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Events Calendar



Events for the 4th week of February

  • Epstein ISE Department Seminar

    Mon, Feb 23, 2015 @ 09:00 AM - 10:00 AM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Carlos Abad, PhD Candidate, Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department, Columbia University

    Talk Title: Efficient Management of Energy Resources

    Abstract: One of the greatest challenges for humanity in the 21st century is to provide adequate energy to allow everyone on the planet to live decent lives, while managing the impact of a rising population and the decline in fossil fuels. In this talk, we will discuss two problems that arise in this context. The first one is faced by electric utilities in the US that use demand response (DR) to handle the supply-demand mismatch. Many DR programs are managed using automated DR devices (ADRs) that, upon receiving a signal from the utility, trigger strategies to reduce the consumption of customers. Most ADRs are one-way communication only; hence, the utility cannot know whether an ADR is reacting to its signal, and is forced to send repairmen periodically. We propose a method that infers the ADR state from meter readings, and uses the estimates to schedule the ADR maintenance near optimally, which results in cost savings of up to 80% with respect to the current practice. The second problem is faced by utilities providing power to isolated communities in sub-Saharan countries. Currently, these utilities use a very simple control. Based on the appliances in their household, customers are assigned individual power limits. In order to protect the micro-grid's power inverter, whenever a household consumption exceeds the assigned power limit, its electricity supply is interrupted. As overall usage can surpass the inverter capacity leading to a shutdown of the entire system, the operator faces a trade-off between revenue and reliability. We propose a robust optimization approach to the problem of dynamically assigning power limits to maximize the utility's revenue. Using the robust control policy can lead to as much as a 100% increase in revenue without sacrificing reliability. This is joint work with Garud Iyengar and Vijay Modi.


    Biography: Carlos Abad is a PhD candidate in the Industrial Engineering and Operations Research department at Columbia University. His work is focused on developing computational tools for effectively managing energy resources to achieve two goals: sustainability and reliability. Specifically, he is interested in designing algorithms that allow small residential loads participating in demand management programs to be effectively utilized at the grid level, and methods that allow some of the poorest people in the world to have access to a reliable source of energy at a reasonable price.

    Host: Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    More Information: SEMINAR-Abad.doc

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Georgia Lum

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  • Viterbi/Ming Hsieh Institute Seminar

    Mon, Feb 23, 2015 @ 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Andrei Faraon, Applied Physics, Materials Science and Medical Engineering at California Institute of Technology

    Talk Title: Quantum light-matter interfaces based on rare-earthdoped crystals and nano-photonics

    Abstract: Quantum light-matter interfaces that reversibly map the quantum state of photons onto the quantum states of atoms, are essential components in the quantum engineering toolbox with applications in quantum communication, computing, and quantum-enabled sensing. In this talk I present our progress towards developing on-chip quantum light-matter interfaces based on nanophotonic resonators fabricated in rare-earthdoped crystals known to exhibit the longest optical and spin coherence times in the solid state. We recently demonstrated coherent control of neodymium (Nd3+) ions coupled to yttrium orthosilicate Y2SiO5 (YSO) photonic crystal nano-beam resonator. The coupling of the Nd3+ 883 nm 4I9/2-4F3/2 transition to the nanoresonator
    results in a 40 fold enhancement of the transition rate (Purcell effect), and increased optical absorption (~80%) - adequate for realizing efficient optical quantum memories via cavity impedance matching. Optical coherence times T2 up to 100 μs with low spectral diffusion were measured for ions embedded in
    photonic crystals, which are comparable to those observed in unprocessed bulk samples. This indicates that the remarkable coherence properties of REIs are preserved during nanofabrication process. Multi-temporal mode photon storage using stimulated photon echo and atomic frequency comb (AFC) protocols were implemented in these nano-resonators. Our current technology can be readily transferred to Erbium (Er) doped YSO devices, therefore opening the possibility of efficient on-chip optical quantum memory at 1.5 μm telecom wavelength. Integration with superconducting qubits can lead to devices for reversible quantum conversion of optical photons to microwave photons.

    Biography: Dr. Andrei Faraon is an Assistant Professor of Applied Physics, Materials Science and Medical Engineering at California Institute of Technology. After earning a B.S. degree in physics with honors in 2004 at California Institute of Technology, he received his M.S. in Electrical Engineering and PhD in Applied Physics both from Stanford University in 2009. At Stanford, Dr. Faraon was involved with seminal experiments on quantum optics
    using single indium arsenide quantum dots strongly coupled to photonic crystal cavities in gallium arsenide. After earning his PhD, Dr. Faraon spent three years as a postdoctoral fellow at Hewlett Packard Laboratories. At HP he was involved with pioneering experiments on diamond quantum photonic devices coupled to solid-state spins. He demonstrated the first nano-resonators coupled to single nitrogen vacancy centers in mono-crystalline diamond. Faraon left HP in 2012 to become an Assistant Professor at Caltech. At Caltech, he set up a laboratory specialized in developing nano-photonic technologies for devices that operate close to the fundamental limit of
    light-matter interaction. He is focused both on fundamental challenges on how to control the interaction between single atoms and single photons using nano-technologies, and on using nano-photonics to build cutting edge devices for bio-imaging, bio-sensing and photo-voltaic energy harvesting. He is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award and the AFOSR young investigator award.

