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Events for the 4th week of October

  • Repeating EventMeet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, and Engineering Talk

    Mon, Oct 23, 2017

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Receptions & Special Events


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process, a student led walking tour of campus, and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. During the engineering session we will discuss the curriculum, research opportunities, hands-on projects, entrepreneurial support programs, and other aspects of the engineering school. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process, and financial aid.

    Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m.

    Please make sure to check availability and register online for the session you wish to attend. Also, remember to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    RSVP

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - USC Admission Office

    Audiences: Prospective Freshmen & Family Members

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    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Oct 23, 2017 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Gilles Gnacadja, Ph.D., Director of Life Sciences Mathematics, Amgen

    Talk Title: Non-Monotone Dose-Response Curves in Receptor Pharmacology

    Host: Stacey Finley, PhD

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Center for Systems and Control (CSC@USC) and Ming Hsieh Institute for Electrical Engineering

    Mon, Oct 23, 2017 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Fabio Pasqualetti, University of California, Riverside

    Talk Title: Synchronization Patterns in Networks of Kuramoto Oscillators: A Network-Theoretic Approach for Analysis and Control

    Series: Fall 2017 Joint CSC@USC/CommNetS-MHI Seminar Series

    Abstract: Synchronized behaviors among the nodes of a network are ubiquitous in nature and in several man-made systems. While some systems require complete synchronization among all the parts to function properly, others rely on cluster or partial synchronization, where subsets of nodes exhibit coherent behaviors that remain independent from the evolution of other nodes in the network. For example, while patterns of partial synchronization have been observed in healthy individuals, complete synchronization in neural systems is often associated with degenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, and epilepsy.

    In this talk, I will present novel network-theoretic methods to predict and control the formation of synchronization patterns within a network of Kuramoto oscillators. I will show that exact patterns of synchronized oscillators are possible if and only if the interconnection structure and the oscillators satisfy certain stringent conditions. On the other hand, approximately synchronized patterns, which often appears in experimental time series, can emerge more easily depending on a graded combination of the interconnection structure and the intrinsic properties of the oscillators. Further, I will present structural control schemes to enforce the emergence of a desired synchronization landscape and, lastly, I will show how the proposed techniques find applicability in a broad class of network analysis and control problems.

    Biography: Fabio Pasqualetti is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside. He completed a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 2012, a Laurea Magistrale degree (M.Sc. equivalent) in Automation Engineering at the University of Pisa, Italy, in 2007, and a Laurea degree (B.Sc. equivalent) in Computer Engineering at the University of Pisa, Italy, in 2004. He received a Young Investigator Program Award from ARO in 2017, and the TCNS Outstanding Paper Award from IEEE CSS in 2016. His main research interest is in secure control systems, with application to multi-agent networks, distributed computing, and power networks. Other interests include computational neuroscience, vehicle routing, and combinatorial optimization, with application to distributed area patrolling and persistent surveillance.


    Host: Ashutosh Nayyar, ashutosh.nayyar@usc.edu

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Gerrielyn Ramos

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  • Schlumberger Info Session

    Mon, Oct 23, 2017 @ 06:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    We invite you to meet with us for an inside look at our Engineering, Research, Operations and Petrotechnical positions. You will have an opportunity to talk one on one with Schlumberger representatives and learn more about who we are and what we do as an Oilfield Services Company. Food and Beverages will be provided!

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: All Viterbi Students

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • CS Colloquium: Rachel Greenstadt (Drexel University) - Using Stylometry to Attribute Programmers and Writers

    Tue, Oct 24, 2017 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Rachel Greenstadt, Drexel University

    Talk Title: Using Stylometry to Attribute Programmers and Writers

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium.

    In this talk, I will discuss my lab's work in the emerging field of adversarial stylometry and machine learning. Machine learning algorithms are increasingly being used in security and privacy domains, in areas that go beyond intrusion or spam detection. For example, in digital forensics, questions often arise about the authors of documents: their identity, demographic background, and whether they can be linked to other documents. The field of stylometry uses linguistic features and machine learning techniques to answer these questions. We have applied stylometry to difficult domains such as underground hacker forums, open source projects (code), and tweets. I will discuss our Doppelgänger Finder algorithm, which enables us to group Sybil accounts on underground forums and detect blogs from Twitter feeds and reddit comments. In addition, I will discuss our work attributing unknown source code and binaries.


