrier density much higher density than expected based on resolution of the polar discontinuity at perovskite oxide heterojunctions can be achieved via internal charge transfer using band-engineered interfaces. Combining DFT modeling and experiments using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electronic transport measurements, I will discuss the origin of these carriers, dimensionality and transport mechanisms. Finally, I will discuss how electron and hole doping via band-engineered approaches can be achieved, which may provide an exceptional route to revisit the electronic phase diagrams of transition metal oxides in the clean doping limit.

    This work is supported through the University of Minnesota MRSEC under awards DMR-1420013.


    Host: Professor Jayakanth Ravichandran

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Martin Olekszyk

    OutlookiCal
  • Faculty Candidate Seminar

    Thu, Feb 11, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Private, Private

    Talk Title: Ambiguous Joint Chance Constraints Under Mean and Dispersion Information

    Host: Epstein Department of ISE

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Michele ISE

    OutlookiCal
  • Communications, Networks & Systems (CommNetS) Seminar

    Thu, Feb 11, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Michael Friedlander, UC Davis

    Talk Title: Level-set methods for convex optimization

    Series: CommNetS

    Abstract: Convex optimization problems in a variety of applications have favorable objectives but complicating constraints, and first-order methods are not immediately applicable. We propose an approach that exchanges the roles of the objective and constraint functions, and instead approximately solves a sequence of parametric problems. We describe the theoretical and practical properties of this approach for a broad range of problems, including low-rank semidefinite optimization problems.
    Joint work with A. Aravkin, J. Burke, D. Drusvyatskiy, S. Roy.

    Biography: Michael P. Friedlander is a Professor of mathematics at the University of California, Davis. He received his PhD in Operations Research from Stanford University in 2002, and his BA in Physics from Cornell University in 1993. From 2002 to 2004 he was the Wilkinson Fellow in Scientific Computing at Argonne National Laboratory. He has held visiting positions at UCLA's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics (2010), and at Berkeley's Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing (2013). He serves on the editorial boards of SIAM J. on Optimization, SIAM J. on Matrix Analysis and Applications, SIAM J. on Scientific Computing, and Mathematical Programming Computation. His research is primarily in developing numerical methods for large-scale optimization, their software implementation, and applying these to problems in signal processing and machine learning.

    Host: Mahdi Soltanolkotabi

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

    OutlookiCal
  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. Seminar

    Thu, Feb 11, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Shiho Kawashima, Columbia University

    Talk Title: Thixotropy of Fresh Cement-Based Systems

    Abstract: Over its lifetime, cement-based materials transition from behaving as a near-Newtonian fluid to a viscoelastic fluid-solid to eventually a rock-like solid. And although the first two phases are fleeting compared to the third phase, this earlier life period is intimately tied to materials processing.
    Therefore the corresponding properties are critical in determining the efficiency of the placement process during construction, as well as the eventual performance of the structure in place. This requires that the rheological properties of the material be well characterized and controlled. During placement the material undergoes a wide range of deformations -“ very large during processes such as pouring and pumping, but then diminishingly small after placement when it is essentially at rest. This talk will cover studies that investigate the specific rheological aspect of thixotropy in cement paste and mortar systems that incorporate highly-purified attapulgite clay through static shear and dynamic rheological protocols that span wide timescales and magnitudes of deformations and rates.



    Biography:
    Shiho Kawashima is an Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at Columbia University. Her work is in experimental cement and concrete research, which aims to tie nano-microstructural behavior to macroscale structural response. She specializes in cement rheology, particularly in the development of innovative measurement techniques to further the understanding of the structural and temporal evolution of the fresh-state microstructure of cementitious systems. She is also interested in the design of nanocomposites and sustainable infrastructural materials. She received her B.S. in Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at Columbia University, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering at Northwestern University.


    Host: Dr. Erik Johnson

    Location: Biegler Hall of Engineering (BHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

    OutlookiCal
  • Multi-scale integration and modularity in complex dynamical systems

    Fri, Feb 12, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Artemy Kolchinsky, Santa Fe Institute

    Talk Title: AI Seminar-Multi-scale integration and modularity in complex dynamical systems

    Series: Artificial Intelligence Seminar

    Abstract: I will discuss two novel approaches to studying distributed organization in complex dynamical systems. In the first [1], we define an information-theoretic measure of the strength of integration at multiple scales, where scale is defined according to an underlying distance metric. We show that our method generalizes several existing complexity measures and is tractable to compute. As demonstrated on human resting state fMRI time-series data, it also captures important aspects of integration in network- and spatially-embedded systems.
    In the second approach [2], we address modularity, a pattern of organization in which a system is composed of weakly-coupled subsystems. We develop a technique to decompose dynamical systems based on the idea that modules constrain the spread of perturbations. The method captures variation of modular organization across different system states, time scales, and in response to different kinds of perturbations. It also offers a principled alternative to community detection applied to statistical-dependency networks (e.g. correlation matrices or "functional networks").

    [1] A Kolchinsky, MP van den Heuvel, A Griffa, P Hagmann, LM Rocha, O Sporns and J Goñi, Multi-scale Integration and Predictability in Resting State Brain Activity, Frontiers Neuroinformatics, 2014. http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fninf.2014.00066/abstract

    [2] A Kolchinsky, AJ Gates, and LM Rocha, Modularity and the spread of perturbations in complex dynamical systems, PRE, 2015. http://arxiv.org/abs/1509.04386




    Biography: Artemy Kolchinsky received his PhD from the Center for Complex Systems and Networks, Dept of Informatics, Indiana University Bloomington in 2015. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Santa Fe Institute, collaborating on projects involving optimal compression of dynamical systems as well as thermodynamic constraints on computation. He is broadly interested in novel methods for understanding multivariate dynamics in application to computational neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and other complex systems.


    Host: Greg Ver Steeg

    Webcast: http://webcasterms1.isi.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=f413ecae075e40eaa3f6b51123178b791

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    WebCast Link: http://webcasterms1.isi.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=f413ecae075e40eaa3f6b51123178b791d

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

    OutlookiCal
  • Facebook's Datacenter and Backbone Networks

    Fri, Feb 12, 2016 @ 12:00 PM - 01:20 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Rishi Sinha, Facebook

    Talk Title: Facebook's Datacenter and Backbone Networks

    Abstract: This talk will cover the design, operational, performance and capacity issues in global networking for large online services, using Facebook as a case study. We will describe Facebook's datacenter and backbone network architecture, explain the characteristics and unique demands of traffic generated in serving a billion daily users, detail the motivations for Facebook's decisions to adopt a next-generation fabric network architecture and to design its own network switches and accompanying operating system, and provide insights into the protocol and software engineering work that is applied to solving performance and capacity challenges in Facebook's network. Finally, we will point to open areas for research and commercialization.