    Host: Viterbi/MHI

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

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  • Seminar in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Feb 23, 2015 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Daniel Holland, PhD (Postdoctoral Fellow) & Thai Truong, PhD (Senior Scientist), Translational Imaging Center (USC Dornsife & Viterbi, Fraser Lab)

    Talk Title: Light sheet microscopy - a versatile tool for biological imaging

    Abstract: Biological research has always dreamed of being able to image every single cell in a live intact multicellular system, quantify the cellular behavior and gene expressions, follow the interactions among cells and between cells and the environment, and use the collected information to build a quantitative and predictive understanding. We will present our efforts toward realizing this dream, utilizing the unique imaging platform of light sheet microscopy, also known as selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM). As the name implies, SPIM uses a planar sheet of light to illuminate a sample, generating fluorescence over a thin optical section of the sample that is then collected by a wide-field imaging camera oriented orthogonal to the light sheet. We will explain how this simple twist in illumination geometry allows SPIM to have distinct advantages over conventional optical imaging techniques in imaging, at cellular resolution or better, live, fast, and/or large biological samples. We will describe past, current, and future work in our lab in developing and applying this imaging technology, including looking at morphogent gradient dynamics in developing embryos; dynamic motion of developing embryonic hearts; and understanding the synaptic neuroplasticity involved in sleep/wake and learning.

    Host: Stanley Yamashiro

    Location: OHE 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Astronautical Engineering Seminar

    Mon, Feb 23, 2015 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Ed Stanton, NASA Kennedy Space Flight Center

    Talk Title: Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 Post Mission Overview

    Abstract: Mr. Stanton will discuss a Post Mission Overview of the Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1). He will describe the manufacturing, launch, mission, and splash down of the EFT-1 vehicle. He will also give a brief overview of what is next for the Orion program.

    Biography: Ed Stanton is lead technical operations engineer in the Orion Production Operations Office at the Kennedy Space Center. He is responsible for facilitating the successful completion of manufacturing activities required to build the Orion spacecraft articles including the crew module, the service module and the launch abort system. He provides NASA oversight of the prime contractor Lockheed Martin and obtains insight of the Orion production status. This includes providing operational, electrical, fluids and mechanical engineering expertise, along with general project management skills in support of the assembly, integration, testing, and launch operations of the Orion spacecraft.

    Ed started his career at the NASA Johnson Space Center (1990-1997) in Houston, TX working Shuttle Approach and Landing software loads, then Secondary payloads, and later on the International Space Station’s (ISS) Robotic workstation. Ed then worked at NASA Ames Research Center (1997-2004) Mountain View, CA on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy Aircraft and on a proposal program to study Mars’ weather. For a year in 2004 while at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., Ed worked to define Constellation requirements. Since 2005 Ed has worked at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida starting as an ISS Ground Operations Engineer ISS and in 2007 started the Orion Production Operations tasks where he continues to work.

    Host: Dan Erwin

    More Info: http://astronautics.usc.edu/EdStanton.pdf

    Location: VHE 217

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Dan Erwin

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  • Novigo Information Session

    Mon, Feb 23, 2015 @ 06:00 PM - 07:30 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Services

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Novigo (formerly GOPA ITC) is a partner of SAP and specializes in SAP supply chain and transportation management consulting. We are looking for Junior SAP TM consultants and Trainees.

    More Information: Novigo info session flyer.pdf

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: All Viterbi

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Services

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  • CS Colloquium: Taylor Berg-Kirkpatrick (UC Berkeley)

    Tue, Feb 24, 2015 @ 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Taylor Berg-Kirkpatrick, UC Berkeley

    Talk Title: Structured Models for Unlocking Language Data

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: One way to provide deeper insight into data is to reason about the underlying causal process that produced it. I'll present model-based approaches for discovering and managing language data that incorporate rich causal structure in novel ways. First, I'll describe a new approach to automatic text summarization that incorporates syntactic structure into a decision process that learns from human summaries. Second, I'll describe an approach to historical document recognition that uses a statistical model of the historical printing press to reason about images, and, as a result, is able to decipher historical documents in an unsupervised fashion. I'll hint at how similar approaches can be used for a range of other problems and types of data.

    Event will be available to stream HERE

    Biography: Taylor Berg-Kirkpatrick is a PhD candidate in computer science at the University of California, Berkeley. He works with professor Dan Klein on using machine learning to understand structured human data, including language but also sources like music, document images, and other complex artifacts. Taylor completed his undergraduate degree in mathematics and computer science at Berkeley as well, where he won the departmental Dorothea Klumpke Roberts Prize in mathematics. As a graduate student, Taylor has received both the Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship and the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

    Host: Computer Science Department

    More Info: https://bluejeans.com/853935926

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • USC Viterbi STEM Spotlight on the Sonny Astani Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    Tue, Feb 24, 2015 @ 12:30 PM - 05:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    University Calendar