    Biography: Dr. Rachel Greenstadt is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Drexel University where she teaches graduate-level courses in computer security, privacy, and machine learning. She founded the Privacy, Security, and Automation Laboratory at Drexel University in 2008. She has attracted a research team of PhD students and undergraduates with interests and expertise in information extraction, machine learning, agents, privacy, trust, and security.

    Dr. Greenstadt's scholarship has been recognized by the privacy research community. She is an alum of the DARPA Computer Science Study Group and a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award. Her work has received the PET Award for Outstanding Research in Privacy Enhancing Technologies and the Andreas Pfitzmann Best Student Paper Award. She currently serves as co-editor-in-chief of the journal Proceedings on Privacy Enhancing Technologies (PoPETs). Her research has been featured in the New York Times, the New Republic, Der Spiegel, and other local and international media outlets.


    Host: Aleksandra Korolova

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Computer Science Department

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  • Navigating the Internship & Job Search- Presented by ITP Faculty Larry Jordan

    Tue, Oct 24, 2017 @ 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Virtually everything you think you know about getting a job/internship is wrong -- especially in the real-world after graduation. Join Larry Jordan for this one-hour session on what you NEED to know to find the job/internship of your dreams.

    Discover how to cope with competition and avoid pitfalls in your job hunt, learn what employers are actually looking for during an interview and get tips on how to negotiate your salary.

    Larry Jordan has hired teams in media and high-tech for more than 40 years. He's part of the ITP Part-Time Faculty Job Search committee and has run his own business for more than 20 years. He also teaches ITP-211 and ITP-411. This is his favorite lecture from his award-winning course.

    This will be one of the most valuable hours you spend this entire year.

    Pizza will be provided!

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: All Viterbi Students

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Lam Research Corporation Info Session

    Tue, Oct 24, 2017 @ 06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Discover opportunity on a whole new scale.
    Stop by our Information Session to find out how to build a successful career starting with an atom.

    Creating today's computer chips requires the utmost precision on a scale so small, it's hard to comprehend. Yet that's where our Atom Engineers shine.

    At Lam, we are all Atom Engineers. Whether you're in operations, supply chain management, or customer support; whether you're an engineer, a technician, or a specialist; whether you're a senior leader or recent grad, you're helping our customers manipulate the tiny building blocks of atoms and move the world.

    Event: Tech Talk with Lam
    Date: October 24, 2017
    Time: 6 pm
    Location: TBA
    Speaker: Aaron Fellis, VP Deposition

    Join us and help power the components that empower everything.

    We're looking for talented thinkers who understand that a single atom can make a world of difference. If you're interested in pursuing a career in any of the following areas, we should talk:

    Chemistry, Engineering Chemical, Computer, Electrical, Industrial, Manufacturing, Mechanical, Finance, Human Resources, Information Systems, Management Information Systems, Marketing, Materials Science, Physics, Plasma Physics, Software Development and Engineering, and Supply Chain.

    Learn more and apply at www.lamresearch.com/careers.

    Location: SGM 101

    Audiences: All Viterbi

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Repeating EventMeet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, and Engineering Talk

    Wed, Oct 25, 2017

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Receptions & Special Events


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process, a student led walking tour of campus, and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. During the engineering session we will discuss the curriculum, research opportunities, hands-on projects, entrepreneurial support programs, and other aspects of the engineering school. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process, and financial aid.

    Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m.

    Please make sure to check availability and register online for the session you wish to attend. Also, remember to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    RSVP

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - USC Admission Office

    Audiences: Prospective Freshmen & Family Members

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    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • Upper Airway Dynamic Imaging During Awake and Asleep Tidal Breathing

    Wed, Oct 25, 2017 @ 01:30 AM - 02:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Chantal Darquenne, PhD, Professor, Dept. of Medicine University of California, San Diego

