Logo: University of Southern California

Events Calendar


Events for the 4th week of April

  • New Solutions for High-Level Synthesis

    Mon, Apr 21, 2014 @ 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Deming Chen, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Talk Title: New Solutions for High-Level Synthesis

    Abstract: While technology scaling has presented many new and exciting opportunities, new design challenges have arisen due to increased density and stringent delay and power constraints for VLSI circuits. A significant problem is the growing gap between rapidly increasing silicon capacity and the design productivity that lags behind. High-level synthesis (HLS) has been touted as a solution to this problem, as it can significantly reduce the number of man hours required for a design by raising the level of design abstraction. However, existing HLS solutions have several limitations, and studies show that the design quality of HLS can be noticeably worse than that of manual RTL design. In this talk, I will present several new techniques we developed to drastically improve HLS solutions. These include design entry with parallel languages, smart design space exploration, logic/high-level co-optimization, automatic iterative improvement, and communication optimization across multiple modules, etc. Meanwhile, powerful source-to-source compilation and polyhedral model-based code analysis and transformation are used to enable effective realization of some of these techniques. For example, our code transformation and optimization using polyhedral model can enable data streaming across two communicating hardware modules through HLS, which achieved 30X execution speedup over the baseline on average. At the end of the talk, I will also briefly introduce other on-going research activities in my lab in the areas of GPU computing, nanotechnology, and computational genomics.

    Biography: Deming Chen is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from University of California at Los Angeles in 2005. His research interests include system- and high-level synthesis, compilation and programming for heterogeneous platforms, nano-systems design, GPU optimization, and bioinformatics. He is a technical committee member for a series of conferences, including FPGA, ASPDAC, ICCD, ISQED, DAC, ICCAD, DATE, ISLPED, FPL, etc. He is or has been an associated editor for TCAD, TVLSI, TODAES, TCAS-I, JCSC, and JOLPE. He is the program chair and general chair for several conferences. He received five Best Paper Awards, the NSF CAREER Award in 2008, the ACM SIGDA Outstanding New Faculty Award in 2010, and IBM Faculty Award in 2014. He is a senior member of IEEE. He was involved in two startup companies. He implemented his published algorithm on CPLD technology mapping when he was a software engineer in Aplus Design Technologies, Inc. in 2001, and the software was exclusively licensed by Altera. He is one of the inventors of the xPilot high-level synthesis package developed at UCLA, which was licensed to AutoESL Design Technologies, Inc.

    Host: Massoud Pedram

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Apr 21, 2014 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Bo Han, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Research Departments of Surgery and Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California

    Talk Title: Microenvironment in Tissue Engineering

    Host: David D'Argenio

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • A Computational Framework for Diversity in Ensembles of Humans and Machine Systems

    Mon, Apr 21, 2014 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Kartik Audhkhasi, University of Southern California

    Talk Title: A Computational Framework for Diversity in Ensembles of Humans and Machine Systems

    Abstract: My Ph.D. thesis presents a computational framework for diversity in ensembles or collections of humans and machine systems used for signal and information processing. Machine system ensembles have out-performed single systems across many pattern recognition tasks ranging from automatic speech recognition to online recommendation. Likewise, ensembles are central to computing with humans, for example, in crowd sourcing-based data tagging and annotation in human behavioral signal processing. This widespread use of ensembles, albeit largely heuristic, is motivated by their robustness to the ambiguity in production, representation, and processing of real-world information. Diversity or complementarity of the individual humans and machine systems is widely-accepted as a key ingredient in ensemble design. I will present a computational framework for this diversity by addressing three important problems - modeling, analysis, and design.

    I will first propose the Globally-Variant Locally-Constant (GVLC) model for the labeling behavior of a diverse ensemble. The GVLC model captures the data-dependent reliability and diverse behavior of an ensemble through a latent state-dependent noisy channel. I will next present the Generalized Ambiguity Decomposition (GAD) theorem that defines ensemble diversity for a broad class of statistical learning loss functions and relates this diversity to ensemble performance. I will show an application of the GAD theorem by theoretically and empirically linking the diversity of an automatic speech recognition system ensemble with the word error rate of the fused hypothesis. The final part of my thesis will present techniques to design a diverse ensemble of machine systems, ranging from maximum entropy models to sequence classifiers. I will also prove that introducing diversity in the training data through careful noise addition speeds-up the maximum likelihood training of Restricted Boltzmann Machines and feed-forward neural networks.

    Biography: Kartik Audhkhasi received the B.Tech. degree in Electrical Engineering and the M.Tech. degree in Information and Communication Technology from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi. He is currently an Electrical Engineering Ph.D. candidate at the University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles. His research focuses on a computational framework for diversity in ensembles of humans and machine systems for signal and information processing. He is broadly interested in statistical signal processing, speech processing and recognition, machine learning, and human-centered computing.
    He is a recipient of the Annenberg fellowship, the IBM Ph.D. fellowship, and was a 2012 USC Ming Hsieh Institute Ph.D. Scholar. Kartik was part of the USC team that won the Interspeech-2013 Computational Paralinguistics Challenge. He has also received best paper and best teaching assistant awards from the Electrical Engineering Department at USC.