    Biography: Dr. Sinha is a performance capacity engineer at Facebook and leads several projects on server capacity planning, network capacity planning, efficiency, and data center logistics. Prior to joining Facebook at 2012, he worked at Brocade where he developed analysis tools for flow control bottlenecks in storage networks, and at Akamai where he worked on reliability of real-time streaming. He has extensive experience in packet flow analysis, experimentation and implementation of internet-scale systems and has four patents on networking related technologies. Dr. Sinha is a Trojan and completed his PhD at USC in 2006.

    Host: Alefiya Hussain

    Location: Mark Taper Hall Of Humanities (THH) - 210

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Alefiya Hussain

    OutlookiCal
  • Systems Cellular-Molecular Bioengineering Distinguished Speaker Series

    Fri, Feb 12, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Elliot Botvinick, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, UC Irvine

    Talk Title: Feeling Pericellular Mechanical Heterogeneities

    Abstract: While there is strong evidence for roles of bulk stromal stiffness in cell regulation, roles for the pericellular mechanical microenvironment are less clear, in large part due to the difficulty of measurement. My group implements automated Active Microrheology (aAMR), an optical tweezers technology, to probe extracellular stiffness and map it in the volume surrounding cells. Our aAMR applies sinusoidal optical forces onto microbeads embedded within natural extracellular matrices (ECMs), including those comprised of fibrin and type 1 collagen. As in the case of passive microrheology, aAMR reports the complex material response function of the ECM just surrounding each microbead. Different from passive methods, aAMR is valid for systems not in thermal equilibrium, as is typical for regions of the ECM near to contractile cells. Our aAMR microscope can probe many beads surrounding each cell to map the mechanical landscape, allowing us to seek correlations between local stiffness distributions and cell properties such as contractility, signaling, and differentiation. I will present specific examples for which the distribution of pericellular stiffness correlates with cell phenotype/state including: MT1-MMP deficient mesenchymal stem cells, human aortic smooth muscle cells with compromised contractility and fibrosarcoma cells cultured in type 1 collagen gels.

    Biography: My research program has two areas of focus: mechanobiology and medical device development. My research group uses photonic tools to investigate roles for mechanical forces and physical properties in the regulation of tissues. We have expertise in the areas of photonics, laser ablation, imaging, tissue engineering and mechanobiology. Specifically, we develop instrumentation and devices for quantitative biophysical measurements towards the study of single molecule biophysics and cell-tissue physical interactions. In particular, we use optical tweezers to measure single receptor-ligand interactions and have discovered strong evidence for the role of ligand-endocytic forces in the activation of the Notch receptor. We also use optical tweezers/scissors to measure local continuum viscoelastic parameters in order to seek correlations between microenvironment mechanics and cell function. We have applied these tools to test mechanical hypotheses in the areas of cancer biology, microvascular morphogenesis, tissue engineering, stem cell biology and the transition of ductal carcinoma in situ into an invasive phenotype.

    Host: Megan McCain

    More Information: botvinick_flyer.pdf

    Location: Corwin D. Denney Research Center (DRB) - 146

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Megan McCain

    OutlookiCal
  • Munushian Seminar - Rahul Sarpeshkar, Friday, February 12th at 2:00pm in EEB 132

    Fri, Feb 12, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Rahul Sarpeshkar, Dartmouth College

    Talk Title: Analog and Stochastic Computation in Living Cells and Supercomputing Chips

    Abstract: Despite more than 15 years of research, synthetic circuits in living cells have been largely limited to a handful of digital logic gates and have not scaled. We show that one important reason for this failure to scale is an overemphasis on digital abstractions rather than on recognizing the true noisy, analog, and probabilistic nature of biological circuits. We show that synthetic and natural DNA, RNA, and protein circuits in cells must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic, and hybrid analog-digital computational approaches to function; otherwise, even relatively simple computations in cells will exceed energy, molecular-count, and cellular-resource budgets.
    Analog circuits in electronics and molecular circuits in cell biology are also deeply connected: There are astounding similarities between the equations that describe noisy electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and the equations that describe noisy molecular flow in chemical reactions, both of which obey the laws of exponential thermodynamics. Based on these similarities, it is possible to take a principled approach to design circuits in living cells. For example, we have engineered logarithmic analog computation in living cells with less than three transcription factors, almost two orders of magnitude more efficient than prior digital approaches to create a "bio-molecular slide rule". In addition, highly computationally intensive noisy DNA-protein and protein-protein networks can be rapidly simulated in mixed-signal supercomputing chips that naturally capture their noisiness, dynamics, and non-modular interactions at lightning-fast speeds. Such an approach may enable large-scale design, analysis, simulation, and measurement of cells to be more precise and robust than it is today. To realize the promise of synthetic biology and systems biology for medicine, biotechnology, agriculture, and energy, we will need to go back to the future of computation and design and implement circuits via a collective analog approach like Nature does. We must also exploit and develop existing analog and mixed-signal electronic design tools for enabling biological design to scale.

    Biography: Rahul Sarpeshkar is the Thomas E. Kurtz Professor and a Professor in the departments of Engineering, Microbiology & Immunology, Physics, and Physiology & Neurobiology at Dartmouth College. His research creates novel wet DNA-protein circuits in living cells and also advanced dry nanoelectronic circuits on silicon chips. His longstanding work on analog and biological computation and his most recent work have helped pioneer the field of analog synthetic biology. His work on a glucose fuel cell for medical implants was featured by Scientific American among 2012's 10 World Changing Ideas.
    He holds over 36 awarded patents and has authored more than 127 publication, including one that was featured on the cover of Nature. His recent book, Ultra Low Power Bioelectronics: Fundamentals, Biomedical Applications, and Bio-inspired Systems revealed the deep connections between analog transistor circuits and biochemical circuits. His work has led to several first or best records in analog, bio-inspired, synthetic biology, medical device, ultra low power, and energy harvesting systems. His work has applications in implantable medical devices for the deaf, blind, and paralyzed and in biotechnology and medical applications that benefit from cellular engineering. He has received several awards including the NSF Career Award, the ONR Young Investigator Award, and the Packard Fellows Award. He received Bachelor's degrees in Electrical Engineering and Physics at MIT and PhD at CalTech. Before he joined Dartmouth's faculty, he was a tenured professor at MIT where he led the Analog Circuits and Biological Systems Group. Before he joined MIT, he was a member of the technical staff of Bell Labs' division of biological computation.

