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Events Calendar



Events for the 4th week of April

  • CS Colloquium: Joyce Ho (UT-Austin) - Extracting medically interpretable concepts from complex health data

    Mon, Apr 20, 2015 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Joyce Ho , UT-Austin

    Talk Title: Extracting medically interpretable concepts from complex health data

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Electronic health records (EHRs) are an increasingly important source of patient information. However, a major challenge is how to transform EHR into meaningful concepts so domain experts can act on the information in an appropriate manner. In this talk, I will discuss two approaches to extract concise, meaningful concepts from certain types of health datasets. First, I will describe a dynamic time series model that tracks a patient's cardiac arrest risk based on physiological measurements. Our algorithm is inspired by financial econometric and yields interpretability and predictability of a cardiac arrest event. Next, I will present sparse, nonnegative tensor factorization models to obtain multiple medical concepts with minimal human supervision. Tensor factorization utilizes information in the multiway structure to derive concise latent factors even with limited observations. Experimental results on real EHRs demonstrate the effectiveness of our models to extract medically interpretable concepts from complex health data.


    Biography: Joyce Ho is a PhD Candidate in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Texas at Austin co-advised by Dr. Joydeep Ghosh and Dr. Sriram Vishwanath. Her research involves the development of novel data mining and machine learning algorithms to address problems in healthcare. Joyce has also co-founded a healthcare data analytics company, Accordion Health, which was awarded an NSF Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant.


    Host: Prof. Yan Liu

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 322

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Seminar in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Apr 20, 2015 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Michael Anthony Bonaguidi, PhD, Assistant Professor of Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine

    Talk Title: Neural Stem Cells: New Tools Identify Dynamic Origins of Adult Brain Plasticity

    Abstract: The adult mammalian brain has the remarkable capability to undergo structural changes by adding newborn cells to selected existing circuitry. Understanding cellular origins and mechanistic regulation of this neural plasticity serves as a model of endogenous regenerative potential. We developed a noninvasive genetic strategy to reveal the basic properties of individual neural stem cells within the adult hippocampus and how neural circuitry couples their behavior with specific tissue demands. Recent computational and systems level approaches provide evidence for the co-existence of neural stem cells with distinct molecular and behavioral identity. A vision of how diverse stem cells adapt and repair the brain will be discussed.

    Biography: Biosketch
    Michael Bonaguidi, PhD, joined USC as an assistant professor in the Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in January 2015 and holds associate membership in the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute. He received his bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering from Marquette University, PhD in neuroscience from Northwestern University and completed his postdoctoral training at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering. His group investigates brain development, adaptation and aging with the overall goal of identifying and overcoming limits of neural regeneration. They provided evidence of individual stem cell existence within the adult brain. By developing a new visualization approach, they found that these stem cells spawn more stem cells, and form new neurons and critical supporting cells called astroglia. Their subsequent studies have linked adaptation of neural stem cell behavior to changes in the brain under normal conditions and during injury. These stem cells offer intriguing possibilities for treating a variety of conditions, including mood disorders, deficits in social adaptation and brain damage. He has published in high-impact journals such as Cell, Nature, Cell Stem Cell and Nature Neuroscience and received prestigious awards, most recently the NIH Pathway to Independence Fellowship.

    Research Impact:
    The Bonaguidi Laboratory investigates how stem cells act to adapt and repair the adult brain. Using endogenous neural stem cells as a model system, their approach incorporates principles from neuroscience, single cell molecular and cellular biology, computational and systems biology, imaging and engineering to unravel brain plasticity. The laboratory focuses on the reciprocal interaction between neural stem cells and their surroundings in normal, aging, injured and diseased states. The long-term goal is to evaluate the capacity of endogenous stem cells to serve as a cellular mediator of neural function and as a therapeutic source of cognitive rejuvenation.


    Host: Stanley Yamashiro

    Location: OHE 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Munich Graduate Information Session

    Mon, Apr 20, 2015 @ 07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Graduate Admission

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Students who have earned or are in the process of earning a Bachelor's degree in engineering, math, or a hard science (such as physics, biology, or chemistry) are welcome to attend to learn more about applying to our graduate programs.

    The session will include information on the following topics:

    Master's & Ph.D. programs in engineering
    How to Apply
    Scholarships and funding
    Student life at USC and in Los Angeles
    There will also be sufficient time for questions. Refreshments will be provided.

    Please contact us at viterbi.gradprograms@usc.edu if you have any inquiries about the event.