    Talk Title: Upper Airway Dynamic Imaging During Awake and Asleep Tidal Breathing

    Series: Medical Imaging Seminar Series

    Abstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent partial or complete airway closure during sleep, and has important clinical implications ranging from disruption of sleep with daytime sequelae of excessive sleepiness and poor quality of life to adverse cardiovascular or metabolic outcomes. While polysomnography and studies based on measurements of airway pressures and resistance have provided a wealth of information on upper airway physiology, they are unable to assess the three- dimensional anatomy of the upper airway and its conformational changes during breathing. Knowledge of the morphology and mechanical behavior of this structure is essential for a more complete understanding of the occurrence of upper airway obstruction. Such information can be obtained with imaging technology and will be the focus of this seminar.Data will be presented from a group of OSA subjects and a group of age- and BMI-matched healthy controls that underwent MR imaging to assess upper airway morphometry and changes in airway size during tidal breathing. Data were collected both during wakefulness and natural sleep with simultaneous measurement of nasal-oral flow partition and sleep state and stages. Results show significant differences in the magnitude of the changes in upper airway size over a tidal breath between OSA subjects and controls both during wakefulness and natural sleep suggesting that, for tidal breathing conditions, dynamic OSA imaging during wakefulness is representative of behavior during sleep.

    Biography: Chantal Darquenne is a Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the President-elect of the International Society for Aerosols in Medicine. She earned her Ph.D. degree in Applied Sciences from the Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium) in 1995. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Division of Physiology at UCSD where she still holds her current position. Her laboratory uses an interdisciplinary approach combining engineering principles and lung physiology concepts to address her primary research interests that focus on aerosol transport and deposition in the lung, on lung ventilation inhomogeneities in health and disease, and more recently on upper airway dynamics in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Host: Professor Krishna Nayak

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia White

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  • Center for Cyber-Physical Systems and Internet of Things and Ming Hsieh Institute for Electrical Engineering Joint Seminar Series on Cyber-Physical Systems

    Wed, Oct 25, 2017 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Thomas Wahl, Northeastern University

    Talk Title: Stabilizing Numeric Programs against Platform Uncertainties

    Abstract: Floating-point arithmetic (FPA) is a loosely standardized approximation of real arithmetic available on many computers today, and widely employed in cyber-physical systems. The use of approximation incurs commonly underestimated risks for the reliability of numeric software, including reproducibility issues caused by the relatively large degree of freedom for FPA implementers offered by the IEEE 754 floating-point standard. If left untreated, such problems can seriously interfere with program portability and simply our trust in numeric results.

    In this talk I discuss numeric programs' lack of robustness against platform variations, including irreproducible control flow and invariants that hold on some platforms but not others. I also demonstrate how such reproducibility violations can be repaired with low impact on performance, which results in a more stable program execution. I illustrate the use of our techniques both on decision-making and on purely numeric programs, and present an outlook to its applicability to addressing reproducibility issues among CPU and GPU versions of kernel support vector machines. Much of this is joint work with Miriam Leeser at Northeastern University, as well as our respective students.


    Biography: Thomas Wahl joined the faculty of Northeastern University in 2011. He moved to Boston from Oxford/United Kingdom, where he was a Research Officer in the Computing Laboratory (now Department of Computer Science). Prior to the Oxford experience, Wahl held a postdoctoral position at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. He obtained a PhD degree in Computer Science from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007.

    Wahl's research concerns the reliability of complex computing systems. Two domains notorious for their fragility are concurrency and numerical computing. With colleagues, Wahl has developed leading algorithms and techniques for the automated analysis of concurrent software, such as multi-threaded or data-parallel programs, using rigorous formal techniques, which are able to track down deep and unintuitive program bugs. He has also investigated how floating-point arithmetic can "hijack" a program's computation when run on non-standard architectures, such as heterogeneous and custom-made embedded platforms.


    Host: Paul Bogdan

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Estela Lopez

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  • Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering Seminar

    Wed, Oct 25, 2017 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Adam Steinberg, Associate Professor/University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies

    Talk Title: Thermoacoustic Dynamics in Aeronautical Gas Turbine Combustors

    Abstract: Thermoacoustic instability in combustion systems refers to the tendency for small perturbations to grow into sustained high-amplitude oscillations, driven by feedback between heat release and pressure dynamics. This seminar will explore various aspects of thermoacoustic instabilities that were studied experimentally in a practical aeronautical gas turbine combustor using optical measurement techniques. Specific challenges arising in the application of optical diagnostics to high-pressure, liquid-fueled combustors will be addressed. We then will discuss two types of thermoacoustic behavior. The first involves apparently spontaneous increases and decreases in oscillation amplitude that occurred at particular operating points. The second pertains to conditions exhibiting steady and intense oscillations, but with extreme sensitivity between the operating point and oscillation amplitude. Both of these behaviors can be explained using the experimental data. Such insights help guide engine designers to more robust systems, and provide important information regarding the application of computational fluid dynamics simulations to thermoacoustically oscillating combustion systems.