    Host: EE-EP

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

    OutlookiCal
  • NL Seminar-Recent Advances in Neural Machine Translation

    Fri, Feb 12, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Thang Luong, Stanford University

    Talk Title: Recent Advances in Neural Machine Translation

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: Neural Machine Translation (NMT) is a simple new architecture for getting machines to learn to translate. At its core, NMT is a single big recurrent neural network that is trained end-to-end with several advantages such as simplicity and generalization. Despite being relatively new, NMT has already been showing promising results in various translation tasks. In this talk, I will give an overview of NMT and highlight my recent work on (a) how to address the rare word problem in NMT, (b) how to improve the attention (alignment) mechanism, and (c) how to leverage data from other modalities to improve translation.



    Biography: Thang Luong is currently a 5th-year PhD student in the Stanford NLP group under Prof. Chris Manning. In the past, he has published papers on various different NLP-related areas such as digital library, machine translation, speech recognition, parsing, psycholinguistics, and word embedding learning. Recently, his main interest shifts towards the area of deep learning using sequence to sequence models to tackle various NLP problems, especially neural machine translation. He has built state-of-the-art (academically) neural machine translation systems both at Google and at Stanford.

    Host: Xing Shi and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 6th Flr Conf Rm # 689, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

    OutlookiCal
  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Feb 15, 2016 @ 12:30 PM - 01:49 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: NO CLASS, HOLIDAY, NO CLASS, HOLIDAY

    Talk Title: NO CLASS, HOLIDAY

    Host: K. Kirk Shung, PhD

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

    OutlookiCal
  • MHI Distinguished Visitor Talk

    Tue, Feb 16, 2016 @ 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Petros Maragos, School of E.C.E., National Technical University of Athens, Greece

    Talk Title: Action and Gesture Recognition in Human-Robot Interaction

    Abstract: In this talk we will present some advances from our research in the EU project MOBOT which generally aims at the development of an intelligent active mobility assistance robot. We will focus on one of its main goals: to provide multimodal sensory processing capabilities for human action recognition. Specifically, a reliable multimodal information processing and action recognition system needs to be developed, that will detect, analyze and recognize the human user actions based on the captured multimodal sensory signals and with a reasonable level of accuracy and detail for intelligent assistive robotics. One of the main thrusts in the above effort is the development of robust and effective computer vision techniques to achieve the visual processing goals based on multiple cues such as spatiotemporal RGB appearance data as well as depth data from Kinect sensors. Another major challenge is the integration of recognizing specific verbal and gestural commands in the considered human-robot interaction context. In this presentation we summarize advancements in three tasks of the above multimodal processing system for human-robot interaction (HRI): action recognition, gesture recognition and spoken command recognition. More information, related papers and current results can be found in http://cvsp.cs.ntua.gr and http://robotics.ntua.gr

    Biography: Petros Maragos received the Diploma in E.E. from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) in 1980 and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from Georgia Tech, Atlanta, in 1982 and 1985. In 1985, he joined the faculty of the Division of Applied Sciences at Harvard University, where he worked for eight years as professor of electrical engineering affiliated with the Harvard Robotics Lab. In 1993, he joined the faculty of the School of ECE at Georgia Tech. During periods of 1996-98 he had a joint appointment as director of research at the Institute of Language and Speech Processing in Athens. Since 1998, he has been working as a professor at the NTUA School of ECE. He has held a visiting scientist position at MIT LIDS in fall 2012. He is currently the Director of the NTUA Division of Signals, Control and Robotics, and the Director of the Intelligent Robotics and Automation Lab. His research and teaching interests include signal processing, systems theory, pattern recognition, image processing and computer vision, audio and speech/language processing, cognitive systems, and robotics. In the above areas he has published numerous papers, book chapters, and has also co-edited three Springer research books, one on multimodal processing and interaction and two on shape analysis. He has served as: Associate Editor for the IEEE Trans. on ASSP, IEEE Trans. on PAMI, and editorial board member and guest editor for several journals on signal processing, image analysis and vision; co-organizer of several conferences and workshops, including VCIP 1992 (GC), ISMM 1996 (GC), VLBV 2001 (GC), MMSP 2007 (GC), ECCV 2010 (PC), ECCV 2010 Workshop on Sign, Gesture and Activity, EUSIPCO 2012 (TC), 2011 & 2014 Dagstuhl Symposia on Shape, 2015 IROS Workshop on Cognitive Mobility Assistance Robots; member of the IEEE committees on DSP, IMDSP and MMSP. He is currently organizing EUSIPCO 2017 (GC).

    His is the recipient or co-recipient of several awards for his academic work, including a 1983 Sigma Xi best thesis award, a 1987-1992 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, a 1988 IEEE SPS Young Author Best Paper Award, a 1994 IEEE SPS Senior Best Paper Award, the 1995 IEEE W.R.G. Baker Prize Award, the 1996 Pattern Recognition Society's Honorable Mention Award, the EURASIP 2007 Technical Achievement Award for contributions to nonlinear signal, image and speech processing, and the Best Paper Award of the IEEE CVPR-2011 Gesture Recognition Workshop. He was elected a Fellow of IEEE in 1995 and a Fellow of EURASIP in 2010 for his research contributions.

    Host: Prof. Shrikanth Narayanan, Theodora Chaspari, and Zisis Skordilis

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Tanya Acevedo-Lam/EE-Systems

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Haipeng Luo (Princeton) -Optimal and Adaptive Online Learning

    Tue, Feb 16, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Haipeng Luo , Princeton

    Talk Title: Optimal and Adaptive Online Learning

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Online learning is one of the most important and well-established learning models in machine learning. Generally speaking, the goal of online learning is to make a sequence of accurate predictions "on the fly" when interacting with the environment. Online learning has been extensively studied in recent years, and has also become of great interest to practitioners due to its applicability to large scale applications such as advertisement placement and recommendation systems.

    In this talk, I will present novel, optimal and adaptive online learning algorithms for three problems. The first problem is online boosting, a theory of boosting the accuracy of any existing online learning algorithms; the second problem is on combining expert advice more efficiently and adaptively when making online predictions; the last part of the talk is about using data sketching techniques to obtain efficient online learning algorithms that make use of second order information and have robust performance against ill-conditioned data.