    The USC Viterbi STEM Spotlight series focuses on three departments each year. In February, the Sonny Astani Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering is being spotlighted. In the afternoon of Tuesday, 2/24, pre-registered middle & high school students will be visiting the research labs of Professors Childress, Sioutas, Masri, and Lynett. More information on the USC Viterbi STEM Spotlight can be found here: http://bit.ly/CEEspotlight

    Location: Kaprielian Hall (KAP) -

    Audiences: K-12 Schools pre-registered

    Posted By: Katie Mills

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  • Epstein Institute / ISE 651 Seminar Series

    Tue, Feb 24, 2015 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Michael C. Ferris, Professor of Computer Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison

    Talk Title: Modeling and Optimization within Interacting Systems

    Abstract: We consider models built up from a collection of optimizations within an interacting physical, economic or virtual system. We show how optimization and equilibrium concepts can be deployed and resulting models solved within an extended mathematical programming framework. Examples are drawn from sustainable land use modeling, power system design and economic operation, discrete Nash equilibria and risk analysis. The interplay between stochasticity, complementarity and hierarchical optimization will be highlighted.

    Biography: Michael C. Ferris is Professor of Computer Sciences and leads the Optimization Group within the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA. He received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, England in 1989.

    Dr. Ferris' research is concerned with algorithmic and interface development for large scale problems in mathematical programming, including links to the GAMS and AMPL modeling languages, and general purpose software such as PATH, NLPEC and EMP. He has worked on several applications of both optimization and complement-arity, including cancer treatment plan development, radiation therapy, video-on-demand data delivery, economic and traffic equilibria, structural and mechanical engineering.

    Ferris is a SIAM fellow, an INFORMS fellow, Ferris is a SIAM fellow, an INFORMS fellow, received the Beale-Orchard-Hays prize from the Mathematical Programming Society and is a past recipient of a NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He serves on the editorial boards of Mathematical Programming, SIAM Journal on Optimization, Transactions of Mathematical Software, and Optimization Methods and Software.

    More Information: Seminar-Ferris.docx

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Georgia Lum

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  • E-Week Tech Talk: SanDisk

    Tue, Feb 24, 2015 @ 05:00 PM - 06:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Come hear from SanDisk’s VP of Engineering and USC Alum, Jason Lin (BS/MSEE ‘97). Jason joined SanDisk just two years after graduating and has since become instrumental in leading the development of Client SSD products with 30 patents issued and many other pending worldwide.

    Refreshments will be provided.

    http://bit.ly/eweeksandisk201

    Location: Mark Taper Hall Of Humanities (THH) - 102

    Audiences: Undergrad

    Posted By: Christine D'Arcy

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  • Society of Women Engineers 6th General Meeting

    Tue, Feb 24, 2015 @ 06:30 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Organizations

    Student Activity


    Please check out the SWE USC facebook page for more event details!

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Society of Women Engineers Society of Women Engineers

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  • Repeating EventMeet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, & Engineering Talk

    Wed, Feb 25, 2015

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Receptions & Special Events


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process, a student led walking tour of campus, and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. During the engineering session we will discuss the curriculum, research opportunities, hands-on projects, entrepreneurial support programs, and other aspects of the engineering school. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process, and financial aid.

    Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m. Please make sure to check availability and register online for the session you wish to attend. Also, remember to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - USC Admission Office

    Audiences: Prospective Undergrads and Families

    View All Dates

    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • CS Colloquium: Andrea Thomaz (GATECH) - Robots Learning from Human Teachers

    Wed, Feb 25, 2015 @ 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Andrea Thomaz, Georgia Tech

    Talk Title: Robots Learning from Human Teachers

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: In this talk I present recent work from the Socially Intelligent Machines Lab at Georgia Tech.
    Our research aims to computationally model mechanisms of human social learning in order to build robots and other machines that are intuitive for people to teach. We take Machine Learning interactions and redesign interfaces and algorithms to support the collection of learning input from naive humans. This talk covers results on building computational models of reciprocal interactions, high-level task goal learning, low-level skill learning, and active learning interactions using humanoid robot platforms.

    The lecture will be available for live streaming HERE.

    Biography: Andrea L. Thomaz is an Associate Professor of Interactive Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She directs the Socially Intelligent Machines lab, which is affiliated with the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (IRIM). She earned a B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 1999, and Sc.M. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT in 2002 and 2006. Dr. Thomaz has published in the areas of Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, and Human-Robot Interaction. She received an ONR Young Investigator Award in 2008, and an NSF CAREER award in 2010. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, on NOVA Science Now, she was named one of MIT Technology Review’s TR 35 in 2009, and on Popular Science Magazine’s Brilliant 10 list in 2012.