    Biography: Adam Steinberg is an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, where he holds a Canada Research Chair (Tier II) in Turbulent Reactive Flows. His research focuses on the application of laser-based measurement techniques to solve problems in fundamental and applied thermo-fluids, with particular emphasis on aerospace and power generation systems. He obtained his PhD from the University of Michigan in 2009, and worked at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) before joining the University of Toronto in 2011. He is the recipient of the inaugural Hiroshi Tsuji Early Career Research Award from the Combustion Institute, as well as several other distinctions. He is a member of the Editorial Board of Combustion and Flame and the AIAA Propellants and Combustion Technical Committee, and is a Colloquium Co-Chair for the International Symposium on Combustion.

    Host: Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Ashleen Knutsen

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  • Sony Pictures Tech Talk

    Wed, Oct 25, 2017 @ 05:30 PM - 06:30 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Come learn about Sony Pictures Broader Vision of Cyber Security as well as their most recent Technologies & Incident Response

    Dinner will be provided!

    Hosted by Viterbi Student Engagement & Career Connections & USC Cyber security & Forensics Org. (CYBORG)

    More Information: SonyTechTalkFlyer.png

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: CSCI, CECS, CSGames, CSBA

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • The FDA in Medical Device Industry w/ Medtronic

    Wed, Oct 25, 2017 @ 07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Organizations

    Student Activity


    Have you heard professors and seasoned upperclassmen throw around phrases like "510K" and "PMA" and wondered what the heck they were talking about? Or perhaps this is the first time you've heard those terms. As it turns out, you've stumbled upon a very important topic that every engineer who aspires to work in medical device industry should know about: FDA regulation. Fret not people, for we are here to help you navigate this tricky subject. ASBME and our friends at MEDesign are proud to host USC/ASBME alumni Lauren Donahue for a discussion on FDA regulation and how it affects her life as an engineer at Medtronic! Did we mention there's also going to be free food? Oh yeah, that too.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - 227

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Associated Students of Biomedical Engineering

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  • Causal Inference in Complex Networks

    Thu, Oct 26, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Negar Kiyavash, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Talk Title: Causal Inference in Complex Networks

    Abstract: One of the paramount challenges of this century is that of understanding complex, dynamic, large-scale networks. Such high-dimensional networks, including social, financial, and biological networks, cover the planet and dominate modern life. In this talk, we propose novel approaches to inference in such networks, for both active (interventional) and passive (observational) learning scenarios. We highlight how timing could be utilized as a degree of freedom that provides rich information about the dynamics. This information allows resolving direction of causation even when only a subset of the nodes is observed (latent setting). In the presence of large data, we propose algorithms that identify optimal or near-optimal approximations to the topology of the network.

    Biography: Negar Kiyavash is Willett Faculty Scholar at the University of Illinois and a joint Associate Professor of Industrial and Enterprise Engineering (IE) and Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE). She is the director of Advance Data Analytics Program in IE and is further affiliated with the Coordinated Science Laboratory (CSL) and the Information Trust Institute. She received her Ph.D. degree in ECE from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2006. Her research interests are in design and analysis of algorithms for network inference and security. She is a recipient of NSF CAREER and AFOSR YIP awards and the Illinois College of Engineering Dean's Award for Excellence in Research.