    Host: Prof. Shrikanth S. Narayanan

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 320

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia Veal

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  • Brain MRI Statistical Feature Extraction for Characterizing Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Tue, Apr 22, 2014 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Norbert Schuff, Ph.D., Dept. of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco

    Talk Title: Brain MRI Statistical Feature Extraction for Characterizing Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Series: Medical Imaging Seminar Series

    Abstract: Brain lesions from neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, are difficult to detect on MRI with the naked eye. This may explain why MRI is not yet used as a diagnostic tool for these conditions - except for ruling out other major brain diseases. It is therefore important to find effective solutions for the extraction of imaging features that can be used for diagnosing neurodegenerative diseases. I will discuss new approaches mainly anchored in information theory for extracting features from structural as well as functional brain MRI data. In particular, I will show new approaches for quantifying complexity of resting-state fMRI. Lastly, I will present initial results from MRI vascular fingerprinting - an approach for studying brain microvasculature.



    Biography: I am a Professor in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at the University of California, San Francisco. I am also Co-Director of the Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Interest Group and a researcher at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. I earned my PhD in Physics from the Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg in 1983. From 1984 to 1992, I developed NMR & MRI systems first with Bruker GmbH in Karlsruhe/Germany and later with Varian, Palo Alto, California. In 1993, I joined UCSF.

    I study neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson using MRI. My interest is to better capture abnormal brain structure and function for improving prediction, diagnosis and monitoring progression of these devastating conditions. I accomplish this by developing new methods for extracting image features using MRI physics as well as modern concepts of probability, statistical learning and information theory.


    Host: Prof. Justin Haldar

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia Veal

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  • Epstein Institute / ISE 651 Seminar Series

    Tue, Apr 22, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Meisam Razaviyayn, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota

    Talk Title: "Successive Convex Approximation: A Unified Analysis and Applications in Big Data"

    Abstract: The (randomized) block coordinate descent (BCD) method is widely used for minimizing a continuous function of several block variables. At each iteration of this method, a single block of variables is optimized, while the remaining variables are held fixed. Unfortunately, the requirement for BCD convergence is often too restrictive for many practical scenarios. In this talk, we study an alternative inexact BCD approach which updates the variable blocks by successively minimizing a sequence of approximations which are either locally tight upper bounds for the objective or strictly convex local approximations. The main contributions of this work include the characterizations of the convergence conditions for a fairly wide class of such methods, especially for the cases where the objective functions are either non-differentiable or nonconvex. Our results unify and extend the existing convergence results for many classical algorithms such as the BCD method, the difference of convex functions (DC) method, the expectation maximization(EM) algorithm, as well as the block forward-backward splitting algorithm, all of which are popular for large scale optimization problems involving big data. At the end of the talk, we will see applications of this framework in tensor decomposition, dictionary learning for image processing, and beamformer design for wireless communications.

    TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 2014
    VON KLEINSMID CENTER (VKC) ROOM 100
    3:30 - 4:50 PM

    Biography: Meisam Razaviyayn is a visiting PhD student at Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at University of Southern California. He received his undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from Isfahan University of Technology in 2008. He obtained his M.S. in Mathematics and Electrical Engineering from University of Minnesota. Now he is in the last year of his PhD, advised by Professor Tom Luo at the university of Minnesota. Meisam received different awards and fellowships such as University of Minnesota Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Fellowship, Fifth Place in ACM International Programming Regional Contest, and Iran national mathematics Olympiad silver medal. He has also been among the finalist of the best paper prize for young researcher in continuous optimization, ICCOPT 2013, and the finalist for the best student paper award, SPAWC 2010. Meisam's research interests include large scale optimization, machine learning, computational issues in wireless data communication, and statistical signal processing.

    Host: Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    More Information: Seminar-Razaviyayn.doc

    Location: Von Kleinsmid Center For International & Public Affairs (VKC) - Room 100

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Georgia Lum

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  • CS Colloquium: Amir Houmansadr (UTexas - Austin) - The Cyberspace Battle for Information: Combating Internet Censorship

    Tue, Apr 22, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Amir Houmansadr, UTexas - Austin

    Talk Title: The Cyberspace Battle for Information: Combating Internet Censorship

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: The lecture will be available to stream from your browser here.

    The Internet has become ubiquitous, bringing many benefits to people across the globe. Unfortunately, Internet users face threats to their security and privacy: repressive regimes deprive them of freedom of speech and open access to information, governments and corporations monitor their online behavior, advertisers collect and sell their private data, and cybercriminals hurt them financially through security breaches.

    My research aims to make Internet communications more secure and privacy-preserving. In this talk, I will focus on the design, implementation, and analysis of tools that help users bypass Internet censorship. I will discuss the major challenges in building robust censorship circumvention tools, introduce two novel classes of systems that we have developed to overcome these challenges, and conclude with several directions for future research.

    Biography: Amir Houmansadr is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in August 2012. Amir’s research revolves around various network security and privacy problems, including Internet censorship circumvention, network traffic analysis, and anonymous communications. He has received several awards for his research, including the Best Practical Paper Award at the IEEE Symposium on Security & Privacy (Oakland) 2013.

    Host: Ethan Katz-Bassett

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • CS Colloquium: Amir Houmansadr (UTexas - Austin) - The Cyberspace Battle for Information: Combating Internet Censorship

    Tue, Apr 22, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Amir Houmansadr, UTexas - Austin

    Talk Title: The Cyberspace Battle for Information: Combating Internet Censorship

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: The lecture is available to stream from your browser here starting at 4 PM. Please right-click the link to open in a new tab or window for best performance.

    The Internet has become ubiquitous, bringing many benefits to people across the globe. Unfortunately, Internet users face threats to their security and privacy: repressive regimes deprive them of freedom of speech and open access to information, governments and corporations monitor their online behavior, advertisers collect and sell their private data, and cybercriminals hurt them financially through security breaches.