    Biography: Haipeng Luo is currently a fifth year graduate student working with Prof. Rob Schapire at Princeton. His main research interest is in theoretical and applied machine learning, with a focus on adaptive and robust online learning and its connections to boosting, optimization, stochastic learning and game theory. He won the Wu Prize for Excellence and two best paper awards (ICML and NIPS) in 2015.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • Faculty Candidate Seminar

    Tue, Feb 16, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Private, Private

    Talk Title: Machine Learning Tools for Finding Decision-Oriented Patterns in Data

    Host: Epstein Department of ISE

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Michele ISE

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Baris Akgun (Georgia Institute of Technology) - Robots Interactively Learning and Exploring with People

    Tue, Feb 16, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Baris Akgun, Georgia Institute of Technology

    Talk Title: Robots Interactively Learning and Exploring with People

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Robots are destined to move beyond the "caged" factory floors towards domains where they will be interacting closely with humans. They will encounter highly varied environments, scenarios and user demands. As a result, end-users
    programming robots after deployment will be an important requirement.

    In this talk, I will present results of studies with non-expert people teaching robots by demonstration and algorithms developed based on the lessons learned. My main observation is these users concentrate on achieving the goal of the demonstrated skills rather than providing good quality demonstrations. I will describe a learning from demonstration approach that leverages this goal directed behavior of users and is able to continue self-improvement on these learned models after the end-user leaves, an important step toward life-long learning. I will then talk about results of an experiment with non-expert teachers on an interactive approach that incorporates all the methods and algorithms I have introduced thus far. The work presented represents one example in a larger agenda of human-centered learning from demonstration, I conclude with a discussion of grand challenges ahead.

    Biography: Baris Akgun is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D. in Robotics from Georgia Institute of Technology under Assoc. Prof. Dr. Andrea Thomaz where he worked on developing algorithms and interactions that enable robots to learn from non-expert teachers and to use their learned information to autonomously get better over time. He received his M.Sc. degree in Computer Engineering in 2010 from METU working on affordance learning and mirror neuron inspired learning from demonstration under Assoc. Prof. Dr. Erol Sahin. .He received his B.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering with an extracurricular minor in Mechatronics in 2007. His research interests lie at the intersection of human-robot interaction and machine learning for robotics. He is currently working on deploying his developed methodologies in a household setting with non-expert teachers. His research was funded by the NSF and the ONR. He was a recipient of the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) scholarship for his M.Sc and the Fulbright Scholarship for his Ph.D.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Arjun Radhakrishnan (U. Pennsylvania) - Performance-aware Repair for Concurrent Programs

    Wed, Feb 17, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Arjun Radhakrishnan, U. Pennsylvania

    Talk Title: Performance-aware Repair for Concurrent Programs

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    We present a recent line of work on automated synthesis of synchronization constructs for concurrent programs. Our techniques are inspired by a study of the most common types of concurrency bugs and bugs-fixes in Linux device-drivers. As opposed to classical techniques which tend to use expensive synchronization constructs, our technique attempts to use inexpensive program transformations, such as reordering independent statements, to improve the performance of generated fixes.

    Our techniques are based on the observation that a large fraction of concurrency bugs are data-independent. This observations allow us to characterize and fix concurrency bugs based only on the order of execution of the statements involved. We evaluated our techniques on several real concurrency bugs that occurred in Linux device drivers, and showed that our synthesis procedure is able to produce more efficient and "programmer-like" bug-fixes.

    We finish by talk with a brief note on the general theme of soft specifications, such as performance and energy consumption, in program synthesis. Specifically, we will discuss the use of quantitative specifications and their applications to resource management in embedded and cyber-physical systems.


    Biography: Arjun Radhakrishna is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, he completed his PhD at the Institute of Science and Technology, Austria advised by Prof. Thomas A. Henzinger. His research focuses primarily on using programming language techniques, specifically, automated program synthesis, for rigorous systems engineering. His current research interests include the use of alternative specification mechanisms to capture subtle soft requirements on computing systems, such as program performance, energy consumption, or a program's robustness to errors. He is also interested in verification and synthesis of concurrent programs, in particular, device drivers.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • MHI Distinguished Visitor Talk

    Wed, Feb 17, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Petros Maragos, School of E.C.E., National Technical University of Athens, Greece

    Talk Title: Signal Processing and Dynamical Systems on Weighted Lattices

    Abstract: In this talk we will present a new unifying theoretical framework of nonlinear signal processing operators and dynamical systems that obey a superposition of a weighted max-min type and evolve on nonlinear spaces which we call complete weighted lattices. Special cases of such systems have found applications in morphological image analysis and vision scale-spaces, in control of discrete-event dynamical systems with minimax algebra, in speech recognition as weighted finite-state transducers, and in belief propagation on graphical models. Our theoretical approach establishes their representation in state and input-output spaces using monotone lattice operators, finds analytically their state and output responses using nonlinear convolutions of a weighted max-min type, studies their stability and reachability, and provides optimal solutions to solving max-min matrix equations. The talk will emphasize the main concepts and theoretical results in this broad field using weighted lattice algebra and will outline some application areas.

    Biography: Petros Maragos received the Diploma in E.E. from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) in 1980 and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from Georgia Tech, Atlanta, in 1982 and 1985. In 1985, he joined the faculty of the Division of Applied Sciences at Harvard University, where he worked for eight years as professor of electrical engineering affiliated with the Harvard Robotics Lab. In 1993, he joined the faculty of the School of ECE at Georgia Tech. During periods of 1996-98 he had a joint appointment as director of research at the Institute of Language and Speech Processing in Athens. Since 1998, he has been working as a professor at the NTUA School of ECE. He has held a visiting scientist position at MIT LIDS in fall 2012. He is currently the Director of the NTUA Division of Signals, Control and Robotics, and the Director of the Intelligent Robotics and Automation Lab. His research and teaching interests include signal processing, systems theory, pattern recognition, image processing and computer vision, audio and speech/language processing, cognitive systems, and robotics. In the above areas he has published numerous papers, book chapters, and has also co-edited three Springer research books, one on multimodal processing and interaction and two on shape analysis. He has served as: Associate Editor for the IEEE Trans. on ASSP, IEEE Trans. on PAMI, and editorial board member and guest editor for several journals on signal processing, image analysis and vision; co-organizer of several conferences and workshops, including VCIP 1992 (GC), ISMM 1996 (GC), VLBV 2001 (GC), MMSP 2007 (GC), ECCV 2010 (PC), ECCV 2010 Workshop on Sign, Gesture and Activity, EUSIPCO 2012 (TC), 2011 & 2014 Dagstuhl Symposia on Shape, 2015 IROS Workshop on Cognitive Mobility Assistance Robots; member of the IEEE committees on DSP, IMDSP and MMSP. He is currently organizing EUSIPCO 2017 (GC).