    Host: Urbashi Mitra, ubli@usc.edu, EEB 536, x04667

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Gerrielyn Ramos

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  • Fred S. Grodins Keynote Lecture

    Thu, Oct 26, 2017 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Na Ji, PhD, Associate Professor Departments of Physics and Molecular Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley

    Talk Title: Probing neural circuits with shaped light

    Series: Annual Grodins Keynote Lecture

    Abstract: To understand computation in the brain, one needs to understand the input-output relationships for neural circuits and the anatomical and functional relationships between individual neurons therein. Optical microscopy has emerged as an ideal tool in this quest, as it is capable of recording the activity of neurons distributed over millimeter dimensions with sub-micron spatial resolution. I will describe how we use concepts in astronomy and optics to develop next-generation microscopy methods for imaging neural circuits at higher resolution, greater depth, and faster speed. By shaping the wavefront of the light, we have achieved synapse-level spatial resolution through the entire depth of primary visual cortex, optimized microendoscopes for imaging deeply buried nuclei, and developed a video-rate (30 Hz) volumetric imaging method. We apply these methods to understanding neural circuits, using the mouse primary visual cortex as our model system.

    Biography: Na Ji studied chemistry and physics as an undergraduate in the University of Science and Technology of China, then pursued her graduate degree at the University of California Berkeley. In 2006, she moved to Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, where she worked with Eric Betzig on improving the speed and resolution of in vivo brain imaging. She started her own group in Janelia in 2011, where, in addition to imaging technology development, her lab applies the resulting techniques to outstanding problems in neurobiology. Na Ji, PhD, is currently at Associate Professor in the Department of Physics and Department of Molecular Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley.

    Host: Department of Biomedical Engineering; Reception will be held at the Andrus Gerontology Courtyard from 4:00 pm to 5:30 pm.

    More Information: Grodins Template_FINAL_BGedits.pdf

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • CAIS Seminar: Dr. Sze-Chuan Suen (University of Southern California) - A POMDP Model for Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Screening

    Thu, Oct 26, 2017 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Sze-Chuan Suen, University of Southern California

    Talk Title: A POMDP Model for Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Screening

    Series: Center for AI in Society (CAIS) Seminar Series

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium.

    Patients with drug resistant disease may need different treatment than those with drug-sensitive disease. However, identifying these patients may be difficult since tests to determine disease strain may be time consuming or costly. In this project, we develop a model using POMDP and simulation techniques to identify when and which first-line tuberculosis patients are most likely at risk for drug resistance and should be screened to reduce costs and increase health outcomes.


    Biography: Sze-Chuan Suen received her PhD in the department of Management Science and Engineering from Stanford University in 2016. Her research interests include developing applied mathematical models to identify epidemiological trends and evaluate health policies to support informed decision-making. Her research draws from techniques in simulation, dynamic systems modeling, optimization, and decision analysis.


    Host: Milind Tambe

    Location: Seeley Wintersmith Mudd Memorial Hall (of Philosophy) (MHP) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Computer Science Department

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  • SpaceX Info Session

    Thu, Oct 26, 2017 @ 05:30 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Information Session and Resume Review

    Location: SGM 101

    Audiences: All Viterbi

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Professor Lotfi Zadeh Father of Fuzzy Logic Memorial

    Thu, Oct 26, 2017 @ 05:30 PM - 07:30 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Receptions & Special Events


    Agenda
    5:30 Welcome
    5:45 Memory of Professor Zadeh
    6:00 USC Thornton performance
    6:30 Refreshment Break
    6:50 Impact of Fuzzy Logic on Science and Engineering
    7:20 Professor Zadeh and Fanni Reunion
    7:30 Conclusion

    More Information: LotfiZadehFlyer_S_P.pdf

    Location: Montgomery Ross Fisher Building (school Of Social Work) (MRF) - 340

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Juli Legat

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  • Meet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, and Engineering Talk

    Fri, Oct 27, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Receptions & Special Events


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process, a student led walking tour of campus, and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. During the engineering session we will discuss the curriculum, research opportunities, hands-on projects, entrepreneurial support programs, and other aspects of the engineering school. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process, and financial aid.

    Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m.

