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Events Calendar


Events for the 3rd week of April

  • PhD Defense - Ramin Moazeni

    Mon, Apr 14, 2014 @ 08:00 AM - 10:00 AM

    Computer Science

    University Calendar


    Title: Incremental Development Productivity Decline

    PhD Candidate: Ramin Moazeni

    Defense Committee: Barry Boehm (Chair), Aiichiro Nakano and Stanley Settles (Outside Member)

    Date: Monday, April 14, 2014

    Time: 8:00 AM

    Location: SAL 222

    Abstract:
    Software production is on the critical path of increasingly many program abilities to deliver effective operational capabilities. This is due to the number, complexity, independence, interdependence, and software‐intensiveness of their success‐critical components and interfaces. The estimation parameters and knowledge bases of current software estimation tools are generally good for stable, standalone, single increment development. However, they do not fully account for the degrees of program and software dynamism, incrementality, coordination, complexity, and integration. These phenomena tend to decrease software productivity relative to the cost model estimates made for the individual software components and for the overall systems, but it is difficult to estimate by how much.

    Incremental software development generally involves either adding, modifying, or deleting parts of the code in the previous increments. This means that if a useful system is to be built, the maintenance that will have to go into previous increments will take away productivity from the later ones.
    This research tests hypotheses about a phenomenon called Incremental Development Productivity Decline (IDPD) that may be more or less present in incremental software projects of various categories.

    Incremental models are now being used by many organizations in order to reduce development risks while trying to deliver releases of the product on time. It has become the most common method of software development with characteristics that influence the productivity of projects.

    Different ways of measuring productivity are presented and evaluated in order to come to a definition or set of definitions that is suitable to these categories of projects.

    Data from several sources has been collected and analyzed, and hypotheses tested about the degree of IDPD and its variation by increment and category. The results indicated the existence of an IDPD phenomenon, that its magnitude varies by application category, but that it tended to vary from increment to increment.

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 222

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Lizsl De Leon

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  • Pre-Engineering Information Session

    Mon, Apr 14, 2014 @ 12:30 PM - 01:30 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Current USC students interested in changing their major to engineering must attend a Pre-Engineering Information Session as part of the application process. At the session, we will review the application process, the change of major requirements, and important Viterbi programs and services.

    Students who attended the Viterbi Academic Expectations and Registration sessions during Orientation do not need to attend a Pre-Engineering workshop.

    For questions about the change of major process, please contact either Christine D’Arcy (cdarcy@usc.edu) or Jenny Vazquez-Akim (vazqueza@usc.edu).

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: Undergrad

    Posted By: Christine D'Arcy

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Apr 14, 2014 @ 11:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Tejal Desai, Professor, Department Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences UCSF School of Pharmacy

    Talk Title: Hierarchical Interfaces for Enhanced Therapeutic Delivery

    Abstract: Efficient drug delivery remains an important challenge in medicine. Control of the temporal, spatial, and kinetic profile of drug delivery as well as improved ease of administration leading to increased patient compliance are some of the unmet needs of current drug administration. Advancements in the microelectronics industry have led to the creation of new micro and nanofabrication methods which can be readily applied to biocompatible materials. These developments lay the groundwork for novel design possibilities that can be used for creating drug delivery devices with a high level of control at the cellular and molecular scale. In this talk, I will discuss how the combination of modular components and hierarchical length scales onto a single device can be useful for therapeutic delivery. Examples include nanoporous thin films to deliver protein therapeutics and nanostructured devices for epithelial drug delivery. By creating discrete micro and nanoscale features, one can begin to interact with cell and tissue surfaces in a manner previously unattainable. These subtle interactions can modulate properties such as tight junction permeability and fibrosis. By gaining a better understanding of how small scale topographies can influence the biological microenvironment, these structures can be harnessed directly for therapeutic use. Micro and nanostructured materials can add functionality to current drug delivery platforms while becoming an enabling technology leading to new basic discoveries in the pharmaceutical and biological sciences.