    My research aims to make Internet communications more secure and privacy-preserving. In this talk, I will focus on the design, implementation, and analysis of tools that help users bypass Internet censorship. I will discuss the major challenges in building robust censorship circumvention tools, introduce two novel classes of systems that we have developed to overcome these challenges, and conclude with several directions for future research.

    Biography: Amir Houmansadr is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in August 2012. Amir’s research revolves around various network security and privacy problems, including Internet censorship circumvention, network traffic analysis, and anonymous communications. He has received several awards for his research, including the Best Practical Paper Award at the IEEE Symposium on Security & Privacy (Oakland) 2013.

    Host: Ethan Katz-Bassett

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Repeating EventMeet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, & Engineering Talk

    Wed, Apr 23, 2014

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Receptions & Special Events


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process; a student led walking tour of campus and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process and financial aid. Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m. Please visit https://esdweb.esd.usc.edu/unresrsvp/MeetUSC.aspx to check availability and make an appointment. Be sure to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - USC Admission Office

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • Computer Science General Faculty Meeting

    Wed, Apr 23, 2014 @ 12:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Computer Science General Faculty Meeting.

    Details emailed directly to attendees.

    RSVP link also to be provided.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 217

    Audiences: Invited Faculty Only

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • ASBME GM #24: Member Appreciation Day

    Wed, Apr 23, 2014 @ 07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Organizations

    Student Activity


    The end of the year is finally closing in and ASBME wants to take this opportunity to show everyone how much we appreciate YOU!! We will be giving out the following in preparation for the end of the school year: IN'N'OUT, blue books & other school supplies, red bull & instant coffee packs, study snacks, and other miscellaneous goodies - all for FREE!! In addition, we will have our raffle for those who participated in test bank submission!! We can't wait to see you there!!

    Location: Mark Taper Hall Of Humanities (THH) - 201

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Associated Students of Biomedical Engineering

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  • Mehfil Massive: South Asian Religions Remixed through Poetry and Music

    Wed, Apr 23, 2014 @ 07:30 PM - 09:30 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    University Calendar


    RSVP TO: http://web-app.usc.edu/ws/eo2/calendar/113/event/903819

    Legendary South Asian musicians and poets will come together to celebrate and investigate the rich diversity of South Asian spiritual influences. From ghazals set to music and sung throughout the Muslim world to Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel Prize–winning Gitanjali (Prayer Offering of Song), collaborations between poets and musicians have been a staple of South Asian religious life for centuries. In Mughal courts, nightly mehfils brought these performers together and elevated their collaborations to high art. This tradition will get a 21st-century update in a landmark evening featuring performances by internationally renowned diasporic South Asian artists including Sufi-influenced rock guitarist Salman Ahmad, vocalist and ten-string double-violin master Gingger Shankar, Mumbai-based dubstep DJ Bandish Projekt and hip hop artist and producer Brooklyn Shanti in collaboration with award-winning poets Kazim Ali, Tarfia Faizullah, Bhanu Kapil, Mandeep Sethi and Amarnath Ravva.

    Organized by Neelanjana Banerjee (Kaya Press), Varun Soni (Dean of Religious Life), Viet Nguyen (American Studies and Ethnicity) and Nayan Shah (American Studies and Ethnicity). Co-sponsored by American Studies and Ethnicity and the Office of Religious Life.

    For further information on this event:
    visionsandvoices@usc.edu

    Location: George Finley Bovard Administration Building & Kenneth Norris Jr. Auditorium (ADM) -

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Visions and Voices

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  • Mehfil Massive: South Asian Religions Remixed through Poetry and Music

    Wed, Apr 23, 2014 @ 07:30 PM - 09:30 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Receptions & Special Events


    Legendary South Asian musicians and poets will come together to celebrate and investigate the rich diversity of South Asian spiritual influences. From ghazals set to music and sung throughout the Muslim world to Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel Prize–winning Gitanjali (Prayer Offering of Song), collaborations between poets and musicians have been a staple of South Asian religious life for centuries. In Mughal courts, nightly mehfils brought these performers together and elevated their collaborations to high art. This tradition will get a 21st-century update in a landmark evening featuring performances by internationally renowned diasporic South Asian artists including Sufi-influenced rock guitarist Salman Ahmad, vocalist and ten-string double-violin master Gingger Shankar, Mumbai-based dubstep DJ Bandish Projekt and hip hop artist and producer Brooklyn Shanti in collaboration with award-winning poets Kazim Ali, Tarfia Faizullah, Bhanu Kapil, Mandeep Sethi and Amarnath Ravva.The evening will be hosted by comedian/writer/performance artist D'Lo.

    Organized by Neelanjana Banerjee (Kaya Press), Varun Soni (Dean of Religious Life), Viet Nguyen (American Studies and Ethnicity) and Nayan Shah (American Studies and Ethnicity). Co-sponsored by American Studies and Ethnicity and the Office of Religious Life.

    Location: George Finley Bovard Administration Building & Kenneth Norris Jr. Auditorium (ADM) -

    Audiences: RSVP Required at http://web-app.usc.edu/ws/eo2/calendar/113/event/903819

    Posted By: Daria Yudacufski

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  • PwC's Aspire to Lead Webcast and Photo contest

    Thu, Apr 24, 2014 @ 09:30 AM - 10:30 AM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Services

    Workshops & Infosessions


    PwC will be hosting its first ever live, global forum on women and leadership. The event is part of "Aspire to Lead: The PwC's Women's Leadership Series," which includes a number of programs and workshops hosted by PwC that are designed to provide college students with the tools to help them build their leadership skills.