    His is the recipient or co-recipient of several awards for his academic work, including a 1983 Sigma Xi best thesis award, a 1987-1992 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, a 1988 IEEE SPS Young Author Best Paper Award, a 1994 IEEE SPS Senior Best Paper Award, the 1995 IEEE W.R.G. Baker Prize Award, the 1996 Pattern Recognition Society's Honorable Mention Award, the EURASIP 2007 Technical Achievement Award for contributions to nonlinear signal, image and speech processing, and the Best Paper Award of the IEEE CVPR-2011 Gesture Recognition Workshop. He was elected a Fellow of IEEE in 1995 and a Fellow of EURASIP in 2010 for his research contributions.

    Host: Prof. Shrikanth Narayanan, Theodora Chaspari, and Zisis Skordilis

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Tanya Acevedo-Lam/EE-Systems

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Alec Jacobson (Columbia University) - Breaking Barriers between Humans and Geometry

    Thu, Feb 18, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Alec Jacobson, Columbia University

    Talk Title: Breaking Barriers between Humans and Geometry

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    In the field of geometry processing, I work to make sense of existing geometric data and provide interfaces to put that data to further use. Today, we find many sources of geometric data and increasingly find useful applications effecting our daily lives. Climate analysis, self-driving cars, 3d-printed prosthetics, virtual dressing rooms and video games all share the essential tasks of collecting, processing and utilizing geometric data.
    Unfortunately, barriers stand between geometric data and the people who want to analyze and understand that data. Potential consumers and content creators cannot access or edit geometry because of poor human-computer interfaces. Meanwhile, some data never reaches its intended users because processing breaks down due to lack of robustness to noise.
    My long-term research goal is to dismantle the barriers between humans and geometry. In this talk, I will show how I attack this problem on both fronts. I bring ideas from differential geometry and finite-element analysis to model geometric problems more intuitively and more robustly. Meanwhile, I pursue better user interfaces to reduce human effort and increase creative or scientific exploration of geometric data. I will present my work in robust geometry processing, higher-order PDEs, real-time shape articulation, and fabricating user interfaces. Each parallel branch of investigation, while self-motivating, complements the others, and together they invite exciting new directions for future research.

    Biography: Alec Jacobson is a post-doctoral researcher at Columbia University working with Prof. Eitan Grinspun. He received a PhD in Computer Science from ETH Zurich, and an MA and BA in Computer Science and Mathematics from the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University. His thesis on real-time deformation techniques for 2D and 3D shapes was awarded the ETH Medal and the Eurographics Best PhD award. Leveraging ideas from differential geometry and finite-element analysis, his work in geometry processing improves exposure of geometric quantities, while his novel user interfaces reduce human effort and increase exploration. He has published several papers in the proceedings of SIGGRAPH. He leads development of the geometry processing library, libigl, winner of the 2015 SGP software award.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • Faculty Candidate Seminar

    Thu, Feb 18, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Pro, Private

    Talk Title: The Power of Nonconvex Paradigms for High-Dimensional Estimation

    Host: Epstein Department of ISE

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Michele ISE

    OutlookiCal
  • MHI Distinguished Visitor Talk

    Thu, Feb 18, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Petros Maragos, School of E.C.E., National Technical University of Athens, Greece

    Talk Title: Audio-Visual Attention, Computational Saliency and Movie Summarization

    Abstract: In this talk we will present an overview of ideas, methods and research results in multimodal sensory processing with emphasis on audio-visual signal fusion as applied to problems of attention and multimodal event detection for information summarization. We shall begin with a brief synopsis of important findings from audio-visual perception. Then we shall outline efficient signal processing front-ends and improved computational saliency models for audio and visual salient event detection, followed by fusion schemes for multimodal saliency estimation. This will lead to movie video summarization based on audio, visual, and text modalities. For objective evaluations we have developed a movie database, which includes sensory and semantic saliency annotation as well as cross-media relations. The above research has been conducted in the framework of the Greek basic research project COGNIMUSE.
    More information, related papers and current results can be found in http://cvsp.cs.ntua.gr and http://cognimuse.cs.ntua.gr

    Biography: Petros Maragos received the Diploma in E.E. from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) in 1980 and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from Georgia Tech, Atlanta, in 1982 and 1985. In 1985, he joined the faculty of the Division of Applied Sciences at Harvard University, where he worked for eight years as professor of electrical engineering affiliated with the Harvard Robotics Lab. In 1993, he joined the faculty of the School of ECE at Georgia Tech. During periods of 1996-98 he had a joint appointment as director of research at the Institute of Language and Speech Processing in Athens. Since 1998, he has been working as a professor at the NTUA School of ECE. He has held a visiting scientist position at MIT LIDS in fall 2012. He is currently the Director of the NTUA Division of Signals, Control and Robotics, and the Director of the Intelligent Robotics and Automation Lab. His research and teaching interests include signal processing, systems theory, pattern recognition, image processing and computer vision, audio and speech/language processing, cognitive systems, and robotics. In the above areas he has published numerous papers, book chapters, and has also co-edited three Springer research books, one on multimodal processing and interaction and two on shape analysis. He has served as: Associate Editor for the IEEE Trans. on ASSP, IEEE Trans. on PAMI, and editorial board member and guest editor for several journals on signal processing, image analysis and vision; co-organizer of several conferences and workshops, including VCIP 1992 (GC), ISMM 1996 (GC), VLBV 2001 (GC), MMSP 2007 (GC), ECCV 2010 (PC), ECCV 2010 Workshop on Sign, Gesture and Activity, EUSIPCO 2012 (TC), 2011 & 2014 Dagstuhl Symposia on Shape, 2015 IROS Workshop on Cognitive Mobility Assistance Robots; member of the IEEE committees on DSP, IMDSP and MMSP. He is currently organizing EUSIPCO 2017 (GC).