    Host: David D'Argenio

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Six Sigma Green Belt for Process Improvement

    Tue, Apr 15, 2014

    Professional Programs

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Talk Title: Six Sigma Green Belt for Process Improvement

    Abstract: Learn how to integrate principles of business, statistics and engineering to achieve tangible results. Master the use of Six Sigma to quantify the critical quality issues in your company. Once the issues have been quantified, statistics can be applied to provide probabilities of success and failure. Six Sigma methods increase productivity and enhance quality. As a Six Sigma green belt, you will be equipped to support and champion a Six Sigma implementation in your organization. To earn the Six Sigma Green Belt Certificate, you will be required to pass the Institute of Industrial Engineer's green belt exam (administered on the final day of the course).

    During this course you will have the opportunity to apply what you have learned to an actual issue you face in your organization. Prior seminar participants have reported significant savings from implementing their projects.

    *A financial services organization saw $128,000 in cost savings per quarter when they reduced transaction processing rework
    *A state agency reduced project cost over-runs by 28 percent
    *A transportation company saved more than $875,000 per year in turnover costs by improving the employee communications process
    *Reduced errors in a painting operation led to increased first pass acceptance and more than $197,000 in annual savings
    *A Web developer increased annual profits by 10 percent by cutting cycle time
    *A wave solder operation saw defects reduced by half and costs reduced by $60,000 per year


    Host: Professional Programs

    More Info: http://gapp.usc.edu/professional-programs/short-courses/industrial%2526systems/six-sigma-green-belt-process-improvement

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

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  • Second USC/VSoE Symposium on the Futures of Robotics

    Tue, Apr 15, 2014 @ 09:00 AM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Multiple, Multiple

    Talk Title: Second USC / VSoE Symposium on the Futures of Robotics

    Series: CS Symposium Series

    Abstract: The second USC Symposium on the Futures of Robotics will be held on the USC campus (Davidson Conference Center [DCC] Club Suite AB) on April 15, 2014. The academic community is cordially invited. No registration is necessary.

    The symposium is a day long set of talks by young- to mid-career roboticists breaking new ground in emerging areas in robotics and related fields.

    This event will be held on:

    Tuesday, April 15, 2014
    9:00am - 5:00pm

    Agenda

    08:30 - 09:00 Breakfast and Greetings

    09:00 - 09:10 Gaurav Sukhatme, Maja Matarić, Stefan Schaal, Nora Ayanian - Welcoming remarks

    09:15 - 09:50 Andrea Thomaz, Georgia Institute of Technology
    - "Social Robot Learning"

    09:55 - 10:30 Julie Shah, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    - "Integrating Robots into Team-Oriented Environments"

    10:35 - 10:50 Break

    10:55 - 11:30 Stephanie Gil, CSAIL, MIT
    - "Adaptive Communication Networks for Heterogeneous Teams of Robots"

    11:35 - 12:10 M. Ani Hsieh, Drexel University
    - "Control and Coordination of Robot Teams in Geophysical Flows: Exploiting the Environment for Prolonged Autonomy"

    12:15 - 13:30 Lunch - University Club [By Invitation Only]

    13:35 - 14:10 Cynthia Sung, CSAIL, MIT
    - "Geometric Design of Print-and-Fold Robots via Composition"

    14:15 - 14:50 Sonia Chernova, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
    - "Crowds and Robots: Enabling Robots to Learn from Everyday People"

    14:55 - 15:10 Break

    15:15 - 15:55 Brenna Argall, Northwestern University
    - "Turning Assistive Machines into Assistive Robots"

    15:55 - 16:30 Anca Dragan, Carnegie Mellon University
    - "A Mathematical Formalism for Legible Robot Motion"

    16:35 - 16:40 Walk to labs

    16:40 - 18:00 USC Robotics labs tours [Ronald Tutor Hall, 4th Floor]

    18:00 - 18:30 Travel to dinner

    18:30 - 22:00 Dinner (by Invitation only)
    Perch [448 S Hill St, Los Angeles, CA, 90013, 213-802-1770]

    Event Location

    The Davidson Continuing Education Conference Center
    University of Southern California, 3415 South Figueroa Street
    Los Angeles, CA 90089-0871
    Contact Us


    Jacob Beal
    Event Coordinator
    jbeal@usc.edu
    213-740-4498


    Biography: More details, lecture abstracts and biographies can be found at the dedicated page here.