    The first event in the series will feature special guest speaker Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's COO and the author of Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead and Lean In for Graduates. Sheryl will join PwC partners and staff in an exchange of perspectives, and answer questions on the challenges women face when transitioning from campus to career. The event will be broadcast live from Facebook's campus in California.

    You can learn more about the live event and register here.

    In conjunction with the webcast, we are also running an Aspire photo contest. We're asking your students to use Facebook and Instagram to upload an original photograph that answers the question, To what do you Aspire??We will choose the top 12 entrants and the public will then choose the winners. One winner will get to attend the webcast in person and meet Sheryl.

    Students can enter by uploading an original photo with a great caption to our Facebook contest page or to Instagram using the hashtag #PwCAspire. We will choose the top 12 entrants and the public will then choose the winner. Contest finalists are announced and public voting begins March 27. We will announce the winner on April 4. Learn more about our photo challenge, including the contest rules, at www.facebook.com/pwcuscareers.

    Location: Online

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Services

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  • USC DEN@Viterbi Information Session

    Thu, Apr 24, 2014 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Distance Education Network

    Workshops & Infosessions


    The USC Viterbi School of Engineering Distance Education Network (DEN@Viterbi) strives to meet the needs of engineering professionals, providing the opportunity to advance your education while maintaining your career and other commitments. By breaking down geographical and scheduling barriers, DEN allows you to take your classes anytime and anywhere.

    Join this information session to learn more about the 40+ graduate level programs and continuing education offerings available completely online.

    Click to RSVP

    Audiences: RSVP Required

    Posted By: Viterbi Professional Programs

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  • CS RASC Seminar: Steven M. LaValle (Oculus VR) - Virtual Reality, Really!

    Thu, Apr 24, 2014 @ 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Steven M. LaValle, Oculus VR

    Talk Title: Virtual Reality, Really!

    Series: RASC Seminar Series

    Abstract: It has been an exciting adventure as we race to bring the consumer version of the Oculus Rift VR headset into widespread use for games, cinema, therapy, virtual travel, and beyond. Palmer Luckey's 2012 prototype demonstrated that smartphone-based advances in display and sensing technology enable a lightweight, high field-of-view VR experience that is affordable by the masses. This has stimulated widespread interest across many industries, research labs, and potential end users of this technology. This talk will highlight some of the ongoing technical challenges, including game development, user interfaces, perceptual psychology, and accurate head tracking. Although VR has been researched for decades, many new challenges arise because of the ever changing technology and the rising demand for new kinds of VR content.

    Biography: Steven M. LaValle is Principal Scientist at Oculus VR, Inc. He is a roboticist and a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is best known for his introduction of rapidly exploring random tree (RRT) algorithms, and his book on Planning Algorithms, one of the most highly cited texts in the field. In 2012, he was one of seven faculty named as a University Scholar at UIUC for 2012-2014.

    Host: Nora Ayanian

    Location: Kaprielian Hall (KAP) - 156

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Distinguished Lectures: Materials Genome as The Last Mile Perspective and Thermodynamics of Computing

    Thu, Apr 24, 2014 @ 12:45 PM - 01:50 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Sadasivan Shankar,

    Talk Title: Materials Genome as The Last Mile Perspective and Thermodynamics of Computing

    Series: Distinguished Lectures

    Host: Prof. Vashishta

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Ryan Choi

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  • Programming Bits and Atoms

    Thu, Apr 24, 2014 @ 01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Neil Gershenfeld, MIT Center for Bits and Atoms

    Talk Title: Programming Bits and Atoms

    Abstract: Software is digital, but not physical: it is represented by bits of information that are written without physical units. Hardware is physical, but not digital: it can contain information, but its own construction is continuous. I will present research on aligning
    the descriptions of software and hardware, and explore its implications for the future of computation and fabrication.

    Biography: Prof. Neil Gershenfeld is the Director of MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms. His unique laboratory is breaking down boundaries between the digital and physical worlds, from creating molecular quantum computers to virtuosic musical instruments. Technology from his lab has been seen and used in settings including New York's Museum of Modern Art and rural Indian villages, the White House and the World Economic Forum, inner-city community centers and automobile safety systems, Las Vegas shows and Sami herds. He is the author of numerous technical publications, patents, and books including Fab, When Things Start To Think, The Nature of Mathematical Modeling, and The Physics of Information
    Technology, and has been featured in media such as The New York Times, The Economist, NPR, CNN, and PBS. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, has been named one of Scientific American's 50 leaders in science and technology, as one of
    40 Modern-Day Leonardos by the Museum of Science and Industry, one of Popular Mechanic's 25 Makers, has been selected as a CNN/Time/Fortune Principal Voice, and by Prospect/Foreign Policy as one of the top 100 public intellectuals. Dr. Gershenfeld has
    a BA in Physics with High Honors from Swarthmore College, a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Cornell University, honorary doctorates from Swarthmore College and Strathclyde
    University, was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard University Society of Fellows, and a member of the research staff at Bell Labs.