    In order to guarantee seating availability, we request completion of the online registration form using the Eventbrite links on the event page

    Audiences: Students with an undergraduate background in engineering, math or science

    Posted By: William Schwerin

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  • CS Colloquium: Yasin Abbasi-Yadkori (Queensland University of Technology) - Planning and Learning in Sequential Decision ProblemsPlanning and Learning in Sequential Decision Problems

    Tue, Apr 21, 2015 @ 09:45 AM - 10:50 AM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Yasin Abbasi-Yadkori, Queensland University of Technology

    Talk Title: Planning and Learning in Sequential Decision Problems

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Many decision problems have an interactive nature; the decision maker executes an action, receives feedback from the environment, and finally uses the feedback to improve the next decision. For instance, an Internet news recommendation system must make a recommendation based on the current visitor. The system then observes the click patterns of the visitor and can change its future recommendations. Such sequential decision problems are particularly challenging when the decision and state spaces are large, which is often the case in modern applications.

    In this talk, I will present my research in planning and learning in large sequential decision problems. I will consider three fundamental decision problems: problems with linear dynamics and quadratic losses (LQ problem); linear optimization with limited feedback (bandit problems); and policy optimization for large scale Markov decision processes. I will demonstrate a data-efficient adaptive controller and show the first finite-time performance guarantee for the LQ problem. For bandit problems, I will present an algorithm that can exploit sparsity in data. The improvement stems from the construction of smaller confidence sets. In particular, I will show the first sparsity confidence set for the linear regression problem. Finally, I will discuss convex optimization reductions for very general Markov decision (planning) problems. The reductions allow us to design computationally efficient algorithms that enjoy strong performance guarantees.


    Host: Fei Sha

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Epstein Institute / ISE 651 Seminar Series

    Tue, Apr 21, 2015 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Tinglong Dai, Assistant Professor of Operations Management, Carey Business School, Johns Hopkins University

    Talk Title: Contracting for On-Time Delivery in the U.S. Influenza Vaccine Supply Chain

    Series: Epstein Institute Seminar Series

    Abstract: Motivated by the influenza vaccine industry, we study a supply chain contracting problem in the presence of uncertainties surrounding product design, delivery, and demand. In the supply chain, a retailer places an order before a flu season starts and a manufacturer decides on when to produce vaccines. Because production after a design freeze can result in late deliveries and hence lost sales, the manufacturer in practice initiates production prior to the design freeze at its own risk. However, since it is the retailer who reaps most benefits from selling more vaccines delivered on time, the manufacturer has little incentive to undertake at-risk production, which in turn induces the retailer to reduce the order size in anticipation of lost sales; and this further discourages the manufacturer from making efforts to improve its delivery performance. We proceed to show that the Delivery-time-dependent Quantity Flexibility (D-QF) contract, a contract adopted in practice, may not coordinate the supply chain due to the tension between overcoming double marginalization and incentivizing early production; another contract used in practice, the Late-Rebate (LR) contract, nearly coordinates the supply chain when demand uncertainty is low. We propose a Buyback-and-Late-Rebate (BLR) contract that combines buyback with rebate for late deliveries and can both coordinate the supply chain and provide flexibility of profit division. Our numerical analysis suggests that the total supply chain profits can be improved by over 10%, on average, compared with the contracts currently used in this industry.


    Biography: Tinglong Dai is an Assistant Professor of Operations Management at Carey Business School of the Johns Hopkins University. He received a Ph.D. in Operations Management / Robotics (2013), jointly offered by Tepper School of Business and the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University, with a dissertation entitled "Incentives in U.S. Healthcare Operations.” He also received an M.S. in Industrial Administration from Carnegie Mellon in 2009, an M.Phil. in Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2006, and a B.Eng. in Automation from Tongji University in 2004.

    Dr. Dai is the recipient of the 2012 POMS Best Paper in Healthcare Award, the 2012 INFORMS Pierskalla Runner Up Award for the Best Paper in Healthcare, and 2nd Place Award in the 2012 INFORMS Case and Teaching Materials Competition. He is a finalist in the 2014 Elwood S. Buffa Doctoral Dissertation Award, and the 2013 POMS College of Supply Chain Management Best Student Paper Competition. His research has been published in leading journals such as Management Science. He has been quoted in MedPageToday.com, Baltimore Sun, and Maryland Daily Record.

    His research areas include Healthcare Operations, Healthcare Supply Chain, Marketing-Operations Interfaces, Strategic Queueing Design, and Distributed Optimization.