    Host: Gaurav Sukhatme

    More Info: http://www.cs.usc.edu/research/2nd-usc-symposium-futures-of-robotics.htm

    More Information: ROBOTICS_Fullsheet.jpg

    Location: Charlotte S. & Davre R. Davidson Continuing Education Conference Center (DCC) - Club AB

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • CS Student Colloquium: Benjamin Ford - Adaptive Resource Allocation for Wildlife Protection against Illegal Poachers & Thanh H. Nguyen - Stop the Compartmentalization: Unified Robust Algorithms for Handling Uncertainties in Security Games

    Tue, Apr 15, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Benjamin Ford, Thanh H. Nguyen, USC CS

    Talk Title: Benjamin Ford - Adaptive Resource Allocation for Wildlife Protection against Illegal Poachers & Thanh H. Nguyen - Stop the Compartmentalization: Unified Robust Algorithms for Handling Uncertainties in Security Games

    Series: Student Seminar Series

    Abstract: Benjamin Ford - Adaptive Resource Allocation for Wildlife Protection against Illegal Poachers

    Abstract: Illegal poaching is an international problem that leads to the extinction of species and the destruction of ecosystems. As evidenced by dangerously dwindling populations of endangered species, existing anti-poaching mechanisms are insufficient. This paper introduces the Protection Assistant for Wildlife Security (PAWS) application - a joint deployment effort done with researchers at Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP) with the goal of improving wildlife ranger patrols. While previous works have deployed applications with a game-theoretic approach (specifically Stackelberg Games) for counter-terrorism, wildlife crime is an important domain that promotes a wide range of new deployments. Additionally, this domain presents new research challenges and opportunities related to learning behavioral models from collected poaching data. In addressing these challenges, our first contribution is a behavioral model extension that captures the heterogeneity of poachers’ decision making processes. Second, we provide a novel framework, PAWS-Learn, that incrementally improves the behavioral model of the poacher population with more data. Third, we develop a new algorithm, PAWS-Adapt, that adaptively improves the resource allocation strategy against the learned model of poachers. Fourth, we demonstrate PAWS’s potential effectiveness when applied to patrols in QENP, where PAWS will be deployed.

    Thanh H. Nguyen - Stop the Compartmentalization: Unified Robust Algorithms for Handling Uncertainties in Security Games

    Given the real-world applications of Stackelberg security games (SSGs), addressing uncertainties in these games is a major challenge. Unfortunately, we lack any unified computational framework for handling uncertainties in SSGs. Current state-of-the-art has provided only compartmentalized robust algorithms that handle uncertainty exclusively either in the defender’s strategy or in adversary’s payoff or in the adversary’s rationality, leading to potential failures in real-world scenarios where a defender often faces multiple types of uncertainties. Furthermore, insights for improving performance are not leveraged across the compartments, leading to significant losses in quality or efficiency. In this paper, we provide the following main contributions: 1) we present the first unified framework for handling the uncertainties explored in SSGs; 2) based on this unified framework, we propose the first set of “unified” robust algorithms to address combinations of these uncertainties; 3) we introduce approximate scalable robust algorithms for handling these uncertainties that leverage insights across compartments; 4) we present experiments demonstrating solution quality and runtime advantages of our algorithms.


    Host: CS PHD Committee

    Location: 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • CANCELLED - Vanir Construction Management, Inc. Information Session

    Tue, Apr 15, 2014 @ 05:00 PM - 07:15 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Services

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Please note, this information session has been cancelled.

    Informational Session - Area Manager and Project Manager will sharing information about Vanir Construction Management, specific projects, and career opportunities.

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Services

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  • Repeating EventMeet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, & Engineering Talk

    Wed, Apr 16, 2014

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Receptions & Special Events


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process; a student led walking tour of campus and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process and financial aid. Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m. Please visit https://esdweb.esd.usc.edu/unresrsvp/MeetUSC.aspx to check availability and make an appointment. Be sure to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - USC Admission Office

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

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    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Green Belt for Process Improvement

    Wed, Apr 16, 2014

    Professional Programs

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Talk Title: Six Sigma Green Belt for Process Improvement

    Abstract: This seminar, an introductory course in Six Sigma, will give you a thorough understanding of Six Sigma and its focus on eliminating defects through fundamental process knowledge. Topics covered in addition to DMAIIC and Six Sigma philosophy include basic statistics, statistical process control, process capability, financial implications and root cause analysis. This seminar is offered both in the classroom and online.