    More Information: Gershefeld.jpg.pdf

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Estela Lopez

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  • CS Colloquium: Ariel Feldman (University of Pennsylvania) - Designing Systems for Skeptics

    Thu, Apr 24, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Ariel Feldman, University of Pennsylvania

    Talk Title: Designing Systems for Skeptics

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: In modern distributed systems, users are increasingly being asked to rely on third parties who do not necessarily have their best interests in mind. For example, cloud hosted services offer a myriad of benefits, but they require users to trust the service provider with the confidentiality and integrity of their data and the correctness of the computations performed on it. The recent history of accidental and malicious data disclosures, misuse of users’ data, surreptitious censorship, and warrantless surveillance has shown that this trust is often misplaced. Moreover, non-technical mechanisms, such as laws and market incentives, have proved to be insufficient to mitigate these threats.

    In this talk, I will present two implemented systems that enable their users to benefit from cloud deployment, but that are designed “for skeptics:” they provide users with guarantees that hold even if the service provider cannot be trusted. The first system, SPORC, makes it possible to build low-latency collaborative Web applications such as shared text editors, group calendars, and instant messaging applications with an untrusted provider. The provider only sees encrypted data and cannot deviate from correct execution without detection. And if the provider does misbehave, SPORC gives users a means to recover. Pantry, the second system, enables a user to outsource a general purpose computation to a potentially faulty provider and yet verify that the computation was performed correctly. Unlike prior efforts, Pantry allows verifiable computations to operate on remotely-stored data that the user does not possess, opening the way to a wide variety of uses such as MapReduce jobs and database queries.

    Biography: Ari Feldman is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania whose research focuses on building systems that provide confidentiality, integrity, and correctness by design rather than solely through non-technical means, drawing on techniques from distributed systems, applied cryptography, and theory. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from Princeton University in 2012 under the supervision of Edward W. Felten and received an A.B. in computer science and in ethics and political philosophy from Brown University.

    Host: Minlan Yu

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Leadership in the Arts: What Does It Mean? Featuring the Kronos Quartet

    Thu, Apr 24, 2014 @ 07:30 PM - 09:30 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    University Calendar


    RSVP TO: http://web-app.usc.edu/ws/eo2/calendar/113/event/903820

    For 40 years, San Francisco’s Kronos Quartet has continually reimagined the string-quartet experience. One of the world’s most celebrated and influential ensembles, they have performed thousands of concerts and released more than 50 recordings. The nonprofit Kronos Performing Arts Association (KPAA) manages all aspects of the quartet’s work. Together, the Kronos Quartet and KPAA have set a striking example of arts leadership, creating extraordinary change in the field of classical music through their vision, innovation and commitment to a lifetime of growth and change. In so doing, they have redefined what is possible for hundreds of young musicians. Kronos exemplifies arts leadership at its most transformative. Join Kenneth Foster, director of the newly launched graduate Arts Leadership Program in the USC Thornton School of Music, for an interactive discussion/performance with these remarkable musicians about their history, what inspires them and how they sustain a creative vision of the future for themselves and for their field.

    Organized by the USC Thornton School of Music. Co-sponsored by Classical KUSC 91.5.

    Photo: Jay Blakesberg

    For further information on this event:
    visionsandvoices@usc.edu

    Location: George Finley Bovard Administration Building & Kenneth Norris Jr. Auditorium (ADM) -

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Visions and Voices

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  • Arts Leadership: A Contemporary Vision Featuring the Kronos Quartet

    Thu, Apr 24, 2014 @ 07:30 PM - 09:30 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: The Kronos Quartet,

    Talk Title: Arts Leadership: A Contemporary Vision Featuring the Kronos Quartet

    Abstract: For 40 years, San Francisco’s Kronos Quartet has continually reimagined the string-quartet experience. One of the world’s most celebrated and influential ensembles, they have performed thousands of concerts and released more than 50 recordings. The nonprofit Kronos Performing Arts Association (KPAA) manages all aspects of the quartet’s work. Together, the Kronos Quartet and KPAA have set a striking example of arts leadership, creating extraordinary change in the field of classical music through their vision, innovation and commitment to a lifetime of growth and change. In so doing, they have redefined what is possible for hundreds of young musicians. Kronos exemplifies arts leadership at its most transformative. Join Kenneth Foster, director of the newly launched graduate Arts Leadership Program in the USC Thornton School of Music, for an interactive discussion/performance with these remarkable musicians about their history, what inspires them and how they sustain a creative vision of the future for themselves and for their field.

    Organized by the USC Thornton School of Music. Co-sponsored by Classical KUSC 91.5.

    More Info: http://web-app.usc.edu/ws/eo2/calendar/113/event/903820

    Location: George Finley Bovard Administration Building & Kenneth Norris Jr. Auditorium (ADM) -

    Audiences: RSVP Required

    Posted By: Daria Yudacufski

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  • Repeating EventMeet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, & Engineering Talk

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Receptions & Special Events


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process; a student led walking tour of campus and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process and financial aid. Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m. Please visit https://esdweb.esd.usc.edu/unresrsvp/MeetUSC.aspx to check availability and make an appointment. Be sure to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - USC Admission Office

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • Game Theory and Human Behavior [GTHB] Annual Symposium 2014

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014

    Computer Science

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Speakers will include:

    Meredith Gore, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University

    Michael Macy, Department of Sociology, Cornell

    Jason Hartline, Computer Science, Northwestern

    Gilberto Montibeller, Dept. of Management, London School of Economics

    Elisabeth Pate-Cornell, Management Science and Engineering, Stanford

    Paul Slovic, Psychology, University of Oregon

    Peter Stone, Computer Science, University of Texas at Austin

    For more details please contact Jie Zheng at jiezheng@usc.edu Or check out http://gthb.usc.eduEvents/2014.ht