    Host: Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    More Information: Seminar-Tinglong Dai.docx

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Georgia Lum

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  • ITP Game Industry Career Night

    Tue, Apr 21, 2015 @ 07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Workshops & Infosessions


    You are invited to attend the ITP Game Industry Career Night! This event will feature a panel of highly accomplished professionals from the video game industry who are excited to answer your questions and share valuable career advice. Past speakers have come from companies such as Sega, Atari, Activision, Treyarch, Disney, Sony, Naughty Dog, and Electronic Arts.

    When: Tuesday, April 21st at 7:00-8:30 pm
    Where: RTH 211
    All students interested in learning about a career in the video game industry are welcome!

    Topics will include:
    -How to get into the video game industry
    -Past professional projects
    -Job application process
    -Potential career path options

    Come listen and network with video game professionals! Pizza will be provided!

    For questions, feel free to contact the ITP Advising office at itpadvising@usc.edu.

    More Information: VideoGameIndustryNight flyer.pdf

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: Undergrad

    Posted By: Alexandra Garabedian

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  • Health, Technology and Engineering Information Session

    Wed, Apr 22, 2015 @ 09:00 AM - 10:00 AM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Doctoral Programs

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Graduate students are invited to learn more about the Health, Technology and Engineering (HTE) Graduate Certificate program during an information session.

    RSVP requested via http://gapp.usc.edu/events/health-technology-and-engineering-information-session

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 120

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Jennifer Gerson

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  • Computer Science Faculty Meeting - EEB 248

    Wed, Apr 22, 2015 @ 12:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Event details will be emailed to invited attendees.

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Invited Faculty Only

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • PhD Defense - Randolph Voorhies

    Wed, Apr 22, 2015 @ 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Computer Science

    University Calendar


    PhD Candidate: Randolph Voorhies

    Date: 4/22
    Time: 2-4pm
    Location: HNB 100

    Committee:
    Laurent Itti (Chair)
    Gaurav Sukhmate
    James Weiland


    Title:
    Efficient SLAM For Scanning LiDAR Sensors Using Combined Plane and Point Features

    Abstract:
    This work presents a novel SLAM algorithm for scanning (Velodyne style) LiDAR sensors. A Hough transform algorithm is first derived which exploits the unique geometry of these sensors to detect planar features, and it is then shown how these features can be matched over a sequence of scans to reconstruct the path of the sensor. A mathematical framework is then developed to track how well constrained these sequential alignment problems are, and to detect when they become under-constrained. A method is then presented which determines a minimal set of non-planar features to be extracted from scenes to achieve full constraint within this framework. Finally, all of these tools are combined into an online SLAM system which is able to close the loop on a variety of indoor and outdoor datasets without the use of odometry, GPS, or an IMU. Both the frame to frame alignment as well as the SLAM algorithms are compared to state of the art methods and superior performance is shown for both.

    Location: Hedco Neurosciences Building (HNB) - 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Lizsl De Leon

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  • Communications, Networks & Systems (CommNetS) Seminar

    Wed, Apr 22, 2015 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Sanjay Lall, Stanford University

    Talk Title: Sufficient Statistics for Multi-Agent Decision

    Series: CommNetS

    Abstract: We describe a notion of sufficient statistics for decision, estimation or control problems involving multiple players. As in the classical single-player setting, sufficient statistics contain all of the information necessary for the players to make optimal decisions. In the multi-agent setting, we construct such sufficient statistics via a convex relaxation of the feasible set of the corresponding decision problem. We show that these statistics may be updated recursively, and may be constructed by appropriately composing the corresponding single-player statistics. We present algorithms for this construction when the information pattern is defined by an appropriate graph.

    Biography: Sanjay Lall is Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Previously he was a Research Fellow at the California Institute of Technology in the Department of Control and Dynamical Systems, and prior to that he was NATO Research Fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems. He was also a visiting scholar at Lund Institute of Technology in the Department of Automatic Control.
    He received the Ph.D. in Engineering and B.A. in Mathematics from the University of Cambridge, England. Professor Lall's research focuses on the development of advanced engineering methodologies for the design of control systems, and his work addresses problems including decentralized control and model reduction. Professor Lall received the O. Hugo Schuck Best Paper Award at the American Control Conference in 2013, the George S. Axelby Outstanding Paper Award by the IEEE Control Systems Society in 2007, the NSF Career award in 2007, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) in 2007, and the Graduate Service Recognition Award from Stanford University in 2005. With his students, he received the best student paper award at the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control in 2005 and the best student paper award at the IEEE International Conference on Power Systems Technology (POWERCON) in 2012.