    Host: Professional Programs

    More Info: http://gapp.usc.edu/professional-programs/short-courses/industrial%2526systems/six-sigma-green-belt-process-improvement

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

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    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

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  • Computer Science General Faculty Meeting

    Wed, Apr 16, 2014 @ 12:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Computer Science General Faculty Meeting.

    Details emailed directly to attendees.

    RSVP link also to be provided.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 217

    Audiences: Invited Faculty Only

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • USC Credit Union Financial Fitness Seminar

    Wed, Apr 16, 2014 @ 12:00 PM - 01:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Services

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Graduating next month? You won't want to miss the USC Credit Union's Financial Fitness seminar. On Wednesday at noon in TCC 232, get advice, tips, and other useful information to help you transition through the next phase of your life.
    Topics discussed will include:
    1) Financial fitness: Avoiding Crisis (budgeting, job negotiation, first-time renters guide)
    2) In Too Deep: Student Loans and Repayment
    3) What is Credit and Why Do I Care?
    4) Stress-Free Car Buying
    5) First-Time Home Buying

    Complimentary lunch, refreshments, and giveaways will be provided. Space is limited.

    RSVP here https://campaigns3.documatix.com/events/event_form.aspx?e=8A51130848AA472

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - 232

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Services

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  • NL Seminar- The Mystery of the Tamam Shud Code

    Wed, Apr 16, 2014 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    University Calendar


    Abstract:
    One of the leading unsolved mysteries in Australia, is the case of the Somerton Man. This was a very athletically fit man found in a nice suit lying deceased on a beach in Australia in 1948. The mystery is that there was no mark on him and there was nothing to identify him. No one came forward to identify him either. Over 65 years later we still do not know his name or how he died. He had no ID, but his pocket had a piece of paper with the words "Tamam Shud" on it. It was subsequently found that the piece of paper had been torn out of a copy of a poetry book called the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. Penciled in the back of the book were letters that appeared to be some sort of code. Is this a clue? This talk will outline the key facts of mystery and show how forensic skills in engineering and computing are being used to attempt to both identify the man and shed light on the mysterious letters.

    Bio:
    Derek Abbott received a B.Sc. (Hons) in physics from Loughborough University, U.K. in 1982 and completed his Ph.D. in electrical and electronic engineering from the University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia, in 1995. From 1978 to 1986, he was a research engineer at the GEC Hirst Research Centre, London, U.K. From 1986–1987, he was a VLSI design engineer at Austek Microsystems, Australia. Since 1987, he has been with the University of Adelaide, where he is presently a full Professor with the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Prof. Abbott is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics (IOP) and a Fellow of the IEEE. He has won a number of awards including a Tall Poppy Award for Science (2004), a Premier’s Award in Science and Technology for outstanding contributions to South Australia (2004), and an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship (2012). He is on the editorial board of Proceedings of the IEEE. His interests are in complex systems and multidisciplinary applications of physics and engineering.

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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  • Repeating EventSix Sigma Green Belt for Process Improvement

    Thu, Apr 17, 2014

    Professional Programs

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Talk Title: Six Sigma Green Belt for Process Improvement

    Abstract: This seminar, an introductory course in Six Sigma, will give you a thorough understanding of Six Sigma and its focus on eliminating defects through fundamental process knowledge. Topics covered in addition to DMAIIC and Six Sigma philosophy include basic statistics, statistical process control, process capability, financial implications and root cause analysis. This seminar is offered both in the classroom and online.

    Host: Professional Programs

    More Info: http://gapp.usc.edu/professional-programs/short-courses/industrial%2526systems/six-sigma-green-belt-process-improvement

    Audiences: Registered Attendees

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    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

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  • PhD Defense - Yili Zhao

    Thu, Apr 17, 2014 @ 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    University Calendar



    PhD Candidate: Yili Zhao

    Comittee member:
    Jernej Barbic (Chair)
    Ulrich Neumann
    Igor Kukavica (Math Department)

    Location:
    SAL 322

    Time:
    10:00AM - 12:00PM


    Title:
    Plant Substructuring and Real-time Simulation Using Model Reduction

    Abstract:

    This research is focusing on real-time, physically-based simulation of plants undergoing large deformations. To achieve this goal, we first propose a novel algorithm based on model
    reduction and domain decomposition. It extends 3D nonlinear elasticity model reduction to open-loop multi-level reduced deformable structures. We decompose the input mesh into
    several domains, build a reduced deformable model for every domain, simulate each one separately, and connect domains using proper inertia coupling. This makes model reduction deformable simulations much more versatile: localized deformations can be supported without prohibitive computational costs, parts can be re-used and precomputation time can be shortened. Our method does not use constraints, and can handle large domain rigid body
    motion in addition to large deformations, due to our derivation of the gradient and Hessian of the rotation matrix in polar decomposition. We show real-time examples with multi-level
    domain hierarchies and thousands of reduced degrees of freedom.