    His is the recipient or co-recipient of several awards for his academic work, including a 1983 Sigma Xi best thesis award, a 1987-1992 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, a 1988 IEEE SPS Young Author Best Paper Award, a 1994 IEEE SPS Senior Best Paper Award, the 1995 IEEE W.R.G. Baker Prize Award, the 1996 Pattern Recognition Society's Honorable Mention Award, the EURASIP 2007 Technical Achievement Award for contributions to nonlinear signal, image and speech processing, and the Best Paper Award of the IEEE CVPR-2011 Gesture Recognition Workshop. He was elected a Fellow of IEEE in 1995 and a Fellow of EURASIP in 2010 for his research contributions.

    Host: Prof. Shrikanth Narayanan, Theodora Chaspari, and Zisis Skordilis

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Tanya Acevedo-Lam/EE-Systems

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Animashree Anandkumar (UC Irvine)

    Thu, Feb 18, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Animashree Anandkumar, UC Irvine

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Event details will be added closer to the date.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • EE-EP Seminar - Kejie Fang, Friday, February 19th at 2:00pm in EEB 132

    Fri, Feb 19, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Kejie Fang, California Institute of Technology

    Talk Title: Integrated Hybrid Photonics-”Emergent Control and Application for Light and Sound at Nanoscale

    Abstract: The bottleneck of bandwidth limitation and power dissipation in today's electronic microchips is conflicting with the exceeding demand for information communication and processing. Light, due to its intrinsic high frequency and environment-insensitivity (owing to its charge neutrality), is expected to bring solutions to this fundamental challenge. By the same token, certain functionalities in optical information processing will require a hybrid architecture interfacing different materials and light-matter interactions. With technical advances in nanofabrication, it is now possible to manipulate light and enhance light-matter interactions in on-chip, nanoscale photonic structures.
    In this talk, I will present my research in two integrated hybrid photonic architectures. First is optoelectronic integration, where we achieved novel active control of light through an electric drive which dynamically modulates the refractive index of silicon photonic structures, leading to an effective magnetic field for photons and topological light propagation. These novel interactions are unreachable in static or passive dielectrics and provide a solution for on-chip optical isolation that is essential for stable and energy efficient optical communication. In the second part of my talk, I will present work on another hybrid architecture that interfaces light and sound: optomechanical crystals. This architecture allows for simultaneously engineering of optical and mechanical properties as well as photon-phonon interactions. Combining electron beam lithography and scanning probe microscope tuning, we fabricated cavity-optomechanical circuits on silicon microchips to realize radiation-pressure controlled microwave phonon routing. We applied these devices for microwave-over-optical signal processing with low energy and high efficiency. The nanoscale mechanical vibration is also used to achieve optical non-reciprocity in the optomechanical circuit. These achievements hold promise for hybrid photonic technology for light-based communication and processing in an integrated, chip-scale platform.


    Biography: Kejie Fang is a Postdoctoral Scholar in Applied Physics at California Institute of Technology, working with Prof. Oskar Painter. He received his B.S. in physics from Peking University, and his M.S. in electrical engineering, Ph.D. in physics, both from Stanford University under the supervision of Prof. Shanhui Fan. Kejie's research interests include optomechanics, nanophotonics, and spin photonics, with a theme to develop novel chip scale devices and systems for light-based applications including optical information communication and processing. During his Ph.D., he proposed and demonstrated for the first time an effective magnetic field for photons which provides a solution for on-chip optical isolation. At Caltech, he developed integrated cavity-optomechanical circuits for on-chip information processing using nanoscale optical and acoustic excitations. Kejie has published 15 peer-reviewed papers in leading journals including Nature Photonics, Physical Review Letters, and Nature Communications. Kejie was a William R. and Sara Hart Kimball Fellow at Stanford University and also a recipient of OSA Outstanding Reviewer Award in 2014.

    Host: EE-Electrophysics

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

    OutlookiCal
  • NL Seminar Chasing vaccination in social media: Narrative discovery from an unstructured corpus of text

    Fri, Feb 19, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Ehsan Ebrahimzadeh , UCLA

    Talk Title: Chasing vaccination in social media: Narrative discovery from an unstructured corpus of text

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: The measles outbreak in California was a serious public health crisis. Health officials attributed the outbreak to the increasing number of children whose parents had secured exemptions from vaccination for various vaccine preventable diseases VPDs. We believe that exemption seeking is part of a broader culture of distrust driven in large part by stories circulating in social media. An under-standing of the dynamics of this broader culture is necessary if we are to develop health policies that do not simply address outcomes but rather the cultural basis for decisions leading to those outcomes. We reveal the dynamics of exemption seeking and the greater culture of distrust endemic to these sites by developing a generative statistical mechanical model where stories are represented as net- works with actants such as parents, medical professionals, and religious institutions as nodes, and their various relationships as edges. We estimate the latent but unknown stories circulating on these sites by modeling the posts as a sampling of the hidden story graph. Working with a data set of 2 million posts crawled from parenting sites over a 5 year period, we uncover a strong, persistent story signal in which parents, driven by a distrust of government and medical institutions, devise strategies to secure exemptions for their children from required vaccinations. In these stories, it is the vaccines and not the VPDs that pose a threat to the children. Our method of analyzing social media conversations and the exchange of stories at scale can provide an alert mechanism to health officials, help lay the groundwork for devising community-specific messaging interventions, and inform policy making.

    Biography: Ehsan Ebrahimzadeh is a PhD candidate in the Electrical Engineering Department of UCLA, where he is simultaneously working towards my his degree in Applied Mathematics. Broadly speaking, he is interested in Statistics, Applied probability, and Data Analytics. Before joining UCLA in 2013, he received his MASc degree in Electrical Engineering from University of Waterloo, and BSc degrees in Mathematics and Electrical Engineering from Isfahan University of Technology.

    Host: Xing Shi and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

    OutlookiCal
  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Black Belt

    Mon, Feb 22, 2016

    Professional Programs

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Abstract: Course Dates (15 Day Program)
    Week 1: February 22-26, 2016
    Week 2: April 11-15, 2016
    Week 3: May 2-6, 2016

    Learn the advanced problem-solving skills you need to implement the principles, practices and techniques of Six Sigma to maximize performance and cost reductions in your organization. During this three-week practitioner course, you will learn how to measure a process, analyze the results, develop process improvements and quantify the resulting savings. You will be required to complete a project demonstrating mastery of appropriate analytical methods and pass an examination to earn Six Sigma Black Belt Certificate.

    This practitioner course for Six Sigma implementation provides extensive coverage of the Six Sigma process as well as intensive exposure to the key analytical tools associated with Six Sigma, including project management, team skills, cost analysis, FMEA, basic statistics, inferential statistics, sampling, goodness of fit testing, regression and correlation analysis, reliability, design of experiments, statistical process control, measurement systems analysis and simulation. Computer applications are emphasized.