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - Auditorium

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • NL Seminar-Partitioning Networks with Node Attributes by Compressing Information Flow

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014 @ 03:00 AM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Linhong Zhu, USC/ISI

    Talk Title: Partitioning Networks with Node Attributes by Compressing Information Flow

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: Real-world networks are often organized as modules or communities of similar nodes that serve as functional units. These networks are also rich in content, with nodes having distinguishing features or attributes. In order to discover a network's modular structure, it is necessary to take into account not only its links but also node attributes. We describe an information-theoretic method that identifies modules by compressing descriptions of information flow on a network. Our formulation introduces node content into the description of information flow, which we then minimize to discover groups of nodes with similar attributes that also tend to trap the flow of information. The method has several advantages: it is conceptually simple and does not require ad-hoc parameters to specify the number of modules or to control the relative contribution of links and node attributes to network structure. We apply the proposed method to partition real-world networks with known community structure. We demonstrate that adding node attributes helps recover the underlying community structure in content-rich networks more effectively than using links alone. In addition, we show that our method is faster and more accurate than alternative state-of-the-art algorithms.

    Biography: Linhong Zhu is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Information Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, under the supervision of Dr. Kristina Lerman and Dr. Aram Galstyan. Before that, she worked as a scientist-I at Institute for Infocomm Research Singapore from Oct 2010 to Jan 2013. She got her B Eng. Degree in Computer Science from University of Science and Technology of China in 2006 (2002-2006) and received her Ph.D. Degree in Computer Engineering from Nanyang Technological University (2006-2011). Her research interests focus on large-scale social network analysis and sentiment analysis.

    Home Page http://www.isi.edu/people/linhong/research
    Host: Kevin Knight & Yang Gao

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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  • ACL2014 Practice Talk: Kneser- Ney Smoothing on Expected Counts

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014 @ 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Hui Zhang, USC/ISI

    Talk Title: Kneser- Ney Smoothing on Expected Counts

    Abstract: Widely used in speech and language processing, Kneser-Ney (KN) smoothing has consistently been shown to be one of the best-performing smoothing methods. However, KN smoothing assumes integer counts, limiting its potential uses—for example, inside Expectation-Maximization. In this paper, we propose a generaliza- tion of KN smoothing that operates on fractional counts, or, more precisely, on distributions over counts. We rederive all the steps of KN smoothing to operate on count distributions instead of integral counts, and apply it to two tasks where KN smoothing was not applicable before: one in language model adaptation, and the other in word alignment. In both cases, our method improves performance significantly.

    Biography: Hui Zhang is a fourth year PhD student working with Professor David Chiang at the USC Information Sciences Institute. His main research interests are in statistical machine translation and machine learning.
    He has focused on domain adaptation and smoothing techniques.

    Home Page:

    https://sites.google.com/site/zhangh1982/
    Host: Yang Gao

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Peter Zamar

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  • The W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Colloquim

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014 @ 01:00 PM - 01:50 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Eric M.V. Hoek, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, UCLA

    Talk Title: Water Technology Research, Innovation and Entrepreneurship to Address Global Challenge

    Host: W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Program

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Christine Viterbi Admission & Student Affairs

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  • CS RASC Seminar: Mac Schwager (Boston University) - Controlling Groups of Robots with Unreliable Relative Sensing

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014 @ 02:00 PM - 03:20 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Mac Schwager, Boston University

    Talk Title: Controlling Groups of Robots with Unreliable Relative Sensing

    Series: RASC Seminar Series

    Abstract: Groups of robots working collaboratively have the potential to change the way we sense and interact with our environment at large scales. However, in order to be useful in the real world, multi-robot systems must perform without global information, and they must adapt to faulty sensors. This talk will describe our recent work in controlling groups of robots with unreliable relative sensing measurements. We will treat two basic multi-robot problems: formation control and coverage control. In the first problem, we would like the robots to converge to a desired formation without a shared global reference frame, using only relative distance and bearing measurements. We propose a novel nonlinear control architecture that ensures asymptotic convergence to the desired formation. We also implement this controller on a network of quadrotor aerial robots. The robots use onboard vision, computing relative pose estimates from shared features in their images, in order to execute the formation controller without any global pose information. In the second problem we consider deploying a group of sensing robots to cover an environment with their sensors, however some (a priori unknown) robots have faulty sensors. We propose a decentralized adaptive control approach by which the robots collaboratively determine which robots have faulty sensors, and reposition themselves in order to compensate for the sensor faults. Convergence to a locally optimal sensing configuration is proven using a Lyapunov analysis.


    Biography: Mac Schwager is an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Division of Systems Engineering at Boston University. He obtained his BS degree in 2000 from Stanford University, his MS degree from MIT in 2005, and his PhD degree from MIT in 2009. He was a postdoctoral researcher in the GRASP lab at the University of Pennsylvania from 2010 to 2012. His research interests are in distributed algorithms for control, perception, and learning in groups of robots and animals. He received the NSF CAREER award in 2014.