    Then we design a pre-processor which takes a plant “polygon soup” triangle mesh as the only input and quickly pre-compute necessary data for the subsequent simulation. This tool breaks the ice for adoption of our multidomain dynamics simulator in practice. Our
    pre-processor is robust to non-manifold input geometry, gaps between branches or leaves, free-flying leaves not connected to any branch, small unimportant geometry (“debris”) left in
    the model, and plant self-collisions in the input configuration. Repeated copies (instances) of plant subparts such as leaves, petals or fruits can be automatically detected by our preprocessor. We enhanced our multidomain dynamics simulator to provide plant fracture, and inverse kinematics to easily pose plants. It can simulate complex plants at interactive rates, subjected to user forces, gravity or randomized wind. We simulated over 100 plants from diverse climates and geographic regions, including broadleaf (deciduous) trees and conifers,
    bushes and flowers. Our largest simulations involve anatomically realistic adult trees with hundreds of branches and over 100,000 leaves.

    Finally, we propose our future research in several directions including adding hierarchical instancing, collision detection and handling, etc.



    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 322

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Lizsl De Leon

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  • EE-Systems Seminar

    Thu, Apr 17, 2014 @ 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Wonsun Ahn , Postdoctoral Research Scientist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Talk Title: High-Performance JIT-Compiled Frameworks: Hardware/Compiler Co-Optimization

    Abstract: JIT-compiled frameworks are gaining increasing use for their cross-platform portability, performance portability, and runtime adaptability. In particular, scripting languages such as JavaScript, Python, and R are gaining wide acceptance. In these emerging frameworks, there is great opportunity for performance improvement through hardware/compiler co-optimization. In this talk, I present a few novel techniques that I have developed to improve performance.

    First, I show how the compiler can use Hardware Transactional Memory (HTM) support to enforce high-performance Sequential Consistency (SC) for programmability and security. The idea is to wrap large sections of code inside a transaction, and then optimize the code inside each transaction without concern for memory-consistency-model restrictions. The optimizations speculate that any violation of the memory model will not be seen by other threads; otherwise, the transaction is aborted. Using this approach, the compiler can even outperform current compilers by a significant margin by allowing optimization across synchronization boundaries.

    Next, I also show how the compiler can use the same HTM support to perform alias speculation. The approach consists of performing optimizations assuming the alias relationships that are true most of the time, and using the hardware to detect when such relationships are found not to hold through runtime checks. If the assumptions are correct, the code experiences good speedups; otherwise, the transaction is aborted.

    Lastly, I show a compiler enhancement for JavaScript. A key feature of scripting languages that gives them their flexibility is dynamic typing. However, the absence of declared types makes it very challenging for the compiler to generate efficient code. Advanced compilers cope with it by introducing type systems of their own behind the scenes, and maintaining the type of each object at runtime as metadata. In this work, I focus on the Google Chrome V8 JavaScript compiler, and show that its type system is too brittle. While it works well for applications that display static behavior, it causes type specialization to fail in real website code. I go on to modify V8's type system to match the more dynamic behavior of real websites, and show significant savings in execution time, energy, and memory consumption.

    Overall, these three approaches allow JIT compilers to achieve high performance while still maintaining programmability and security.


    Biography: Wonsun Ahn is a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests are parallel computer architecture and compilation systems. He is currently the co-PI of an NSF grant on improving the performance of scripting languages. He received a PhD in Computer Science from the same university in 2012. His PhD work was recognized by an IEEE Micro's Top Picks award publication. He has (co-)authored 12 journal and conference papers that have appeared in top compiler and architecture venues, and has two industry patents. He has served in the program and organizational committees of conferences, and is a member of the Samsung Frontier Membership.