    Host: Computer Science Department

    More Info: https://bluejeans.com/677132238

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Computer engineering seminar

    Wed, Feb 25, 2015 @ 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Farinaz Koushanfar, Rice University

    Talk Title: Engineering scalable privacy-preserving big and dense data analytics

    Abstract: Data analytics on massive and often sensitive contents regularly arise in various contemporary settings ranging from cloud computing and social networking, to online services, mobile applications, and distributed processing. In this talk, I present novel computer engineering-based solutions that uniquely enable efficient and scalable explorations of the underlying patterns and dependencies present across a complex dataset, with a focus on sensitive privacy-preserving applications. The first part of the talk addresses the challenge of minimizing the computing, storage and communication overhead of the learning algorithms down to the limits of data subspaces and underlying heterogeneous platform. I demonstrate data-aware, domain-specific methodologies that are applicable to a broad class of iterative matrix-based learning algorithms and particularly efficient for challenging datasets with dense dependencies. The new techniques and methods enable optimizing for hardware acceleration as well as real-time stream processing, while they simultaneously benefit the privacy-preserving computing by pushing the limits of costly data analytics to the theoretical bounds. The second portion of the talk discusses novel scalable engineering solutions for privacy preserving computing by Yao's Garbled Circuit (GC) allowing two parties to jointly compute a function while keeping their inputs private. In contrast with the existing (software based) GC methods, I illustrate how scalable and efficient GC computation can be achieved by leveraging a new folded function description and logic synthesis methods along with our created custom libraries and constraints.

    Evaluation results of our methodologies show significant improvements in memory footprint, network bandwidth, and the overall computing cost in terms of time and energy (power) compared with the prior art, often by orders of magnitude. Our scalable privacy-preserving approach enables us to implement functions that have not been reported before, small enough that they befit mobile/embedded devices. To facilitate automated end-to-end implementation, we provide a number of user-friendly APIs supported by our custom libraries. I discuss how our new findings will enable practically addressing several known classical challenges as well as exciting applications such as scalable privacy-preserving classification of visual content, secure data mining, and search.

    Biography: Farinaz Koushanfar is currently an Associate Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, where she directs the Adaptive Computing and Embedded Systems (ACES) Lab. She also serves as the: principal director of the TI DSP Leadership University program; and, as the associate partner of the Intel Collaborative Research Institute for Secure Computing. She received her Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from University of California Berkeley. Her research interests include embedded/cyber-physical systems (CPS) security, hardware trust, adaptive and customizable embedded systems design, and secure function evaluation. Professor Koushanfar received a number of awards and honors for her research, mentorship, and teaching including the PECASE from president Obama, ACM SIGDA Outstanding New Faculty Award, NAS Kavli fellowship, Cisco IoT Security Grand Challenge Award, Young faculty/CAREER awards from NSF, DARPA, ONR, ARO, MIT Technology Review TR-35, and a Best Student Paper Award at ACM SIGMOBILE (Mobicom).

    Host: Prof. Massoud Pedram

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • Computer Science Faculty Meeting

    Wed, Feb 25, 2015 @ 12:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Event details will be emailed to invited attendees.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 526

    Audiences: Invited Faculty Only

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Communications, Networks & Systems (CommNetS) Seminar

    Wed, Feb 25, 2015 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Negar Kiyavash, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Talk Title: A Timing Approach to Causal Network Inference

    Series: CommNetS

    Abstract: One of the paramount challenges of this century is that of understanding complex, dynamic, large-scale networks. Such high-dimensional networks, including communication, social, financial, and biological networks, cover the planet and dominate modern life. In this talk, we propose novel approaches to inference in such networks, using timing as an underutilized degree of freedom that provides rich information. We present a framework for learning the structure of the directed information graphs. These graphs are a new type of probabilistic graphical model based on directed information that succinctly capture casual dynamics among random processes in stochastic networks. In the presence of large data, we propose algorithms that identify optimal or near-optimal approximations to the topology of the network.

    Biography: Negar Kiyavash is Willett Faculty Scholar at the University of Illinois and a joint Associate Professor of Industrial and Enterprise Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering. She is also affiliated with the Coordinated Science Laboratory (CSL) and the Information Trust Institute. She received her Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2006. Her research interests are in design and analysis of algorithms for network inference and security. She is a recipient of NSF CAREER and AFOSR YIP awards and the Illinois College of Engineering Dean's Award for Excellence in Research.

    Host: Ashutosh Nayyar and the Ming Hsieh Institute

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Wed, Feb 25, 2015 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Alejandra Uranga, Research Engineer in the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    Talk Title: Recent Research in CFD and Aerodynamics

    Series: Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Seminar Series

    Abstract: This talk will present two research areas in aerodynamics. The first part will focus on the simulation of flows around straight and swept wings with separation-bubble transition at low Reynolds numbers. The findings are relevant to the design of Micro Air Vehicles and the study of animal flight. We use an Implicit Large Eddy Simulation approach with a high-order Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. The physical formulation is based only on first principles, and does not rely on explicit empirical subgrid models. The simulations were used to quantify the relative importance of Tollmien-Schlichting and Cross-Flow wave instabilities for a range of wing sweep angles. We also demonstrate the importance of non-linear TS and CF instability interactions for intermediate sweep angles.
    In the second part of this presentation we will present recent theoretical and experimental work targeting new energy-efficient transport aircraft. Novel configurations together with boundary layer ingesting propulsion promise very large savings in fuel burn even with current structural and engine technology. The experimental work is the first definitive measurement of the aerodynamic benefits of boundary layer ingestion for a realistic transport aircraft configuration.