    Host: Prof. Ashutosh Nayyar

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Apr 22, 2015 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Patrick D. Weidman, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder

    Talk Title: Mathematical Models for the Shape of the Eiffel Tower

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Abstract: Equations modeling the shape of the Eiffel Tower are investigated. One model, based on equilibrium of moments, gives the wrong tower curvature. A second model, based on constancy of vertical axial stress, does provide a fair approximation to the tower's skyline profile of twenty-nine contiguous panels. However, neither model can be traced back to Eiffel's writings. Reported here is a new model embodying Eiffel's concern for wind loads on the tower, as documented in his communication to the French Civil Engineering Society on March 30, 1885. The result is a nonlinear, integro-differential equation which may be solved to yield an exponential profile. An analysis of actual panel coordinates reveals a profile closely approximated by two piece-wise continuous exponentials with different growth rates. This is explained by specific safety factors for wind loading that Eiffel & Company incorporated in the design and construction of the free-standing tower.

    Host: Paul Ronney

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • VSi2: Learn About Challenges and Opportunities in Financial Tech.

    Wed, Apr 22, 2015 @ 05:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    University Calendar


    RSVP Here

    Ryan joined Bank of America Merrill Lynch in 2010 as Senior Vice President of the Technology Partnership Development. In his role, Ryan is responsible for leveraging the technology organization's expertise, insights and relationships for client business development efforts with Investment Banking and Institutional Equities. In addition, Ryan focuses on strategic partnerships with technology companies and the venture capital community.

    Prior to joining Bank of America, Ryan spent eleven years working in the technology sector – first as a sell-side software analyst at Morgan Stanley, then in corporate strategy and marketing roles at Oracle and SAP. As a research analyst at Morgan Stanley, Ryan was part of the number-one ranked enterprise software research team in Institutional Investor’s All-America rankings from 1999 to 2003. Following Morgan Stanley, Ryan was Vice President of Business Strategy at Oracle Corporation, where he reported directly to President Charles Phillips and was responsible for strategic research that supported the Executive Committee and the Board of Directors. In 2007, Ryan retuned to Morgan Stanley where he was a Vice President in the Institutional Equities Division. Most recently, Ryan was Head of Planning and Strategy for the Global Field Marketing organization at SAP.

    Location: Kerckhoff Hall (KER) -

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Viterbi Student Innovation Institute

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  • CS Colloquium: Mark Zhandry (Stanford) - The Surprising Power of Modern Cryptography

    Thu, Apr 23, 2015 @ 09:45 AM - 10:50 AM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Mark Zhandry, Stanford

    Talk Title: The Surprising Power of Modern Cryptography

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Modern cryptography is surprisingly powerful, yielding capabilities such as secure multiparty computation, computing on encrypted data, and hiding secrets in code. Currently, however, some of these advanced abilities are still too inefficient for practical use. The goals of my research are two-fold: (1) continue expanding the capabilities of cryptography and its applications, and (2) bring these advanced capabilities closer to practice.

    In this talk, I will focus on a particular contribution that addresses both of these objectives: establishing a shared secret key among a group of participants with only a single round of interaction. The first such protocols required a setup phase, where a central authority determines the parameters for the scheme; unfortunately, this authority can learn the shared group key and must therefore be trusted. I will discuss how to remove this setup phase using program obfuscation, though the scheme is very impractical due to the inefficiencies of current obfuscators. I will then describe a new technical tool called witness pseudorandom functions and show how to use this tool in place of obfuscation, resulting in a significantly more efficient protocol.


    Biography: Mark Zhandry is a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University advised by Dan Boneh. He studies cryptography and computer science theory and is currently focusing on developing new cutting-edge cryptographic capabilities and improving the efficiency of these applications. He is visiting Microsoft Research New England and MIT for the 2014-15 academic year.

