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Events for February 19, 2020

  • Repeating EventMeet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, and Engineering Talk

    Wed, Feb 19, 2020

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Workshops & Infosessions


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen (HS seniors and younger) and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process, a student led walking tour of campus, and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. During the engineering session we will discuss the curriculum, research opportunities, hands-on projects, entrepreneurial support programs, and other aspects of the engineering school. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process, and financial aid.

    Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m.

    Please make sure to check availability and register online for the session you wish to attend. Also, remember to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    Register Here

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) -

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

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    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • Interviews Open Forum

    Wed, Feb 19, 2020 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Increase your preparedness for interviews by attending this professional development Q&A moderated by Viterbi Career Connections staff or Viterbi employer partners.
    For more information about Labs & Open Forums, please visit viterbicareers.usc.edu/workshops.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: All Viterbi

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Joint Math-FLDS/ CPS Seminar

    Wed, Feb 19, 2020 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Reinhard Heckel, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Technical, University of Munich

    Talk Title: Image Recovery and Recognition via Exploiting the Structural Bias of Neural Networks

    Abstract: Deep neural networks are highly successful tools for image classification, recovery, and restoration. This success is often attributed to large amounts of training data. However, recent findings challenge this view and instead suggest that a major contributing factor to this success is that the architecture imposes strong prior assumptions-”so strong that it enables image recovery without any training data. In this talk we discuss two instances of this phenomena: First, we show that fitting a convolutional network to a corrupted and/or under-sampled measurement of an image provably removes noise and corruptions from that image, without ever having trained the network. Second, we show that it is possible to learn from a dataset with both true and false examples, obtained without explicit human annotations, by exploiting the phenomena that neural networks fit true examples faster than false ones.

    Host: Mahdi Soltanolkotabi, soltanol@usc.edu

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia White

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  • AME Seminar

    Wed, Feb 19, 2020 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Alberto Aliseda, University of Washington

    Talk Title: Fluid Mechanics of Intracranial Aneurysms: Fundamental Aspects and Application to Clinical Decision-Making

    Abstract: The fluid mechanics inside intracranial aneurysms dominate the efficacy of endovascular treatment methods, modulating the mechanical stresses and residence times inside the sac and at the aneurysmal neck. Embolic coils and flow-diverting stents, the two dominant types of endovascular devices for treatment, are designed to slow down flow inside the aneurysmal volume and reduce stresses on the aneurysmal sac, creating an environment that enables successful thrombosis in the aneurysm, which eliminates the risk of rupture.

    In-vitro experiments characterize the hemodynamics inside intracranial aneurysms, prior to treatment and post-treatment with flow-diverting stents. We use stereo (2D-3C) and 3D (3D-3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) to explore the parameter space of aneurysms in a large cohort of patients followed along several years. The flow measurements are interpreted as a combination of two canonical flows: flow in a curved pipe and cavity flow. As such, the parent-vessel Reynolds and Dean numbers are the relevant non-dimensional parameters. Unsteadiness in the cardiac cycle introduces the Womersley number as a third component of flow inertia. Despite inertia dominating the parent-vessel flow, flow-diverting stents significantly reduce the velocity inside the aneurysmal sac, leading to viscous-dominated flow. A critical Dean number is identified that separates two opposite flow behaviors that could help predict treatment success.

    I will also discuss a computational investigation of a large population of patients whose aneurysm treatments are followed over time, to determine the mechanism by which endovascular treatment fails to prevent aneurysmal growth. A novel modeling technique that uses high-resolution, synchrotron micro-CT scans to understand the flow inside coiled aneurysm enables homogenization methods for improved porous medium representation of deployed coils or stents, improving the clinical utility of the simulation results.

    Host: AME Department

    More Info: https://ame.usc.edu/seminars/

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Tessa Yao

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  • AME Seminar

    Wed, Feb 19, 2020 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Alberto Aliseda, University of Washington

    Talk Title: Fluid Mechanics of Intracranial Aneurysms: Fundamental Aspects and Application to Clinical Decision-Making

    Abstract: The fluid mechanics inside intracranial aneurysms dominate the efficacy of endovascular treatment methods, modulating the mechanical stresses and residence times inside the sac and at the aneurysmal neck. Embolic coils and flow-diverting stents, the two dominant types of endovascular devices for treatment, are designed to slow down flow inside the aneurysmal volume and reduce stresses on the aneurysmal sac, creating an environment that enables successful thrombosis in the aneurysm, which eliminates the risk of rupture.

    In-vitro experiments characterize the hemodynamics inside intracranial aneurysms, prior to treatment and post-treatment with flow-diverting stents. We use stereo (2D-3C) and 3D (3D-3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) to explore the parameter space of aneurysms in a large cohort of patients followed along several years. The flow measurements are interpreted as a combination of two canonical flows: flow in a curved pipe and cavity flow. As such, the parent-vessel Reynolds and Dean numbers are the relevant non-dimensional parameters. Unsteadiness in the cardiac cycle introduces the Womersley number as a third component of flow inertia. Despite inertia dominating the parent-vessel flow, flow-diverting stents significantly reduce the velocity inside the aneurysmal sac, leading to viscous-dominated flow. A critical Dean number is identified that separates two opposite flow behaviors that could help predict treatment success.

    I will also discuss a computational investigation of a large population of patients whose aneurysm treatments are followed over time, to determine the mechanism by which endovascular treatment fails to prevent aneurysmal growth. A novel modeling technique that uses high-resolution, synchrotron micro-CT scans to understand the flow inside coiled aneurysm enables homogenization methods for improved porous medium representation of deployed coils or stents, improving the clinical utility of the simulation results.