    Biography: Dr Alejandra Uranga is a Research Engineer in the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. She holds a MASc from the University of Victoria, BC, Canada, and a PhD degree from MIT. Her research has been in Computational Fluid Dynamics, specifically the modeling and simulation of turbulence and transition. She is currently the project Technology Lead for design, development, simulation, and wind tunnel testing of an advanced transport aircraft concept under the NASA N+3 program.

    Host: Paul Ronney

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Valerie Childress

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  • Social Media in the Job Search

    Wed, Feb 25, 2015 @ 05:00 PM - 06:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Services

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Learn ways to utilize technology to find job opportunities, maximize your networking, and building an online presence!

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 123

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Services

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  • MATT Construction Info Session

    Wed, Feb 25, 2015 @ 05:30 PM - 07:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Services

    Workshops & Infosessions


    You're invited to attend MATT Construction's information session to learn more about their company and current opportunities.

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: All Viterbi

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Services

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  • MFD - Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Graduate Seminar

    Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 12:45 AM - 01:50 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Professor Masoud Soroush, Drexel University

    Talk Title: Long-Term Academia-Industry Collaboration: The Drexel-DuPont Experience

    Series: Graduate Seminar Series

    Abstract: Long-term academia-industry research collaboration is rewarding but challenging.
    Drexel and DuPont collaborated at different levels for more than a decade. What
    began as a personal collaboration in multirate state estimation later evolved into a broad university-corporation collaboration in process systems engineering and
    polymer engineering lasting more than a decade. In this talk, the evolution of this collaboration, in terms of the type of projects involved and the level of corporation participation, is described. The challenges and rewards of such a collaboration are described based on this collaboration experience. Results of collaborative projects involving multirate state estimation, instrument fault detection and identification, polymer reaction engineering, and quantum-chemical study of acrylate self-initiation reactions are presented.

    Biography: Masoud Soroush is a Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA. He received his BS (Chemical Engineering) from Abadan Institute of Technology,Iran and his MS (Chemical Engineering), MS (Electrical Engineering: Systems), and PhD (Chemical Engineering) from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He was a Visiting Scientist at DuPont Marshall Lab 2002-03 and a Visiting Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Princeton University in 2008. His awards include the Faculty Early CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 1997, the O. Hugo Schuck Best Paper Award from theAmerican Automatic Control Council in 1999, and the Faculty Achievement Award for Excellence in Teaching from Drexel University in 1999. His research interests are in process systems engineering; mathematical modeling, analysis, and computational design and optimization of fuel cells, solar cells, and power storage systems; probabilistic modeling, risk assessment, and prediction of rare events; fault detection and identification; polymer engineering; and quantum chemical calculations. He was the AIChE Director on the American Automatic Control Council Board of Directors 2010-2013 and the AIChE CAST 10B Programming Coordinator in 2009.

    Host: Prof. Sahimi

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Ryan Choi

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  • Epstein ISE Department Seminar

    Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Yuekai Sun, Ph.D. Candidate, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford University

    Talk Title: Distributed Estimation and Inference for Sparse Regression

    Abstract: We address two outstanding challenges in sparse regression: (i) computationally efficient estimation in distributed settings (ii) valid inference for the selected coefficients. The main computational challenge in a distributed setting is harnessing the computational capabilities of all the machines while keeping communication costs low. We devise an approach that requires only a single round of communication among the machines. We show the approach recovers the convergence rate of the (centralized) lasso as long as each machine has access to an adequate number of samples. Turning to the second challenge, we devise an approach to post-selection inference by conditioning on the selected model. In a nutshell, our approach gives inferences with the same frequency interpretation as those given by data/sample splitting, but it is more broadly applicable and more powerful. The validity of our approach also does not depend on the correctness of the selected model; i.e. it gives valid inferences even when the selected model is incorrect.

    Joint work with Jason Lee, Qiang Liu, Dennis Sun, Jonathan Taylor


    Biography: Yuekai is a fifth year Ph.D. student at Stanford University, advised by Michael Saunders in the operations research group and Jonathan Taylor in the statistics department. His research interests span high-dimensional statistics, machine learning, and mathematical optimization. He received his B.A. in 2010 from Rice University. Outside of school, he is an avid cyclist with the Stanford cycling team.


    Host: Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    More Information: SEMINAR-Sun.doc

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Georgia Lum

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  • CS Colloquium: Lydia E. Kavraki (Rice University) - Reasoning for Complex Physical Systems

    Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Lydia E. Kavraki, Rice University

    Talk Title: Reasoning for Complex Physical Systems

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Robots are rapidly evolving from simple instruments for repetitive tasks to increasingly sophisticated machines capable of performing challenging operations in our daily environment. As they make their way out of custom-made workspaces in factories, algorithms that integrate task and motion planning are needed to enable robots to autonomously execute high-level tasks. This talk will describe a novel framework for the synthesis of motion plans using specifications expressed in temporal logics and sampling-based motion planners. The power and extensibility of the framework has led to algorithmic advances for analyzing the motion and function of proteins, the worker molecules of all cells. The talk will conclude by discussing robotics-inspired methods for computing the flexibility of proteins and large macromolecular complexes with the ultimate goals of deciphering molecular function and aiding the discovery of new therapeutics.

    The lecture will be available to stream HERE.