    Please make sure to check availability and register online for the session you wish to attend. Also, remember to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    RSVP

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - USC Admission Office

    Audiences: Prospective Freshmen & Family Members

    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • Towards Fully Flexible Energy Autonomous Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks

    Fri, Oct 27, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Hans-Peter Bernhard, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria Institute for Communications Engineering and RF-Systems

    Talk Title: Towards Fully Flexible Energy Autonomous Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks

    Abstract: Wireless communication links in industrial environments are gradually replacing wired solutions. This transition offers more flexibility and enables new technologies and applications to arise. However for industrial monitoring tasks, currently available wireless standards do not meet all requirements, and depending on the application, different standards have to be used. In this overview, results from the European research project Dependable Embedded Wireless Infrastructure (DEWI) are presented, which led to the development of a new highly flexible wireless protocol. The degree of flexibility of the protocol not only allows to meet various requirements in industrial monitoring, but also to cover communication needs of the entire operation cycle of sensor nodes. Additionally, to enable a maximum degree of freedom, it is designed to operate energy autonomously with a strictly limited power budget imposed by energy harvesting. Aside of all theses requirements, synchronized sampling is a very important topic in industrial measurement environments using hundreds of sensors. We show the use of a \alpha\epsilon-modulator to synchronize the nodes within a wireless sensor network. This is a new method to achieve long term synchronization, also during long offline periods, with least possible short term sampling jitter. Closely related to synchronization is clock frequency estimation. Without a highly accurate estimated clock, network synchronization won't work. But, in wireless systems or harsh environments, it is likely that clock events can be missed and, therefore, the observed process has to be treated as a sparse periodic process. To parameterize the clock, current research is applying periodogram estimators at a complexity of at least O(N log N). Here a highly accurate iterative frequency estimator for pulse signals with low computational complexity is shown. It is an unbiased estimator with a complexity of O(N). Furthermore, the mean square error (MSE) of this new efficient approach is proportional to O(N_3) and thus as accurate as periodogram or frequency domain based methods. The talk concludes with a short review and an outline of ongoing and future research in highly flexible wireless sensor networks.


    Biography: He received the Dipl.-Ing. (M.Sc.) degree in communication engineering and the Dr. techn. (Ph.D.) degree with distinction from Vienna Technical University in 1991 and 1997, respectively.

    From 1985 to 1992 he worked for different companies in the area of database and organizational programming. From 1992 to 1998 he was with the Institute for Communications and Radio Frequency Engineering at the Technical University Vienna as a research assistant and became in 1994 assistant professor at this institute. From 1997 on he started teaching at HTBLA-Steyr. In 1999 he joined the Institute for Communications Engineering and RF-Systems, Johannes Kepler University Linz, as a lecturer and he currently holds a senior researcher position at this institute. He was guest researcher with the Institute for Information Theory and Automation, Academy of Sciences Prague and with the University of Cambridge UK, Engineering Department, Inst. f. Vision Speech and Robotics. Starting in 2004 he served as consultant for several companies as there are Infineon, DICE (Danube Integrated Circuit Engineering GmbH & Co KG), and others. In 2007 he founded a scientific consulting company with focus on assisting handicapped persons and nonprofit health care organizations. He is holding patents in the field of computer science and computer assisting systems for handicapped persons. He has contributed to the following research projects "Nonlinear Methods in Speech processing", "Assisting Handicapped Persons in Computer Handling" and he supervised the research project "Information Theoretic Methods for Load Curve Prediction" in collaboration with SIEMENS power grid department. From 2014 to 2017 he worked also with the European ARTEMIS project DEWI (Dependable Embedded Wireless Infrastructure) focussed on energy efficient sensing, signal processing and communication. Currently he is involved in the joint undertaking of Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership (ECSEL) on Secure Connected Trustable Things (SCOTT) as a senior scientist. His research interests include algorithm design for wireless communications with a special focus on synchronization, security and energy efficient protocols.

    Hans-Peter Bernhard received the GIT-Award in 1991, in the year 2000 he was awarded with the innovation award of Upper Austrian government and he was Austrian representative at the Novartis International Science Week Switzerland with the best Austrian education project in health care. Hans-Peter Bernhard is an IEEE senior member and member of the signal processing society.