    Host: Michel Dubois

    More Information: print_Ahn.pdf

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Estela Lopez

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  • USC DEN@Viterbi Limited Status Information Session

    Thu, Apr 17, 2014 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Distance Education Network

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Limited Status allows qualified individuals to begin taking classes via DEN@Viterbi before being formally admitted to a degree program. The Viterbi School uses a state-of-the-art, proprietary Web-based delivery system that enables students from around the world to access classes live, on demand or by download. To find out if you are eligible for this enrollment offering and to see how you can begin taking classes this spring, join us for this online information session.

    Click to RSVP

    Audiences: RSVP Required

    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

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  • Distinguished Lectures: Nanoengineering and Integration of Materials with Unique Functionalities Research Findings and Visions

    Thu, Apr 17, 2014 @ 12:45 PM - 01:50 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Haiyan Wang,

    Talk Title: Nanoengineering and Integration of Materials with Unique Functionalities Research Findings and Visions

    Series: Distinguished Lectures

    Host: Prof. Nutt

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Graduate

    Posted By: Ryan Choi

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  • Andrew J. Viterbi Distinguished Lecture in Communication

    Thu, Apr 17, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Professor Abbas El Gamal, Stanford University

    Talk Title: Common Information

    Series: Distinguished Lecturer Series

    Abstract: Entropy, introduced by Shannon in 1948, arises naturally as a universal measure of information in single-source compression, randomness extraction, and random number generation. In distributed systems, such as communication networks, multiprocessors, distributed storage, and sensor networks, there are multiple correlated sources to be processed jointly. The information that is common between these sources can be utilized, for example, to reduce the amount of communication needed for compression, computing, simulation, and secret key generation. My talk will focus on the question of how such common information should be measured.

    While our understanding of common information is far from complete, I will aim to demonstrate the richness of this question through the lens of network information theory. I will show that, depending on the distributed information processing task considered, there can be several well-motivated measures of common information. Along the way, I will present some of the key models, ideas, and tools of information theory, which invite further investigation into this intriguing subject.

    Some parts of this talk are based on recent joint work with Gowtham Kumar and Cheuk Ting Li and on discussions with Young-Han Kim.

    Biography: Abbas El Gamal is the Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering and Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1978. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC) from 1978 to 1980. His research interests and contributions have spanned the areas of information theory, wireless networks, CMOS imaging sensors and systems, and integrated circuit design and design automation. He has authored or coauthored over 200 papers and 30 patents in these areas. He is coauthor of the book Network Information Theory (Cambridge Press 2011). He has won several honors and awards, including the 2012 Claude E. Shannon Award, and the 2004 Infocom best paper award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the IEEE. He has been active in several IEEE societies, including serving on the Board on Governors of the IT society where he is currently its President. He cofounded and/or served in various leadership roles at several semiconductor, EDA, and biotechnology companies.

    Host: Professor Sandeep Gupta

    Location: Seeley Wintersmith Mudd Memorial Hall (of Philosophy) (MHP) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mayumi Thrasher

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  • International Student Assembly (ISA) workshop: Presentation, Interview and Networking Tips

    Thu, Apr 17, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 06:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Services

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Please join the International Student Assembly and the USC Career Center on Thursday April 17, 2014 from 4:00-6:00pm in TCC 227 (Rosen Family Screening Room) for a workshop concerning presentations, interviews, and networking tips. In the first part of the workshop, a prestigious Business Communication professor will go through academic presentations and the necessary skills international students need to understand in order to be confident during presentations. The second half will comprise of a USC Career Center counselor going over interview and networking skills, and applying those to international students.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - 227

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Services

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  • Wonderland Unbound

    Thu, Apr 17, 2014 @ 08:00 PM - 10:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    University Calendar


    RSVP TO: http://web-app.usc.edu/ws/eo2/calendar/113/event/903810

    Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, The Hunting of the Snark and other rare materials from the USC Libraries’ Cassady Lewis Carroll Collection will come to life in a multimedia event that will transform Doheny Memorial Library. In celebration of the tenth anniversary of the USC Libraries Wonderland Award, experience the joy of discovery in a wonderfully creative installation comprising digital animation, light projection and more.

    The Wonderland Unbound opening will be the culminating event of the tenth anniversary celebration of the USC Libraries Wonderland Award—a multidisciplinary competition in which students create scholarly and imaginative pieces inspired by the life and works of Lewis Carroll and the Cassady Lewis Carroll Collection.