    Biography: Lydia E. Kavraki is the Noah Harding Professor of Computer Science and Bioengineering at Rice University. Kavraki received her B.A. in Computer Science from the University of Crete in Greece and her Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University. Her research contributions are in physical algorithms and their applications in robotics, as well as in computational structural biology and biomedicine. Kavraki has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed journal and conference publications and a co-author of the popular robotics textbook "Principles of Robot Motion" published by MIT Press. She is heavily involved in the development of The Open Motion Planning Library, which is used in industry and in academic research in robotics and medicine. Kavraki is a Fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery, a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. She was recently recognized with the Women in Science Award from BioHouston.

    Host: Computer Science Department

    Webcast: https://bluejeans.com/88954407

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    WebCast Link: https://bluejeans.com/889544076

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Energy Informatics Distinguished Seminar

    Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Yale Patt, University of Texas at Austin

    Talk Title: Parallelism: A serious goal or a silly mantra (...and what about the End of the Von Neumann Architecture)

    Series: Distinguished Lecture Series in Energy Informatics

    Abstract: The microprocessor of 2025 will have two things going for it: more than 50 billion transistors on each chip and an opportunity to properly harness the transformation hierarchy. We hear a lot about the parallelism that one will get from those 50 billion transistors. In fact, almost everyone in the computer industry these days seems to be promoting parallelism, whether or not they have any clue whatsoever as to what they are talking about. And, many also are announcing the demise of the Von Neumann Architecture, whether or not they have any idea what the Von Neumann architecture is. Both pronouncements are due in large part to the highly visible and well advertised continuing (temporarily) benefits of Moore's Law, manifest by more and more cores on a chip, as well as more and more accelerators on the chip. More transistors means more cores, which translates into more opportunity for parallelism. More transistors also means more opportunity to build the wildest of accelerators, touted as non-Von Neumann architecture. By 2025, we will clearly have more than 1000 cores on a chip -- whether we can effectively utilize them or not does not seem to curb the enthusiasm. And by 2025, we will also have lots of powerful accelerators. But without Von Neumann, they won't be of much use. What I would like to do today is examine parallelism, note that it did not start with the multicore chip, observe some of the silliness it has recently generated, identify its fundamental pervasive element, and discuss some of the problems that have surfaced due to its major enabler, Moore's Law. I would also like to try to show how the transformation hierarchy, without any observable fanfare, can turn the bad news of Moore's Law into good news, both for all those cores and for all those non-Von Neumann accelerators, and play an important role in the microprocessor of 2025.

    Biography: Yale N. Patt is Professor of ECE and the Ernest Cockrell, Jr. Centennial Chair in Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. He continues to thrive on teaching both the large (400+ students) freshman introductory course in computing and advanced graduate courses in microarchitecture, directing the research of eight PhD students, and consulting in the microprocessor industry. Some of his research ideas (e.g., HPS, the two-level branch predictor, ACMP) have ended up in the cutting-edge chips of Intel, AMD, etc. and some of his teaching ideas have resulted in his motivated bottom-up approach for introducing computing to serious students. The textbook for his unconventional approach, "Introduction to Computing Systems: from bits and gates to C and beyond," co-authored with Prof. Sanjay Jeram Patel of Illinois (McGraw-Hill, 2nd ed. 2004), has been adopted by more than 100 universities world-wide. He has received the highest honors in his field for both his reasearch (the 1996 IEEE/ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award) and teaching (the 2000 ACM Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award). He was the inaugural recipient of the recently established IEEE Computer Society Bob Rau Award in 2011, and was named the 2013 recipient of the IEEE Harry Goode Award. He is a Fellow of both IEEE and ACM, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. More detail can be found on his web page www.ece.utexas.edu/~patt.

    Host: Prof. Viktor Prasanna and the Ming Hsieh Institute

    Webcast: https://bluejeans.com/27538199

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    WebCast Link: https://bluejeans.com/275381990

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Annie Yu

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  • Seminar Series

    Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Anuradha Annaswamy , MIT Mechanical Engineering

    Talk Title: Decision and Control in Energy Cyber Physical Systems

    Abstract: Any physical system with a rudimentary level of complexity includes interaction with a cyber structure that helps, monitors, predicts, or manages its function. As the level of complexity increases, this interaction between the cyber and physical components needs to be specific, systematic, nuanced, and robust. The field of study that pertains to these interactions, collectively known as
    Cyber Physical Systems (CPS), is an emerging topic of significant attention both nationally and
    globally. Several areas in science and technology including transportation, healthcare, energy generation and distribution, and manufacturing automation are witnessing significant research activities related to CPS. Our laboratory has focused on a key area in CPS, pertaining to fundamental decision and control tools for Smart Grid, an ideal example of a physical world interacting with the
    cyberworld of computations and communications through control. The challenges due to increased
    penetration of renewables, combined presence of uncertainties in both the cyber and physical world,
    complexities due to the simultaneous control of several applications, limited resources, and complex
    platform architectures, and stringent performance specifications have led us to the development of
    novel methodologies. In this talk, I will present the underpinnings of such methods in energy CPS,
    examples, and recent results.