    Host: Computer Science Department

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Distinguished Lecture: Teri Odom (Northwestern)

    Thu, Apr 23, 2015 @ 12:45 PM - 02:00 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Teri Odom, Northwestern, Materials Science & Engineering

    Talk Title: Light-Matter Interactions in Plasmonic Nanocavities

    Series: Distinguished Lectures

    Abstract: TBA

    Host: Prof. Armani

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Ryan Choi

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  • CS Student Colloquium Series

    Thu, Apr 23, 2015 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: TBA, USC Computer Science

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: Student Seminar Series

    Abstract: Coming soon.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Astronautical Engineering Seminar

    Fri, Apr 24, 2015 @ 09:30 AM - 10:30 AM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Mehran Mesbahi, University of Washington

    Talk Title: Networked Systems: Influence Geometry, Compositional Algebra, and Distributed Learning with Applications in Autonomous and Distributed Systems

    Abstract: Prof. Mesbahi will explore a class of results at the interaction of systems and control, optimization, and
    theory of networks that hint at the emergence of an exciting sub-discipline in system theory. In particular,
    he will discuss a compositional system theory for network-of-networks, controllability properties of
    diffusively coupled networks in terms of their symmetry and distributed learning and adaptation on
    dynamic networks. Along the way, examples and motivations for studying such systems in the context of
    human-swarm interaction as well as distributed autonomous and semi-autonomous networks will be
    discussed.

    Biography: Mehran Mesbahi received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from USC in 1996. He was a member of the
    Guidance, Navigation, and Analysis group at JPL from 1996-2000 and an Assistant Professor of
    Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics at the University of Minnesota from 2000-2002. He is currently a
    Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Adjunct Professor of Mathematics, and Executive Director of
    Joint Center for Aerospace Technology Innovation at the University of Washington. He was the recipient
    of the NSF CAREER Award in 2001, NASA Space Act Award in 2004, UW Distinguished Teaching
    Award in 2005, and UW College of Engineering Innovator Award in 2008. His research interest is
    autonomous and networked aerospace systems.

    Host: Dan Erwin

    More Information: MesbahiSeminar-2015-04-24.pdf

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Dan Erwin

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  • Enery informatics distinguished seminar

    Fri, Apr 24, 2015 @ 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Christos Faloutsos, Carnegie Mellon University

    Talk Title: Large Graph Mining: Patterns, Cascades, Fraud Detection, and Algorithms

    Series: Energy Informatics Distinguished Seminar Series

    Abstract: Given a large graph, like who-calls-whom, or who-likes-whom, what behavior is normal and what should be surprising, possibly due to fraudulent activity? How do graphs evolve over time? How does influence/news/viruses propagate, over time? We focus on three topics: (a) anomaly detection in large static graphs (b) patterns and anomalies in large time-evolving graphs and (c) cascades and immunization.
    For the first, we present a list of static and temporal laws, including advances patterns like 'eigenspokes'; we show how to use them to spot suspicious activities, in on-line buyer-and-seller settings, in FaceBook, in twitter-like networks. For the second, we show how to handle time-evolving graphs as tensors, how to handle large tensors in map-reduce environments, as well as some discoveries such settings.
    For the third, we show that for virus propagation, a single number is enough to characterize the connectivity of graph, and thus we show how to do efficient immunization for almost any type of virus (SIS - no immunity; SIR - lifetime immunity; etc)
    We conclude with some open research questions for graph mining.

    Biography: Christos Faloutsos is a Professor at Carnegie Mellon University. He has received the Presidential Young Investigator Award by the National Science Foundation (1989), the Research Contributions Award in ICDM 2006, the SIGKDD Innovations Award (2010), twenty "best paper" awards (including two "test of time" awards), and four teaching awards. Five of his advisees have attracted KDD or SCS dissertation awards. He is an ACM Fellow, he has served as a member of the executive committee of SIGKDD; he has published over 300 refereed articles, 17 book chapters and two monographs. He holds eight patents and he has given over 35 tutorials and over 15 invited distinguished lectures. His research interests include data mining for graphs and streams, fractals, database performance, and indexing for multimedia and bio-informatics data.

    Host: Prof. Viktor Prasanna and Dr. Charalompos Chelmis

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Colloquium

    Fri, Apr 24, 2015 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Marc E. Hankin, Hankin Patent Law

    Talk Title: Patent Law with a STEM Background

    Host: W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Program

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Jeffrey Teng

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  • Munushian Seminar

    Fri, Apr 24, 2015 @ 02:00 PM - 03:29 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Charles Sodini, LeBel Professor EECS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Talk Title: Revolutionizing Medical Device Design