    Host: AME Department

    More Info: https://ame.usc.edu/seminars/

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Tessa Yao

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  • Medical Imaging Seminars - Part 1 of 2

    Wed, Feb 19, 2020 @ 04:00 PM - 04:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: E. Brian Welch, Ph.D., M.B.A., Director of Clinical Science, Hyperfine, Guilford, CT

    Talk Title: Portable Point-of-Care Bedside MRI

    Series: Medical Imaging Seminar Series

    Abstract: I will describe the career path that led me from USC (B.S. B.M.E.E. 1998) to graduate school, experiences in industry to academia and back to industry again, and conclude with the most exciting stage of my career so far -“ helping to validate the clinical utility of the world's first portable point-of-care bedside MRI scanner.


    Biography: Brian is a biomedical-electrical engineer (B.S. BME-E University of Southern California, 1998) whose Ph.D. training at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine focused on biomedical imaging. Specifically, he is an expert in methods and software development for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). His previous and ongoing work concentrates on overcoming the real-world limitations that hinder research and clinical applications of MRI. Strategies to overcome these challenges include hardware and software solutions, alternative data acquisition and reconstruction methods, novel MRI pulse sequences, quantitative imaging methods and associated post-processing tools. Based on more than 20 years of experience in MRI and 6 years of work experience as the on-site Philips Healthcare MR clinical scientist supporting research projects at Vanderbilt University, Dr. Welch acquired deep knowledge of the capabilities of the 3T and 7T human scanners housed at the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science (VUIIS). Dr. Welch applied that experience and knowledge to his own independent research programs as a Vanderbilt faculty member with contributions in the areas of fat-water MRI, human brown adipose tissue imaging, and continuously moving table MRI. Most recently, Dr. Welch joined the startup company Hyperfine in 2017 as the Director of Clinical Science with the goal of validating the clinical utility of the world's first portable point-of-care bedside MRI scanner.

    Host: Prof. Krishna Nayak, knayak@usc.edu

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia White

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  • Medical Imaging Seminars - Part 2 of 2

    Wed, Feb 19, 2020 @ 04:30 PM - 05:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Houchun Harry Hu, Ph.D., Clinical Scientist, Hyperfine, Guilford, CT

    Talk Title: Fat to Water in Pediatric MRI

    Series: Medical Imaging Seminar Series

    Abstract: I will share my experience and career path/choices as a MRI physicist working in three large children's hospitals, from Los Angeles (2011-2014), to Phoenix (2014-2017), to Columbus (2017-2019). I will highlight several projects, including my interests in childhood obesity, my work with spiral MRI in the clinical setting, my foray into non-Gadolinium angiography techniques and arterial spin labeling in children, and my interest in non-Cartesian free-breathing techniques. I will conclude with my thoughts on the promises of a portable point of care MRI system in pediatric settings.

    Biography: Houchun Harry Hu, Ph.D., Clinical Scientist, Hyperfine, Guilford, CT Talk Title: Fat to Water in Pediatric MRI Series: MHI Distinguished Visitor Seminar Series Abstract: I will share my experience and career path/choices as a MRI physicist working in three large children's hospitals, from Los Angeles (2011-2014), to Phoenix (2014-2017), to Columbus (2017-2019). I will highlight several projects, including my interests in childhood obesity, my work with spiral MRI in the clinical setting, my foray into non-Gadolinium angiography techniques and arterial spin labeling in children, and my interest in non-Cartesian free-breathing techniques. I will conclude with my thoughts on the promises of a portable point of care MRI system in pediatric settings. Biography: Harry has been working in the domain of pediatric MRI over the last 12 years. He obtained his undergraduate degree (B.S., BME/BMEC) from USC in 2001, and went on to earn a PhD (2006) in BME / MRI from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. From 2006-2011, he spent time in Professor Krishna Nayak's laboratory at USC working primarily on water-fat imaging. From 2011-2014, he transitioned to Children's Hospital Los Angeles to work on NIH-funded projects in brown adipose tissue. From 2014-2017, Harry moved to Arizona to work as a clinical MRI physicist at Phoenix Children's Hospital, collaborating with Dr. James Pipe from the Barrow Neurological Institute on spiral acquisitions in pediatric brain applications. In June 2017, Harry was recruited to Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, as the Director of Imaging Research. In late 2019, Harry joined Hyperfine as a Clinical Scientist as a member of Dr. E. Brian Welch's team to focus on the deployment of the company's point-of-care portable MRI systems in pediatric centers. Harry has served as a Deputy Editor for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (2012-2017) and is currently an Associate Editor for Radiology and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Host: Prof. Krishna Nayak, knayak@usc.edu

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Talyia White

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  • Talent Show

    Wed, Feb 19, 2020 @ 06:00 PM - 07:30 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    Receptions & Special Events


    KIUEL will be hosting a Talent Show on February 19th, 2020 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM! Come out and celebrate Engineers Week with your fellow peers and see all the different talents they have! For those interested in performing in the Talent Show, submit your act at:
    USC Viterbi KIUEL Talent Show

    Location: Ground Zero

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Viterbi Undergraduate Programs

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  • Spotlight Panel- Computer Science & Computer Engineering

    Wed, Feb 19, 2020 @ 07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    The Viterbi Alumni & Industry Spotlight Series is your opportunity to hear directly from USC alumni and industry professionals from all engineering disciplines. Learn more about a potential career, meet alumni in your field, and come have free dinner on us!

    Computer Science and Computer Engineering Alumni & Industry Panel

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: Undergrad

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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