    Organized by the USC Libraries.

    For further information on this event:
    visionsandvoices@usc.edu

    Location: Edward L. Doheny Jr. Memorial Library (DML) -

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Visions and Voices

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  • EE Seminar

    Fri, Apr 18, 2014 @ 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Yuan Xie, Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University

    Talk Title: Three-dimensional Integrated Circuits (3D ICs) Design, Architecture, and Applications

    Abstract: 3D Integration emerges as an attractive option to sustain Moore's law as well as to enable More-than-Moore. This talk will present an overview of recent research progress in 3D IC designs, including both design tools/VLSI perspective and architecture perspective. It will describe the following research directions for future 3D IC design: Design automation and test techniques and methodologies for 3D designs are imperative to realize 3D integration; Novel architectures and design space exploration at the architectural level are also essential to leverage 3D integration technologies for performance gain; Possible "killer" application for 3D integration (e.g., what application could dramatically benefit from 3D stacking technology or what novel applications are enabled by 3D technology.)

    Biography: Yuan Xie is currently a Professor in the Computer Science and Engineering department at the Pennsylvania State University. He received Ph.D. from Princeton University, and was with IBM Microelectronic before joining Penn State. He also helped establish and lead AMD Research China Lab. Prof. Xie is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Early Faculty (CAREER) award, the SRC Inventor Recognition Award, IBM Faculty Award, and several Best Paper Award and Best Paper Award Nominations at IEEE/ACM conferences. His research covers areas of EDA, computer architecture, VLSI circuit designs, and embedded systems. His current research projects include: three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs); emerging memory technologies; low power and thermal-aware design; reliable circuits and architectures; and embedded system synthesis.

    Host: Murali Annavaram

    More Information: Yuan Xie 04182014.pdf

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Estela Lopez

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  • AI Seminar- Virgil Griffith: Quantifying Synergy in Complex Systems

    Fri, Apr 18, 2014 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Virgil Griffith, PhD from the California Institute of a Technology

    Talk Title: Quantifying Synergy in Complex Systems

    Abstract: Synergy is a fundamental concept in complex systems that has received much attention in computational biology. One clear application of synergistic information is in computational genetics. It is well understood that most phenotypic traits are influenced not only by single genes but by interactions among genes—for example, human eye-color is cooperatively specified by more than a dozen genes. The magnitude of this “cooperative specification” is the synergistic information between the set of genes X and a phenotypic trait Y . Another application is neuronal firings where potentially thousands of presynaptic neurons influence the firing rate of a single post-synaptic (target) neuron. Yet another application is discovering the “informationally synergistic modules” within a complex system.

    Biography: Virgil Griffith is a newly minted PhD from the California Institute of a Technology. He is now works in Silicon Valley within the cryptocurrencies space.

    Home Page: http://virgil.gr


    Host: Greg Ver Steeg

    Webcast: http://webcasterms1.isi.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=77c09f802a064f5d8935e818a691815a1

    Location: ISI- Marina Del Rey-Conf Rm # 1135

    WebCast Link: http://webcasterms1.isi.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=77c09f802a064f5d8935e818a691815a1d

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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  • PhD Social Lunch

    Fri, Apr 18, 2014 @ 12:00 PM - 01:30 PM

    Computer Science

    Receptions & Special Events


    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 526

    Audiences: Department Only

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • The W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Colloquim

    Fri, Apr 18, 2014 @ 01:00 PM - 01:50 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Ken Cooper, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Talk Title: Pat-Down at a Distance: a Terahertz Eye for Personal Screening Applications

    Host: W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Program

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Christine Viterbi Admission & Student Affairs

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  • Integrated Systems Seminar Series - Spring 2014

    Fri, Apr 18, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Matthew Reynolds, University of Washington

    Talk Title: Wireless Beyond Wi-Fi

    Series: Integrated Systems Seminar Series

    Abstract: Wireless communication has already enabled the phenomenal growth of mobile computing. But what other impacts can Maxwell's four humble equations have on the world of computing? In this talk I will show some examples of how advances in the wireless world can change the way we think about computing through innovations in energy, communication, sensing, and imaging.