    Biography: Dr. Anuradha Annaswamy received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Yale
    University in 1985. She has been a member of the faculty at Yale, Boston University, and MIT where
    currently she is the director of the Active Adaptive Control Laboratory and a Senior Research Scientist
    in the Department of Mechanical
    Engineering. Her research interests pertain to adaptive control theory and applications to aerospace
    and automotive control, active control of noise in thermofluid systems, control of autonomous
    systems, decision and control in smart grids, smart cities, and critical infrastructures, and codesign of
    control and platform architectures in cyber physical systems.
    Dr. Annaswamy has received several awards including the George Axelby and Control Systems
    Magazine best paper awards from the IEEE Control Systems Society, the Presidential Young
    Investigator award from the National Science Foundation, the Hans Fisher Senior Fellowship from the
    Institute for Advanced Study at the Technische Universität München in 2008, and the Donald Groen
    Julius Prize for 2008 from the Institute of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Annaswamy is a Fellow of the
    IEEE and a member of AIAA.
    Dr. Annaswamy is an active member of the IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS) and the American
    Automatic Control Council. She was a nominated and elected member of the CSS Board of Governors
    for 1993 and 2010 to 2012, respectively. She was a Program Chair of the American Control
    Conference (ACC) during 2003, General Chair of the 2008 ACC, and Program Chair for the 2nd
    Virtual Control Conference on Smart Grid Technology. Currently she is the Vice President for
    Conference Activities in the IEEE CSS Executive Committee.
    Dr. Annaswamy is a co-editor of the IEEE CSS report on Impact of Control Technology: Overview,
    Success Stories, and Research Challenges, 2011 (1st Edition) and 2014 (2nd Edition) along with Tariq
    Samad. She is the project lead on the publication, “Vision for Smart Grid Controls: 2030 and Beyond,”
    (Eds: A.M. Annaswamy, M. Amin, C. DeMarco and T. Samad), 2013.

    Host: Alefiya Hussain and Petros Ioannou

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Alefiya Hussain

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  • CS Colloquium: Sam Malek (George Mason University) - Automated Analysis and Testing of Mobile Software

    Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 04:00 PM - 05:15 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Sam Malek , George Mason University

    Talk Title: Automated Analysis and Testing of Mobile Software

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: App markets have fundamentally changed the way software is delivered to consumers, especially in the mobile domain. By providing a medium for reaching a large consumer base at a nominal cost, app markets have made it possible for small entrepreneurs to compete against prominent software companies. At the same time, since many of the entrepreneurs do not have the resources to employ proper software engineering practices, many apps provisioned on the markets are riddled with defects that not only inconvenience the users, but also easily exploited by attackers for nefarious purposes. In this talk, I first outline the architectural root cause of some of the security vulnerabilities found in Android. Afterwards, I describe a combination of static and dynamic program analysis techniques aimed at detecting such issues. Experimental evaluation of the tools realizing these techniques using real-world apps has been promising, resulting in their adoption for use by government and industrial collaborators. Finally, I conclude the talk with an outline of future research directions.

    Biography: Sam Malek is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at George Mason University. His general research interests are in the field of software engineering, and to date his focus has spanned the areas of software architecture, autonomic computing, software security, and software analysis and testing. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees from the Computer Science Department at the University of Southern California and his B.S. degree in Information and Computer Science from the University of California Irvine. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award, GMU Emerging Researcher/Scholar/Creator award, and GMU Computer Science Department Outstanding Faculty Research Award. Malek is also a member of the DARPA’s Computer Science Study Group. He is currently serving on the editorial board of the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering and the Springer Journal of Computing.

    Host: Neno Medvidovic

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • E-Week Featured Speaker: Facebook

    Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Come here from USC alum Jonathan Mooser about his journey from USC to Facebook!

    RSVP online at bit.ly/eweekfb2015

    Location: Waite Phillips Hall Of Education (WPH) - B28

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Christine D'Arcy

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  • Tesla Information Session

    Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 06:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Services

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Tesla Motors offers compelling opportunities for students seeking internships and co-ops. To be eligible, you must be actively pursuing a technical BS, MS, or advanced degree. Your application will be considered for all applicable opportunities in Palo Alto, CA and Fremont, CA.

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: All Viterbi

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Services

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  • MATLAB seminar for educators, academic researchers and students at University of Southern California

    Fri, Feb 27, 2015 @ 10:00 AM - 03:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Please join MathWorks for a complimentary MATLAB seminar for educators, academic researchers and students at University of Southern California.

    Event features two technical sessions presented by a MathWorks Application Engineer (and USC Alumni): Abhijit Bhattacharjee.


    Session One: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Please arrive 15 minutes early to sign-in. Walk-ins are welcome.)
    Top 10 Productivity Tools in MATLAB
    Learn tips and best practices for exploring, analyzing and visualizing your data in MATLAB. We will present and discuss ways to increase your productivity and effectiveness using MATLAB.

    12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. lunch will be served

    Session two: 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. (Please arrive 15 minutes early to sign-in. Walk-ins are welcome.)
    Speeding Up MATLAB Applications
    Learn ways to improve and optimize your code that can boost the execution speed of your application.