    Abstract: The vision of the MIT Medical Electronic Device Realization Center (MEDRC) is to revolutionize medical diagnostics and treatments by bringing health care directly to the individual and to create enabling technology for the future information-driven healthcare system. This vision will in turn transform the medical electronic device industry. Specific areas that show promise are wearable or minimally invasive monitoring devices, medical imaging, portable laboratory instrumentation, and the data communication from these devices and instruments to healthcare providers and caregivers.
    Rapid innovation in miniaturization, mobility, and connectivity will revolutionize medical diagnostics and treatments, bringing health care directly to the individual. Continuous monitoring of physiological markers will place capability for the early detection and prevention of disease in the hands of the consumer, shifting to a paradigm of maintaining wellness rather than treating sickness. Just as the personal computer revolution has brought computation to the individual, this revolution in personal medicine will bring the hospital lab and the physician to the home, to emerging countries, and to emergency situations. These system solutions containing state-of-the-art sensors, electronics, and computation will radically change our approach to health care. This new generation of medical systems holds the promise of delivering better quality health care while reducing medical costs.
    In this talk I will introduce the research directions of the MEDRC and discuss the circuit and system design issues and clinical measurements from selected MEDRC projects highlighting wearable monitoring.

    Biography: Charles G. Sodini received the B.S.E.E. degree from Purdue University, in 1974, and the M.S.E.E. and the Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1981 and 1982, respectively.
    He was a member of the technical staff at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories from 1974 to 1982, where he worked on the design of MOS memory. He joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in 1983, where he is currently the LeBel Professor of Electrical Engineering. His research interests are focused on medical electronic systems for monitoring and imaging. These systems require state-of-the-art mixed signal integrated circuit and systems with extremely low energy dissipation. He is the co-founder of the Medical Electronic Device Realization Center at MIT.
    Along with Prof. Roger T. Howe, he is a co-author of an undergraduate text on integrated circuits and devices entitled “Microelectronics: An Integrated Approach.” He also studied the Hong Kong/South China electronics industry in 1996-97 and has continued to study the globalization of the electronics industry.
    Dr. Sodini was a co-founder of SMaL Camera Technologies a leader in imaging technology for consumer digital still cameras and machine vision cameras for automotive applications. He has served on a variety of IEEE Conference Committees, including the International Electron Device Meeting where he was the 1989 General Chairman. He has served on the IEEE Electron Device Society Administrative Committee, was president of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society from 2002-2004 and was the Chair of the Executive Committee for the VLSI Symposium from 2006-2014. He serves on a variety of industry boards and is a Fellow of the IEEE.

    Host: EE-Electrophysics

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

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  • Viterbi Best Dissertation Award Symposium

    Fri, Apr 24, 2015 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Doctoral Programs

    Receptions & Special Events


    Viterbi Ph.D. students, faculty and staff are invited to attend the 1st annual Viterbi School of Engineering Best Dissertation Award Symposium. Three graduating Ph.D. students will present their research for a chance to win the William J. Ballhaus, Jr. Prize for Excellence in Graduate Engineering Research. The winner will be recognized at the Viterbi School of Engineering Ph.D. Hooding and Awards Ceremony on May 14, 2015.

    Nominations for the William J. Ballhaus, Jr. Prize for Excellence in Graduate Engineering Research will be accepted by departments only.

    RSVP requested via https://gapp.usc.edu/events/viterbi-best-dissertation-award-symposium by April 22.

    Any questions may be directed to Jennifer Gerson, Director of Doctoral Programs, at jgerson@usc.edu.

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 124

    Audiences: Ph.D. Students, Faculty and Staff

    Posted By: Jennifer Gerson

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Fri, Apr 24, 2015 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Mohammadhassan Mohegh and Haeng Sik Ko, Astani CEE Ph.D. Candidates

    Talk Title: TBA

    Abstract: TBA

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • NL Seminar-Learning To Simplify Text One Sentence at a Time

    Fri, Apr 24, 2015 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: David Kauchak , Pomona College

    Talk Title: Learning To Simplify Text One Sentence at a Time

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: Information can now be found on almost any topic ranging from news to do-it-yourself guides to health-related articles. Unfortunately for readers, the complexity and readability of these texts can vary widely. Even if the concepts of an article are accessible, the language and structure of the text can prohibit a person from understanding these concepts.

    Text simplification techniques are aimed at reducing the reading and grammatical complexity of text while retaining the meaning and are one approach to increasing information accessibility. Motivated by both corpus analyses and human experiments, I will introduce a number of recent text simplification techniques ranging from semi-automated approaches, that require a human in the loop, to automated approaches, including word-level, phrase-level and syntax-level models.



    Biography: David Kauchak is currently an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department at Pomona College. Previously, he was at Middlebury College and has worked at Google, ISI, PARC and Adchemy. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from University of California, San Diego.

    Host: Nima Pourdamghani and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr. Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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