    Host: Nora Ayanian

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Energy Informatics Seminar

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Krishna Palem, Rice University

    Talk Title: Sensoptimized Systems for “Good enough” Computing: Ultra-efficient Cortical Processors through Melding Neuroscience with Inexact Architectures

    Series: Energy Informatics Distinguished Seminar Series

    Abstract: Increasingly, information systems such as cellphones, iPods and glasses—more broadly, embedded systems—are delivering information to be consumed by our senses. Such information, in the form of speech, graphics, or video, is subject to varying levels of processing by our nervous systems, followed by our higher cognitive functions in the brain. Yet, system designs today do not often take advantage of the compensatory processing done neuro-cognitively by our brain. Rather, the current hardware, software, and industrial design methodologies aim to deliver the best possible quality to maximize the user’s experience. The resulting computing platforms are over-engineered and expensive—in terms of monetary cost, and the amount of energy (or battery) consumed. For several years now, we have been developing a philosophy and a design methodology to counter this trend aimed at the innovation of digital computing systems which, when interacting with our senses, are optimized to be just “good enough” and thus not over-engineered This is achieved by factoring in the compensatory neuro-cognitive processing done by our sensory pathways, and by trading away the accuracy of the system in return for disproportionately high savings or gains. The resulting sensoptimied systems are meant to be significantly more efficient than those designed conventionally. At their core, our sensoptimized systems are realized using inexact integrated circuits (ICs) and computing architectures, sometimes dubbed probabilistic CMOS (PCMOS)—a technology and design methodology which our group has been developing for over a decade. Looking into the future, inexact circuits and sensoptimization could be the basis for realizing families of cortical processors which meld principles of neuroscience with the design of good-enough computing platforms. Here, the opportunities are many and we will conclude the technical portion of our talk with an overview of a sensoptimized cortical processor we are currently developing for supporting computer-vision at the embedded scale.

    Biography: Krishna V. Palem is the Ken and Audrey Kennedy Professor at Rice University with appointments in CS, in ECE, and Statistics, and is a scholar in the Baker Institute for Public Policy. He founded and directed the NTU-Rice Institute on Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics. He was a Moore Distinguished Faculty Fellow at Caltech, and a Schonbrunn Fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he was recognized for excellence in teaching. His advisee Suren Talla was awarded the Janet Fabri Prize for outstanding dissertation, and his related work on the foundations of architecture assembly for designing reconfigurable embedded SoC architectures, developed at Proceler Inc. which he co-founded as a CTO, was a nominee for the Analysts choice awards as one of the four outstanding technologies. A decade ago, he pioneered a novel technology dubbed Probabilistic CMOS (PCMOS) which resulted in inexact or approximate computing. PCMOS has been recognized by three best-paper awards, as one of the ten technologies 'likely to change the way we live' by MIT's Technology Review, and as one of the seven 'emerging world changing technologies' by IEEE as part of its 125th anniversary celebrations. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, the ACM and the IEEE. In 2012, Forbes (India) ranked him second on the list of eighteen scientists who are “..some of the finest minds of Indian origin.” He is the recipient of the 2008 W. Wallace McDowell Award, IEEE Computer Society's highest technical award and one of computing's most prestigious individual honors.

    Host: Viktor Prasanna

    More Info: http://cei.usc.edu/news

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • Integrated Systems Seminar Series - Spring 2014

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014 @ 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Waleed Khalil, Ohio State University

    Talk Title: Towards the Design of Robust Wide Tuning Range and Low Phase Noise mm-Wave VCOs: Challenges, Solutions and Recent Advances

    Series: Integrated Systems Seminar Series

    Abstract: Over the past few years, there has a been a growing demand for mm-wave circuits with emerging applications such as Gigabit WLAN and Short Range Radars. More recently, mm-wave technology has been touted for future 5G cellular systems, eclipsing a long era where low GHz systems dominated the field of wireless systems. Moving forward, we expect the mass market adaptation of these technologies to force the shift towards low-cost Si-based processes. However, in to order to succeed in this space, we need to push the Si performance closer to the well-entrenched incumbent III-V technologies. In the VCO domain, major challenges still remain in meeting the tuning range and phase noise specifications while maintaining high yield. In light of these challenges, this seminar will present our current and future research work to build mm-wave VCOs circuits with record benchmarks. Different topologies in both CMOS and SiGe technologies will be covered. Also, a new analytical model that facilitates an efficient optimization of the VCO turning range and phase noise is presented. The model is exploited to analyze the impact of technology scaling on the achievable performance bounds.

    Biography: Dr. Khalil received his B.S.E.E. and M.S.E.E degrees from the University of Minnesota in 1992 and 1993, respectively. In 2008, he received his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from Arizona State University. He is currently serving as an Assistant Professor at the ECE department and the ElectroScience Lab, The Ohio State University. He conducts research in SDRs, digital intensive RF and mm-wave circuits and systems, high performance clocking circuits and GHz A/D and D/A circuits. Prior to joining OSU, Prof. Khalil spent 16 years at Intel Corporation where he held various technical and leadership positions in wireless and wireline communication groups. While at Intel, he was appointed the lead engineer at the advanced wireless communications group, where he played an instrumental role in the development of the industry’s first Analog Front-end IC for third generation radios (3G). He later co-founded a startup group to develop Intel’s first RF front-end IC, as a principle leader of the radio transmitter chain. During his work at Intel, he received the prestigious Intel Quality Award in 2005. Dr. Khalil’s research group has received several paper awards, among them TSMC’s outstanding research award in 2010 and the best paper award in the Wireless Innovation Forum and Phase Array Symposium in 2013. He authored 10 issued and several other pending patents, over 50 journal and conference papers and three books/book chapters. He is a senior member of IEEE and serves in the steering committee for the RFIC Symposium and as a guest faculty at the Air Force Research Laboratory.

