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Events for March 01, 2019

  • Repeating EventMeet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, and Engineering Talk

    Fri, Mar 01, 2019

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Workshops & Infosessions


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen (HS juniors and younger) and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process, a student led walking tour of campus, and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. During the engineering session we will discuss the curriculum, research opportunities, hands-on projects, entrepreneurial support programs, and other aspects of the engineering school. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process, and financial aid.

    Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m.

    Please make sure to check availability and register online for the session you wish to attend. Also, remember to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    RSVP

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - USC Admission Office

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

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    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • ASME Spring Social

    Fri, Mar 01, 2019 @ 12:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Organizations

    Student Activity


    Need a break from studying for midterms? Do you like delicious snacks? Want to meet and hang out with other engineers? Well you're in luck because ASME will be hosting our Fall Social in the VHE Breeze Way from 12pm to 3pm on March 1st, 2019! We will be having an egg hunt, props for fun pictures, and plenty of snacks so come swing by whenever you can! Everyone is welcome so bring your friends and come have a good time!

    Location: Vivian Hall of Engineering (VHE) - Breeze Way

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

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  • ASME Spring Social

    Fri, Mar 01, 2019 @ 12:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Organizations

    Student Activity


    Need a break from studying for midterms? Do you like delicious snacks? Want to meet and hang out with other engineers? Well you're in luck because ASME will be hosting our Fall Social in the VHE Breeze Way from 12pm to 3pm on March 1st, 2019! We will be having an egg hunt, props for fun pictures, and plenty of snacks so come swing by whenever you can! Everyone is welcome so bring your friends and come have a good time!

    Location: Vivian Hall of Engineering (VHE) - Breeze Way

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

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  • W.V.T. RUSCH ENGINEERING HONORS COLLOQUIUM

    Fri, Mar 01, 2019 @ 01:00 PM - 01:50 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Mr. Mark Navarrete, Structures Design Manager, Northrop Grumman Corporation

    Talk Title: Structural Design Engineering in The Aerospace Industry

    Host: EHP and Dr. Prata

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Amanda McCraven

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  • Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Fri, Mar 01, 2019 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Zahra Kharal, University of Toronto

    Talk Title: Towards Understanding the Seismic Behaviour of FRP Confined Concrete Columns

    Abstract: A large inventory of deficient reinforced concrete (RC) structures exist in which steel corrosion is the main cause of deficiency. Corrosion of steel in columns is especially a serious issue in existing structures, as it can lead to unexpected brittle structural failure in earthquakes or worse, under static gravity loads alone. While upgrading of these structures is a priority, the new structures need to be built such that they do not undergo similar ageing problems. Research on glass fibre reinforced polymers (GFRP) as internal reinforcement has shown promise as a durable material for building sustainable infrastructure. The research that I will present investigated the use of GFRP longitudinal bars and GFRP transverse reinforcement in columns for seismic resistance. The experimental program involved extensive testing of full-scale GFRP- and steel-RC columns under simulated earthquake loads. The variables investigated included column shape (circular or square), amount and spacing of transverse reinforcement, type of longitudinal and transverse reinforcement (steel or GFRP), reinforcement configuration and axial load level. A significant conclusion drawn from this research was that not only can GFRP be used as primary transverse reinforcement in columns but, in some cases, can provide better confinement than steel. In addition, a computation program was developed that can predict the behavior of steel and FRP-spiral and -tied confined columns subjected to seismic loading. The novelty of this program is in being able to rapidly analyze the column while still capturing the full nonlinear response of the column.


    Host: Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Location: Ray R. Irani Hall (RRI) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Salina Palacios

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  • Clarice Aiello - Seminar, Friday, March 1st at 2pm in EEB 132

    Fri, Mar 01, 2019 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Clarice Aiello, Stanford University

    Talk Title: From nanotech to living sensors: unraveling the spin physics of biosensing at the nanoscale

    Abstract: I am a quantum engineer interested in how quantum physics informs biology at the nanoscale.

    As a physicist, I have developed high-performance nanosensors that essentially worked due to room-temperature quantum effects in noisy environments. Currently, I am focusing on "living sensors" -- organisms and cells that respond to minute stimuli, routinely outperforming technological probes in awe-inspiring ways. Unveiling and controlling the underlying physical mechanisms employed by "living sensors" impact: the engineering of ultrasensitive, bio-inspired electromagnetic probes; the elucidation of mesmerizing natural feats such as animal navigation; and the advancement of therapeutics for metabolic-related diseases.

    Substantial in vitro and physiological experimental results are consistent with the fact that similar spin physics might underlie biosensing modalities as varied as organismal magnetic field detection and metabolic regulation of oxidative stress in cells.

    Can spin physics be established -- or refuted! -- to account for physiologically relevant biosensing phenomena, and be manipulated to technological and therapeutical advantage? This is the broad, exciting question that I wish to address in my scientific career.

    Biography: Clarice D. Aiello is a quantum engineer born and raised in Brazil. She trained as an experimental physicist in Europe, having earned a Diplome d'Ingenieur de l'Ecole Polytechnique in France, and an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge, Trinity College, in England.

    Research brought Clarice to the American shore. She completed her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at MIT with Prof. Paola Cappellaro. Her work has been funded by sources as diverse as the Fulbright Commission, the Schlumberger Foundation and UNESCO. Clarice is also a recipient of MIT's School of Engineering's "Graduate Student Award for Extraordinary Teaching and Mentoring".

    Clarice then undertook postdoctoral research with Prof. Naomi Ginsberg, in the Chemistry Department of the University of California at Berkeley. Currently, Clarice is a Life Sciences Research Foundation/Moore Foundation postdoctoral fellow with Prof. Manu Prakash, in Stanford University's Bioengineering Department.

    She has recently been chosen as a "Rising Star in Physics", and intends to invest her interdisciplinary training to investigate how quantum physics informs biology at the nanoscale.

    Host: ECE-Electrophysics

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

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