    View the complete session description and register at: http://www.mathworks.com/USC/Feb2015 /a>

    More Information: Poster USC.pdf

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - Auditorium

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Viterbi IT

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  • Biomedical Engineering Seminar

    Fri, Feb 27, 2015 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Eunji Chung-Yoo, Ph.D., Research Associate at the Institute for Molecular Engineering University of Chicago

    Talk Title: Molecular Engineering for Regenerative Medicine and Theranostic Applications”

    Abstract:
    University of Southern California
    Biomedical Engineering Seminar


    “Molecular Engineering for Regenerative Medicine and Theranostic Applications”

    by,

    Eunji Chung-Yoo, Ph.D.



    Research Associate at the Institute for Molecular Engineering
    University of Chicago



    Thursday, February 26, 2015
    11:00 AM in RTH 109 (Ronald Tutor Hall)


    Abstract:
    When designing bioactive materials to direct desired outcomes for regenerative medicine, the appropriate structural and functional properties at relevant hierarchical levels, including molecular, cellular, and tissue levels, must be taken into account. Furthermore, just as important is the intentional design of the biomaterial to be practical for the clinical setting, complementing available surgical techniques and emerging healthcare technology, while remaining safe and cost-effective. Biodegradable polymers, whether synthetic or natural, can act synergistically with self-assembly to design multi-dimensional, biomimetic biomaterials to address clinical needs. I will present how citric acid-based elastomers and nanocomposites can be tailored to meet a versatile range of materials properties that are optimal for use as implants for both soft and hard tissue regeneration. Parameters such as polymerization conditions, mechanical properties, surface architecture, and the particulate phase can alter the cellular and tissue response and thus be used to guide specific outcomes.
    In addition to surgical implants, through the use of self-assembly, polymers can be used to complement minimally-invasive procedures. Specifically, I will present how natural polymers such as proteins and sugars can form bioactive interfaces such as membranes and encapsulating structures for adhesives and applications in 3-D printing. Moreover, through the rational design of peptide amphiphile micelles, multifunctional nanoparticle systems that can target, diagnose, and treat a variety of diseases including atherosclerosis and cancer will be presented. Taken together, molecular engineering has the potential to address limitations in clinical solutions and generate novel strategies that can deliver molecular signals to report back on or influence the behavior of the cellular niche, or regenerate complex tissues that is required of hierarchically-ordered organs.

    Host: Biomedical Engineering

    More Information: image.jpg

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 109

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Colloquium

    Fri, Feb 27, 2015 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Mark Setrakian, Independent Roboticist

    Talk Title: The Importance of Extracurricular Interests and Passions: Music and Fighting Robots

    Host: W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Program

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Jeffrey Teng

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  • Spring 2015 Environmental Engineering Seminar Series

    Fri, Feb 27, 2015 @ 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Jim Mihelcic, University of South Florida

    Talk Title: Envisioning a Better World: The Making of Community and Globally Impactful Engineers

    Host: Katie Russo

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Kaela Berry

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  • Integrated Systems Seminar

    Fri, Feb 27, 2015 @ 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Tim LaRocca, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems

    Talk Title: TBD

    Series: Integrated Systems Seminar

    Host: Hosted by Prof. Hossein Hashemi, Prof. Mike Chen, and Prof. Mahta Moghaddam Organized and hosted by Run Chen

    More Info: http://mhi.usc.edu/events/event-details/?event_id=915366

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Elise Herrera-Green

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Fri, Feb 27, 2015 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Jim Mihelcic, University of South Florida

    Talk Title: Envisioning a Better World: The Making of Community and Globally Impactful Engineers

    Abstract: Welcome to the vision, a world where all have access to sanitation, potable water, and safe indoor air; where all children are able to learn in well built classrooms; where families no longer suffer from disease, starvation, and poverty; where renewable energy has replaced fossil fuels and engineers are part of the solution. In this talk Professor Mihelcic will provide his vision of training globally competent scientists and engineers, and also show what a water, sanitation, & hygiene (WASH) engineer does in a developing world setting. He will conclude by telling the story behind the cover of his book: Field Guide in Environmental Engineering for Development Workers: Water, Sanitation, Indoor Air and Environmental Engineering: Fundamentals, Sustainability, Design (ASCE Press, 2009) which includes a forward by President Jimmy Carter.



    Biography: Dr. Mihelcic is director of an EPA-funded National Research Center for nutrient management and the Peace Corps Master’s International Program in CEE, which allows students to combine their graduate studies with service and research in the Peace Corps as water/sanitation engineers. His teaching and research interests are centered on sustainability, specifically understanding how global stressors influence water resources, water quality, water reuse and resource recovery, and selection and provision of water supply and sanitation infrastructure. Dr. Mihelcic is a board-certified Environmental Engineering Member, a member of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Chartered Science Advisory Board, past president of the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors, and current Board Trustee with the American Academy of Environmental Engineers & Scientists. He is also the lead author of three textbooks including Environmental Engineering: Fundamentals, Sustainability, Design (John Wiley, 2014) and Field Guide in Environmental Engineering for Development Workers: Water, Sanitation, Indoor Air and Environmental Engineering: Fundamentals, Sustainability, Design (ASCE Press, 2009).


    Host: Dr. Amy Childress

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 124

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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