    More Info: https://gapp.usc.edu/professional-programs/short-courses/industrial-systems/six-sigma-black-belt

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Muhammad Naveed (UIUC) - Making the World a Better Place with Cryptography

    Mon, Feb 22, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Muhammad Naveed, UIUC

    Talk Title: Making the World a Better Place with Cryptography

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that the health records of up to 86% of the U.S. population have been hacked. The Ashley Madison breach revealed the private information of 37 million individuals and led to suicides and shattered families. The Apple iCloud breach led to the public release of nude photos of several celebrities. Data breaches like these abound.

    In this talk, I will first describe my research toward understanding the security of existing data breach prevention systems. To thwart data breaches, property-preserving encryption has been adopted in many encrypted database systems such as CryptDB, Microsoft Cipherbase, Google Encrypted BigQuery, SAP SEEED, and the soon-to-be-shipped Microsoft SQL Always Encrypted system. To simultaneously attain practicality and functionality, property-preserving encryption schemes permit the leakage of certain information such as the relative order of encrypted messages. I will explain the practical implications of permitting such leakage, and show in real-world contexts that property-preserving encryption often does not offer strong enough security.

    Next, I will describe an application-driven approach to developing practical cryptography to secure sensitive data. The approach involves collaborating with application domain experts to formulate the requirements; investigating whether a practical solution meeting the requirements is possible; and, if not, exploring the reasons behind it to relax the requirements so as to find a useful solution for the application. I will describe how I developed a cryptographic model called Controlled Functional Encryption (CFE), and how we can adopt CFE to address the privacy concerns in emerging applications such as personalized medicine.

    Biography: Muhammad Naveed is a PhD candidate at UIUC studying applied cryptography and systems security. In applied cryptography, he develops practical-yet-provably-secure cryptographic systems for real applications. In systems security, he explores the fundamental security flaws in popular systems and builds defense systems. His work has had a significant impact on Android security and has helped companies such as Google, Samsung, Facebook, and Amazon secure their products and services, improving security for millions of Android users. He is the recipient of the Google PhD Fellowship in Security, the Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Fellowship, the CS@Illinois C.W. Gear Outstanding Graduate Student Award, and the best paper award at the NYU CSAW Security Research Competition. He was also a finalist in the NYU CSAW Cybersecurity Policy Competition.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Feb 22, 2016 @ 12:30 PM - 01:49 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Rong Lu, Assistant Professor Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Keck School of Medicine

    Talk Title: TBA

    Biography: Professor Rong Lu's lab studies stem cell coordination, regulation and malfunction from a single cell perspective. They use mouse hematopoietic stem cells as a model system and integrate research strategies from various disciplines including molecular biology, cell biology, systems biology, genetics and bioinformatics. Her research focuses on understanding the differences between individual stem cells and how they coordinate with each other. These studies can provide new insights into the origin of diseases such as leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome as well as identify new therapeutic targets to treat them. http://pibbs.usc.edu/faculty/profile/?fid=457
    Host: K. Kirk Shung, PhD

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

    OutlookiCal
  • Faculty Candidate Seminar

    Mon, Feb 22, 2016 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Private, Private

    Talk Title: Searching for Many Hidden Objects

    Host: Epstein Department of ISE

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Michele ISE

    OutlookiCal
  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Black Belt

    Tue, Feb 23, 2016

    Professional Programs

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Abstract: Course Dates (15 Day Program)
    Week 1: February 22-26, 2016
    Week 2: April 11-15, 2016
    Week 3: May 2-6, 2016

    Learn the advanced problem-solving skills you need to implement the principles, practices and techniques of Six Sigma to maximize performance and cost reductions in your organization. During this three-week practitioner course, you will learn how to measure a process, analyze the results, develop process improvements and quantify the resulting savings. You will be required to complete a project demonstrating mastery of appropriate analytical methods and pass an examination to earn Six Sigma Black Belt Certificate.

    This practitioner course for Six Sigma implementation provides extensive coverage of the Six Sigma process as well as intensive exposure to the key analytical tools associated with Six Sigma, including project management, team skills, cost analysis, FMEA, basic statistics, inferential statistics, sampling, goodness of fit testing, regression and correlation analysis, reliability, design of experiments, statistical process control, measurement systems analysis and simulation. Computer applications are emphasized.

    More Info: https://gapp.usc.edu/professional-programs/short-courses/industrial-systems/six-sigma-black-belt

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Giuseppe Loianno (U. of Pennsylvania)

    Tue, Feb 23, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Giuseppe Loianno, U. of Pennsylvania

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Event details will be added closer to the date.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Vincent Liu (U. Washington) - Improving the Cost and Reliability of Data Center Networks

    Tue, Feb 23, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Vincent Liu , U. Washington

    Talk Title: Improving the Cost and Reliability of Data Center Networks

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    In recent years, data center networks have grown to an unprecedented scale. The largest of these are expected to connect hundreds of thousands of servers and are expected to do so with high reliability and low cost. The current solution to these problems is to use an idea first proposed for telephone networks in the early 1950's: Clos network topologies. These topologies have a number of substantial benefits, but their use in this new domain raises a set of questions.

    In this talk, I will present two systems that make small changes to state-of-the-art data center designs to provide large improvements to performance, reliability, and cost. I will first describe F10, a data center architecture that can provide both near-instantaneous reaction to failures and near-optimal handling of long-term load balancing. Central to this architecture is a novel network topology that provides all of the benefits of a traditional Clos topology, but also admits local reaction to and recovery from failures. I will also describe Subways, a network architecture that looks at how to use multiple network interfaces on each server to handle growth and performance issues in today's data centers.


    Biography: Vincent Liu is a PhD candidate in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. Before that, he completed his undergraduate degree in Computer Science at the University of Texas at Austin. His research is in the general area of networked systems across all layers of the networking stack, from hardware concerns to application and workload modeling. He has published in a variety of fields including data center networks, fault-tolerant distributed systems, energy-efficient wireless communication, and systems to preserve security and privacy. His work has won Best Paper Awards at NSDI 2013, ACM SIGCOMM 2013, and NSDI 2015. He was also awarded a Google PhD fellowship and Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Black Belt

    Wed, Feb 24, 2016

    Professional Programs

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Abstract: Course Dates (15 Day Program)
    Week 1: February 22-26, 2016
    Week 2: April 11-15, 2016
    Week 3: May 2-6, 2016

    Learn the advanced problem-solving skills you need to implement the principles, practices and techniques of Six Sigma to maximize performance and cost reductions in your organization. During this three-week practitioner course, you will learn how to measure a process, analyze the results, develop process improvements and quantify the resulting savings. You will be required to complete a project demonstrating mastery of appropriate analytical methods and pass an examination to earn Six Sigma Black Belt Certificate.

