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Events for March 12, 2020

  • *CANCELLED* CAIS Seminar: Meredith Gore - Wildlife Trafficking in the Anthropocene: Conservation, Crime & Communities

    Thu, Mar 12, 2020 @ 09:45 AM - 10:45 AM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Meredith Gore, PhD

    Talk Title: Wildlife Trafficking in the Anthropocene: Conservation, Crime & Communities

    Series: USC Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society (CAIS) Seminar Series

    Abstract: Levels of unsustainable and illegal natural resource exploitation have escalated in scope, scale, and severity. Illegal over-harvest of plant and animal species occurs around the world and poses risks to species, ecosystems, and people. Beyond the risk of species loss, overexploitation represents stolen natural resources, is associated with corruption and insecurity, human rights abuses, and regional destabilization in some of the world's most vulnerable developing nations. This presentation will discuss conservation criminology-”an interdisciplinary and applied science for understanding risks to global natural resources.


    Biography: Dr. Meredith Gore is a conservation social scientist leveraging concepts of risk to enhance understanding of human-environment relationships. Her scholarship is designed to build evidence for action. The majority of her scientific inquiry can be described as convergence research on conservation issues such as wildlife trafficking, illegal logging, fishing and mining. She received her PhD in Natural Resource Policy and Management from Cornell University, MA in Environment and Resource Policy from George Washington University, and BA in Anthropology and Environmental Studies from Brandeis University. She's a MSU Global Research Academy Fellow, National Academies of Sciences Jefferson Science Fellow, US Department of State Embassy Science Fellow and Emerging Wildlife Conservation Leader.


    Host: USC Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society (CAIS)

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Computer Science Department

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  • CS Colloquium: Ludwig Schmidt (UC Berkeley) - Do ImageNet Classifiers Generalize to ImageNet?

    Thu, Mar 12, 2020 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Ludwig Schmidt, UC Berkeley

    Talk Title: Do ImageNet Classifiers Generalize to ImageNet?

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Progress on the ImageNet dataset seeded much of the excitement around the machine learning revolution of the past decade. In this talk, we analyze this progress in order to understand the obstacles blocking the path towards safe, dependable, and secure machine learning.

    First, we will investigate the nature and extent of overfitting on ML benchmarks through reproducibility experiments for ImageNet and other key datasets. Our results show that overfitting through test set re-use is surprisingly absent, but distribution shift poses a major open problem for reliable ML.

    In the second part, we will focus on a particular robustness issue, known as adversarial examples, and develop methods inspired by optimization and generalization theory to address this issue. We conclude with a large experimental study of current robustness interventions that summarizes the main challenges going forward.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium


    Biography: Ludwig Schmidt is a postdoctoral researcher at UC Berkeley working with Moritz Hardt and Ben Recht. Ludwig's research interests revolve around the empirical and theoretical foundations of machine learning, often with a focus on making machine learning more reliable. Before Berkeley, Ludwig completed his PhD at MIT under the supervision of Piotr Indyk. Ludwig received a Google PhD fellowship, a Microsoft Simons fellowship, a best paper award at the International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), and the Sprowls dissertation award from MIT.

    Host: Haipeng Luo

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Thu, Mar 12, 2020 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Larry Rossen, Professor Emeritus of Psychology Department, California State University, Dominguez Hill

    Talk Title: WE ARE FACING AN ATTENTION CRISIS: WHAT IS DRIVING OUR DISTRACTED MINDS?

    Abstract: See attached abstract.


    Host: Dr. Burcin Becerik-Gerber

    More Information: Larry Rossen-Abstract_3-12-2020.pdf

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • POSTPONED- Internship/Job Search Open Forum

    Thu, Mar 12, 2020 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Will be rescheduled virtually at a later date.

    For more information about Labs & Open Forums, please visit viterbicareers.usc.edu/workshops.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) -

    Audiences: All Viterbi

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • **LOCATION CHANGE**CS Colloquium: Ioannis Panageas (SUTD) - Depth-width trade-offs for ReLU networks via Sharkovsky's theorem

    Thu, Mar 12, 2020 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Ioannis Panageas, Singapore University of Technology and Design

    Talk Title: Depth-width trade-offs for ReLU networks via Sharkovsky's theorem

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Understanding the representational power of Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) and how their structural properties (e.g., depth, width, type of activation unit) affect the functions they can compute, has been an important yet challenging question in deep learning and approximation theory. In a seminal paper, Telgarsky highlighted the benefits of depth by presenting a family of functions (based on simple triangular waves) for which DNNs achieve zero classification error, whereas shallow networks with fewer than exponentially many nodes incur constant error. Even though Telgarsky's work reveals the limitations of shallow neural networks, it does not inform us on why these functions are difficult to represent and in fact he states it as a tantalizing open question to characterize those functions that cannot be well-approximated by smaller depths. In this talk, we will point to a new connection between DNNs expressivity and Sharkovsky's Theorem from dynamical systems, that enables us to characterize the depth-width trade-offs of ReLU networks for representing functions based on the presence of generalized notion of fixed points, called periodic points (a fixed point is a point of period 1). Motivated by our observation that the triangle waves used in Telgarsky's work contain points of period 3 - a period that is special in that it implies chaotic behavior based on the celebrated result by Li-Yorke - we will give general lower bounds for the width needed to represent periodic functions as a function of the depth. Technically, the crux of our approach is based on an eigenvalue analysis of the dynamical system associated with such functions.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium

    Biography: Ioannis Panageas is an Assistant Professor at Information Systems Department of SUTD since September 2018. Prior to that he was a MIT postdoctoral fellow working with Constantinos Daskalakis. He received his PhD in Algorithms, Combinatorics and Optimization from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2016, a Diploma in EECS from National Technical University of Athens (summa cum laude) and a M.Sc. in Mathematics from Georgia Institute of Technology. His work lies on the intersection of optimization, probability, learning theory, dynamical systems and algorithms. He is the recipient of the 2019 NRF fellowship for AI (analogue of NSF CAREER award).

    URL Website: https://panageas.github.io/

    Host: Shaddin Dughmi

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 115

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Port of Los Angeles - Conflict, Commerce, and the Flight for Control - Book Launch and Lecture

    Thu, Mar 12, 2020 @ 06:30 PM - 07:30 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Geraldine Knatz, PhD, Professor of the Practice of Policy and Engineering at USC

    Talk Title: Port of Los Angeles - Conflict, Commerce, and the Flight for Control - Book Launch and Lecture

    Abstract: With years of research, 200 maps and images, Knatz shapes and insightful story of the Port of Los Angeles, from its early entrepreneurs to the city's business and political leadership, and the inevitable conflicts that arose between them. Power moves disguised as bureaucratic banalities, jurisdictional feuds, and outright warfare - it is all here.

    Host: .

    More Information: Knatz Book Launch and Lecture.jpg

    Location: Ralph And Goldy Lewis Hall (RGL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Salina Palacios

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