    Host: Hossien Hashemi, Mike Chen, Mahta Moghaddam, Sushil Subramanian

    More Info: http://mhi.usc.edu/activities/integrated-systems/

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Sushil Subramanian

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  • Astani CEE Ph.D. Seminar

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Judy Zhu , Ph.D. Candidate

    Talk Title: Soil Structure Interaction with Vertically Incident Plane P-waves: Rigid Foundation

    Abstract: An analytic solution of the interaction of building with the soil for vertical incident plane p-waves is presented. The soil half-space is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic and elastic; foundation is hemispherical and rigid; and the building is cylindrical with the same radius and center-to-center to the foundation. It is shown that the result is dependent on densities of building, foundation and soil, the ratio of building radius and height, and wave numbers of building and the soil.

    Host: Astani CEE Department

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 102

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • Single Wing Turquoise Bird

    Fri, Apr 25, 2014 @ 07:30 PM - 09:30 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    University Calendar


    RSVP TO: http://web-app.usc.edu/ws/eo2/calendar/113/event/903811

    Single Wing Turquoise Bird was among the most sophisticated of the 1960s and ’70s psychedelic light shows. Formed in 1968 in Los Angeles, “the Bird” accompanied legendary bands including Cream, the Velvet Underground, Sly and the Family Stone, Pink Floyd and the Grateful Dead. Later, they performed to music by Steve Reich, Terry Riley and other avant-garde composers. With a core group of seven artists improvising collectively in real-time, the group used overhead projectors, slide projectors and high-intensity 16mm film projectors to create swirling visual compositions made from multicolored immiscible liquids. Anaïs Nin described their shows as “like a thousand modern paintings flowing and sparkling.” The Bird reformed several years ago, adding new members and incorporating digital technologies. The group will present two performances accompanied by Serbian guitarist Miroslav Tadic. Each performance will be unique, as the images and music are improvised, reflecting the interplay between the members of the Single Wing Turquoise Bird and guest musicians.

    A three-day workshop will teach students about projected-light equipment, improvisation and collaboration in multimedia performance. The workshop is open to USC students only. For information about the workshop, please contact Christine Panushka at panushka@usc.edu.

    Organized by Christine Panushka (Animation and Digital Art) and David E. James (Critical Studies).

    Photo: Andy Romanoff

    For further information on this event:
    visionsandvoices@usc.edu

    Location: Cinema Television Center Complex (CTC) - School of Cinematic Arts Complex, Stage 4

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Visions and Voices

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  • Single Wing Turquoise Bird

    Sat, Apr 26, 2014 @ 07:30 PM - 09:30 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    University Calendar


    RSVP TO: http://web-app.usc.edu/ws/eo2/calendar/113/event/903811

    Single Wing Turquoise Bird was among the most sophisticated of the 1960s and ’70s psychedelic light shows. Formed in 1968 in Los Angeles, “the Bird” accompanied legendary bands including Cream, the Velvet Underground, Sly and the Family Stone, Pink Floyd and the Grateful Dead. Later, they performed to music by Steve Reich, Terry Riley and other avant-garde composers. With a core group of seven artists improvising collectively in real-time, the group used overhead projectors, slide projectors and high-intensity 16mm film projectors to create swirling visual compositions made from multicolored immiscible liquids. Anaïs Nin described their shows as “like a thousand modern paintings flowing and sparkling.” The Bird reformed several years ago, adding new members and incorporating digital technologies. The group will present two performances accompanied by Serbian guitarist Miroslav Tadic. Each performance will be unique, as the images and music are improvised, reflecting the interplay between the members of the Single Wing Turquoise Bird and guest musicians.

    A three-day workshop will teach students about projected-light equipment, improvisation and collaboration in multimedia performance. The workshop is open to USC students only. For information about the workshop, please contact Christine Panushka at panushka@usc.edu.

    Organized by Christine Panushka (Animation and Digital Art) and David E. James (Critical Studies).

    Photo: Andy Romanoff

    For further information on this event:
    visionsandvoices@usc.edu

    Location: School Of Cinematic Arts (SCA) - School of Cinematic Arts Complex, Stage 4

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Visions and Voices

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  • Single Wing Turquoise Bird

    Sat, Apr 26, 2014 @ 07:30 PM - 09:30 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Receptions & Special Events


    Single Wing Turquoise Bird was among the most sophisticated of the 1960s and ’70s psychedelic light shows. Formed in 1968 in Los Angeles, “the Bird” accompanied legendary bands including Cream, the Velvet Underground, Sly and the Family Stone, Pink Floyd and the Grateful Dead. Later, they performed to music by Steve Reich, Terry Riley and other avant-garde composers. With a core group of seven artists improvising collectively in real-time, the group used overhead projectors, slide projectors and high-intensity 16mm film projectors to create swirling visual compositions made from multicolored immiscible liquids. Anaïs Nin described their shows as “like a thousand modern paintings flowing and sparkling.” The Bird reformed several years ago, adding new members and incorporating digital technologies. The group will present two performances accompanied by Serbian guitarist Miroslav Tadic. Each performance will be unique, as the images and music are improvised, reflecting the interplay between the members of the Single Wing Turquoise Bird and guest musicians.

    A three-day workshop will teach students about projected-light equipment, improvisation and collaboration in multimedia performance. The workshop is open to USC students only. For information about the workshop, please contact Christine Panushka at panushka@usc.edu.

    Organized by Christine Panushka (Animation and Digital Art) and David E. James (Critical Studies).

    Location: George Finley Bovard Administration Building & Kenneth Norris Jr. Auditorium (ADM) -

    Audiences: RSVP Required: http://web-app.usc.edu/ws/eo2/calendar/113/event/903811

    Posted By: Daria Yudacufski

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