    One example is a tiny wireless backpack that enables neural and EMG telemetry from dragonflies in flight, with a 5 Mbps uplink, 1.2mW total power, and a weight of only 38 mg. The backpack is wirelessly powered and employs a modulated backscatter communication link that achieves an energy cost of only a few pJ/bit, over 100X lower power per bit than Wi-Fi. I will then present results that extend MIMO techniques from communication to wireless power transmission, to enhance long range wireless power delivery to mobile devices, and some results, recently reported in Science, on lensless compressive imaging at millimeter wavelengths.


    Biography: Matt Reynolds is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. He was previously the Nortel Networks Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University. He is also co-founder of the RFID systems firm ThingMagic Inc (acquired by Trimble Navigation), the energy conservation firm Zensi (acquired by Belkin), and the home sensing company SNUPI Inc.
    Matt's research interests include RFID, energy efficiency at the physical layer of wireless communication, and the physics of sensing and actuation. Matt received the Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab in 2003, where he was a Motorola Fellow, as well as S.B. and M.Eng. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE, has received five Best Paper awards, and has 13 issued and over 30 pending patents.


    Host: Hossien Hashemi, Mike Chen, Mahta Moghaddam, Sushil Subramanian

    More Info: http://mhi.usc.edu/activities/integrated-systems/

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Sushil Subramanian

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  • Astani CEE Ph.D. Seminar

    Fri, Apr 18, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Constantinos Sioutas, Professor, Astani CEE Department

    Talk Title: Physical, Chemical, And Toxicological Characteristics Of Particulate Matater (Pm) From Primary Sources And Secondary Formation Processes In The Megacity Of Los Angeles

    Abstract: Increasing epidemiological and toxicological evidence links cardio-respiratory health effects with exposures to ambient particulate matter (PM), and in particular to ultrafine nanoparticles (diameter < 0.15 µm). Emission inventories suggest that mobile sources may be primary direct contributors of these particles to urban atmospheres. Given the amount of traffic in the Los Angeles Basin, it is important to understand how particles from these sources behave after emission as they are transported away from busy roadways and other major sources, which are also abundant in all other urban areas in which over 50% of the earth’s population resides.

    This seminar will present a comprehensive summary of the research undertaken over the past almost decade by the Southern California Particle Center (SCPC) to investigate the sources, formation mechanisms, physical and chemical characteristics, population exposure patterns, and health effects of atmospheric particles with a particular emphasis on PM from mobile sources. This will be an overview of research described in greater detail in over 260 refereed publications, and used by federal (US EPA) and state (CARB) agencies to revise and promulgate new air quality PM standards.

    Utilizing mobile particle concentrators and other state-of-the-art technologies developed by the USC Aerosol lab, SCPC researchers set about characterizing the physical and chemical PM characteristics on/near freeways, in source and receptor areas of the Los Angeles Basin, the impact of mobile sources on indoor environments as well as ultrafine PM characteristics and emission factors of light-duty or heavy-duty vehicles. The seminar will present the most extensive physical and chemical characterization of air pollutants in the Los Angeles Basin (LAB) to have ever been conducted. Results from prospective human panel studies as well as mechanistic animal in vivo studies linking these atmospheric particles to a host of inflammatory airway responses, cardiovascular and neurological effects will be presented and discussed. In vitro toxicity evaluations of the relatively potency of these particles compared to manufactured nanoparticles in terms of their ability to induce oxidative stress effects, which lead to cardiovascular health effects, will also be presented.

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 102

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • Professor William H. Steier's Retirement Symposium

    Fri, Apr 18, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Receptions & Special Events


    Symposium honoring William H. Steier - 46 years in the Electrical Engineering Department. Speakers include: Dr. Larry Dalton - Emeritus Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Washington; Dr. Harold Fetterman - Emeritus Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA; Dr. Bahram Jalali - Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA; Dr. Alex K-Y. Jen - Chair, Department of Material Science & Engineering Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Washington; Dr. Lute Maleki - President & CEO, OEwaves.

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

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  • SWE Friends and Neighbors Day

    Sat, Apr 19, 2014

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Organizations

    University Calendar


    Come out and volunteer for Friends and Neighbors Day with SWE. We will be helping out the LA community by working on a service project. Please sign up to volunteer using this form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1vJMSaJuRRDrXjRlYeEzbuul6shARs54wFfVqCVskN5s/viewfor

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Society of Women Engineers Society of Women Engineers

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