    Host: Urbashi Mitra, ubli@usc.edu, EEB 536, x04667

    Location: 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Gerrielyn Ramos

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  • ASBME: Social 3: Tour of Terror

    Fri, Oct 27, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Organizations

    Student Activity


    Join ASBME for our next social event as we explore Zombie Joe's Haunted Halloween theatrical attraction- a terrifying URBAN DEATH maze of inexplicable horrors, unfathomable monstrosities, and the disturbed spirits that walk among us (http://www.urbandeath.com/)! The event is Friday, October 27th and we will be leaving from Tommy Trojan at 8:30pm. Tickets are $15 and depending on how many drivers sign up we may have to split some uber fares. Sign-up quickly as spots are limited: http://bit.ly/2yy0l6r

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Associated Students of Biomedical Engineering

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  • W.V.T. RUSCH ENGINEERING HONORS COLLOQUIU

    Fri, Oct 27, 2017 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: TBA, TBA

    Talk Title: TBA

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Su Stevens

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. Seminar

    Fri, Oct 27, 2017 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Luis Montoya and Seyedpouyan Hosseinialiabad, Astani CEE Graduate Students

    Talk Title: Understanding Properties of Extreme Ocean Wave Runup and Analysis and Control of Signalized Arterial Networks

    Abstract: In recent history sneaker waves or king waves in Australia, also referred in this study as extreme infragravity EIG waves, have been responsible for killing many people throughout the world. Particularly so on the coast of Oregon, where more than 21 people have died since the year 1990 due to this phenomenon. These extreme runup events may also result in coastal flooding, beach erosion, damage to coastal structures and damage to marine vessels. In this study, the main objective is to better understand EIG waves and EIG wave runup during storms. It is revealed that the input spectrum frequency resolution plays an important role when studying IG waves and runup. Also, it is shown that there is an ideal frequency resolution which can make the modeling part more accurate and efficient by capturing most of the low frequency energy transfers during the nonlinear wave interactions. It is established that runup predictions from numerical simulations that use 10 frequencies in the input energy spectrum are not the same from those that use 100 frequencies because of nonlinearity. It is established that extreme runup is therefore affected by frequency resolution and convergence can be achieved using the fine resolution. For high energy wave conditions, with beaches that have IG-dominated runup, in order to get numerically convergent predictions of 0.0001-0.00005 Hz is needed. This is more than 100 times smaller than what is typically used in these Boussinesq coastal phase-resolving models.


    Talk Title: Analysis and Control of Signalized Arterial Networks

    In this study, we first focus on queue length analysis of urban traffic networks. We consider traffic flow dynamics for a network of signalized intersections, where the outflow from every link is constrained to be equal to a given capacity function if the queue length is positive, and equal to the minimum of cumulative inflow and capacity function otherwise. In spite of the resulting dynamics being discontinuous, recent work has proved existence and uniqueness of the resulting queue length trajectory if the inter-link travel times are strictly bounded away from zero. We provide an alternate framework to obtain queue length trajectories by direct simulation of delay differential equations, where link outflows are obtained from the provably unique solution to a linear program. Existence and uniqueness of the solution to the proposed model for traffic flow dynamics is established for piecewise constant external inflow and capacity functions. Additionally, if the external inflow and capacity functions are periodic and satisfy a stability condition, then there exists a globally attractive periodic orbit. We provide an iterative procedure to compute this periodic orbit. A periodic trajectory is iteratively updated for every link based on updates to a specific time instant when its queue length transitions from being zero to being positive. The resulting iterates are shown to converge uniformly monotonically to the desired periodic orbit. Illustrative simulation results are presented. In the second part of this study, we focus on control techniques for signalized arterial networks. We study the throughput of arterial network under specific type of adaptive controller, namely Proportionally Fair, and traditional Fixed-time controllers. This comparison is done both in terms of theoretical upper bounds and the empirical values calculated from microscopic traffic simulations.



    Location: Von Kleinsmid Center For International & Public Affairs (VKC) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • MESA College and Career Day

    Sat, Oct 28, 2017 @ 08:00 AM - 02:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering STEM Educational Outreach Programs

    Receptions & Special Events


    College and Career Exploration Day is a partnership with California MESA and STEM-EOP which invites approximately 1100 middle and high school students from Southern California as well as their parents and teachers come to USC to learn about majoring STEM fields by meeting college representatives, participating in workshops, viewing exhibits and demonstrations, attending presentations and engaging in real-world science and engineering projects, experiments and activities.

    Location: Von Kleinsmid Center For International & Public Affairs (VKC) -

    Audiences: Middle and high school students

    Posted By: Darin Gray/Viterbi STEM Educational Outreach

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