    This practitioner course for Six Sigma implementation provides extensive coverage of the Six Sigma process as well as intensive exposure to the key analytical tools associated with Six Sigma, including project management, team skills, cost analysis, FMEA, basic statistics, inferential statistics, sampling, goodness of fit testing, regression and correlation analysis, reliability, design of experiments, statistical process control, measurement systems analysis and simulation. Computer applications are emphasized.

    More Info: https://gapp.usc.edu/professional-programs/short-courses/industrial-systems/six-sigma-black-belt

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

    OutlookiCal
  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. Seminar

    Wed, Feb 24, 2016 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Nancy Love, Stanford University

    Talk Title: TBA

    Abstract: TBA

    Host: Dr. Adam Smith

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 102

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

    OutlookiCal
  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Black Belt

    Thu, Feb 25, 2016

    Professional Programs

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Abstract: Course Dates (15 Day Program)
    Week 1: February 22-26, 2016
    Week 2: April 11-15, 2016
    Week 3: May 2-6, 2016

    Learn the advanced problem-solving skills you need to implement the principles, practices and techniques of Six Sigma to maximize performance and cost reductions in your organization. During this three-week practitioner course, you will learn how to measure a process, analyze the results, develop process improvements and quantify the resulting savings. You will be required to complete a project demonstrating mastery of appropriate analytical methods and pass an examination to earn Six Sigma Black Belt Certificate.

    This practitioner course for Six Sigma implementation provides extensive coverage of the Six Sigma process as well as intensive exposure to the key analytical tools associated with Six Sigma, including project management, team skills, cost analysis, FMEA, basic statistics, inferential statistics, sampling, goodness of fit testing, regression and correlation analysis, reliability, design of experiments, statistical process control, measurement systems analysis and simulation. Computer applications are emphasized.

    More Info: https://gapp.usc.edu/professional-programs/short-courses/industrial-systems/six-sigma-black-belt

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Chao Wang (Virginia Tech)

    Thu, Feb 25, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Chao Wang, Virginia Tech

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Event details will be added closer to the date.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Hyun Oh Song (Stanford)

    Thu, Feb 25, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Hyun Oh Song, Stanford

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Event details will be added closer to the date.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Black Belt

    Fri, Feb 26, 2016

    Professional Programs

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Abstract: Course Dates (15 Day Program)
    Week 1: February 22-26, 2016
    Week 2: April 11-15, 2016
    Week 3: May 2-6, 2016

    Learn the advanced problem-solving skills you need to implement the principles, practices and techniques of Six Sigma to maximize performance and cost reductions in your organization. During this three-week practitioner course, you will learn how to measure a process, analyze the results, develop process improvements and quantify the resulting savings. You will be required to complete a project demonstrating mastery of appropriate analytical methods and pass an examination to earn Six Sigma Black Belt Certificate.

    This practitioner course for Six Sigma implementation provides extensive coverage of the Six Sigma process as well as intensive exposure to the key analytical tools associated with Six Sigma, including project management, team skills, cost analysis, FMEA, basic statistics, inferential statistics, sampling, goodness of fit testing, regression and correlation analysis, reliability, design of experiments, statistical process control, measurement systems analysis and simulation. Computer applications are emphasized.

    More Info: https://gapp.usc.edu/professional-programs/short-courses/industrial-systems/six-sigma-black-belt

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

    OutlookiCal
  • AI SEMINAR

    Fri, Feb 26, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Jie Xu, Assistant Professor at University of Miami

    Talk Title: Real time knowledge discovery and decision making

    Series: AI Seminar

    Abstract: As the world becomes ever more connected and instrumented, decision makers have ever more rapid access to ever changing and growing streams of data, but this makes the decision makers problems ever more complex as well, because it is impossible to learn everything in the time frame in which decisions must be made. What the decision maker must do, therefore, is to discover in real time what is relevant in the enormous stream of data and use the relevant information to make good decisions. This talk presents a systematic framework and associated algorithms that enable a decision maker to do this, and shows how to use them in real time traffic prediction as an application scenario. One key challenge in traffic prediction is how much to rely on prediction models that are constructed using historical data in real time traffic situations. Our decision framework learns from the current traffic situation in real time and predicts the future traffic by matching the current situation to the most effective prediction model. The algorithms we propose yield strong performance guarantees for both the long run and the short run. The applications are numerous besides traffic prediction, including patient monitoring, surveillance, social networks etc.

    Biography: Jie Xu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Miami. His research mainly focuses on game theory and learning theory. His interests lie in both developing the theory in these areas and applying it in real world engineering systems, including communication networks, cyber-security systems, online social platforms and healthcare informatics. Jie received his BS and MS degrees in Electronic Engineering from Tsinghua University in China in 2008 and 2010, respectively, and a PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2015. In 2014, he was with IBM T. J. Watson Research Center where he interned in the Clinical Stream Analytics team during the summer. Jie is a recipient of Distinguished PhD Dissertation Award at UCLA.

    Webcast will LIVE Broadcast ONLY (no recording):
    http://webcasterms1.isi.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=f1e4af9691fe4b2882a98b305b02458c1d
    Host: Emilio Ferrara

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th floor Large CR

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Alma Nava / Information Sciences Institute

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Sameer Singh (UMass Amherst)

    Mon, Feb 29, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Sameer Singh, UMass Amherst

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium

    Event details will be added closer to the date.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

    OutlookiCal
  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Feb 29, 2016 @ 12:30 PM - 01:49 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Stuart Ibsen, Postdoctoral fellow, Salk Institute

    Talk Title: TBA

    Biography: Stuart Ibsen received his undergraduate degree in Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. He went on to earn a Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Hawaii and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of California, San Diego. Stuart has 10 years of experience designing and building scientific instrumentation to use ultrasound to understand bioacoustic echolocation sonar sensory systems in dolphins and to explore biological phenomena in C. elegans and in cancer cell research. Stuart is also designing new drug delivery vehicles for chemotherapy applications

    Host: K. Kirk Shung, PhD

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

    OutlookiCal