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Events for March 30, 2017

  • Gianluca Lazzi - Thursday, March 30th at 10:30am in EEB 132

    Thu, Mar 30, 2017 @ 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Gianluca Lazzi, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Utah

    Talk Title: Bioelectromagnetics for Neuroimplants: from Wireless Power and Data Transfer to Direct Neurostimulation

    Abstract: During the past decade, we have witnessed remarkable progress in neural implants, and more generally in the development of systems that interface with the human body for recording neural activity or vital signs or stimulating the neural system. The challenges toward the development of true biomimetic systems are daunting: nonetheless, electrical or magnetic systems that can partially restore neural functions or offer therapeutic solutions have recently shown tremendous progress and potential. Prospects for electroneural interfaces to further evolve and offer a viable solution to various disorders are high.
    In this talk, we will utilize examples of electric and magnetic neurostimulators, such as the artificial retina to restore partial vision to the blind, cortical neurostimulators, and magnetic peripheral neurostimulators, to introduce advances in computational bioelectromagnetics and physical neurointerfaces that enabled the progress of neurostimulating and neurorecording systems, with particular emphasis on coil-based systems for wireless power and data transfer, direct magnetic neurostimulation, multiscale computational models and methods, and liquid metal based stretchable systems.

    Biography: Gianluca Lazzi, PhD, MBA, is a USTAR Professor and the Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Utah.
    Gianluca is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Fellow of the AIMBE. He has received numerous awards for his work, including the IEEE Wheeler Award, a R&D100 Award, a URSI Young Scientist Award, the BEMS "Curtis Carl Johnson Award," a NSF CAREER Award and a Whitaker Foundation Young Investigator Award. His research interests are in the fields of bioelectromagnetics, liquid metal electronics, antennas, wireless electromagnetics, and electric and magnetic neurostimulation. He has published over 200 papers in journals, conference proceedings, and books. Gianluca's research work has been featured in publications such as Forbes, the Economist, MSNBC, MIT Technology Review, and several others. Gianluca has been the Editor-in-Chief (EiC) from 2008 to 2013 of one of the leading journals in the field of antennas and propagation, IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWPL), which reached nearly 2,000 submissions in 2013 during his tenure - a growth of 400% in submissions. He serves or served IEEE in numerous other roles, including being the Chair of the IEEE Sensors Technical Achievement Award Committee (2011-2012), Chair of the IEEE Sensors Council Fellow Committee (2013-2015), Chair of Publications of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (2013-Present), a member of AdCom of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (2014-Present), and a member of the Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the IEEE (2011-Present). He was one of the speakers at a recent Grand Challenges in Life Science Symposium, held at the National Academies, which resulted in the position paper "Grand Challenges in Interfacing Engineering With Life Sciences and Medicine" published in IEEE TBME. He was the General Co-Chair of the 2014 IEEE Microwave Symposium on RF and Wireless Technologies for Biomedical Applications (London, UK).
    In 2015, Dr. Lazzi cofounded the company Bend LLC with a private equity firm. Bend LLC is focused on the commercialization of liquid metal technology for sensor integration in athletic apparel and consumer electronics.




    Host: EE-Electrophysics

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Marilyn Poplawski

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  • CS Colloquium: Kevin Jamieson (UC Berkeley) - Efficient scalable algorithms for adaptive data collection

    Thu, Mar 30, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Kevin Jamieson, UC Berkeley

    Talk Title: Efficient scalable algorithms for adaptive data collection

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium.

    In many applications, data-driven discovery is limited by the rate of data collection: the skilled labor it takes to operate a pipette, the time to execute a long-running physics simulation, the patience of an infant to remain still in an MRI, or the cost of labeling large corpuses of complex images. A powerful paradigm to extract the most information with such limited resources is active learning, or adaptive data collection, which leverages already-collected data to guide future measurements in a closed loop. But being convinced that data-collection should be adaptive is not the same thing as knowing how to adapt in a way that is both sample efficient and reliable. In this talk, I will present several examples of my provably reliable -- and practical -- adaptive data collection algorithms being applied in the real-world. In particular, I will show how my adaptive algorithms are used each week to crowd-source the winner of the New Yorker Magazine Cartoon Caption Contest. I will also discuss my application of adaptive learning concepts at Google to accelerate the tuning of deep networks in a highly parallelized environment of thousands of GPUs.

    Biography: Kevin Jamieson is a postdoctoral researcher working with Professor Benjamin Recht in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. He is interested in the theory and practice of machine learning algorithms that sequentially collect data using an adaptive strategy. This includes active learning, multi-armed bandit problems, and stochastic optimization. Kevin received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin - Madison under the advisement of Robert Nowak. Prior to his doctoral work, Kevin received his B.S. from the University of Washington, and an M.S. from Columbia University, both in electrical engineering.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 217

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Why Don't they Understand Me? Pronunciation in a U.S. Business Setting

    Thu, Mar 30, 2017 @ 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    While English is the lingua-franca in U.S. business settings, the variety of English accents can cause communication breakdowns. This workshop, presented by American Language Institute Master Lecturer Barry Griner, focuses on areas of pronunciation that you can adjust so that your accent is more easily understood by colleagues and employers.

    Click here to RSVP.

    Location: Mark Taper Hall Of Humanities (THH) - 201

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Lilian Barajas

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  • CS Colloquium: Jyotirmoy V. Deshmukh (Toyota Technical Center) -Ninja Temporal Logic: Making formal methods relevant in engineering practice

    Thu, Mar 30, 2017 @ 04:00 PM - 05:20 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Jyotirmoy V. Deshmukh, Toyota Technical Center

    Talk Title: Ninja Temporal Logic: Making formal methods relevant in engineering practice

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium.

    The software that controls the operation of critical systems such as vehicles, medical devices, buildings, and transportation infrastructures is getting smarter due to the increased demands for autonomy. The push for increased automation is a worthy goal, but can we do so without compromising the safety and reliability of such systems?
    Furthermore, can formal methods truly improve a design engineer's productivity? In this talk, I will introduce some of the most important questions facing academic and industrial development of software for the cyber-physical systems of tomorrow. We will consider solutions based on the use of formal logics, that, on one hand allow rigorous reasoning about system designs, while on the other, do not place an undue burden on the engineer. In particular, I will explain how formal requirements using real-time temporal logics have had an impact in the development of cutting-edge alternate-energy vehicles and advanced control problems within Toyota. I will guide the audience through an ecosystem built around temporal logic that permits automatic testing, efficient monitoring, requirement engineering and controller synthesis for highly complex automotive systems. The talk covers topics from what I consider the trifecta for designing reliable cyber-physical systems: formal logic, machine learning, and control theory, and will lay out my vision for future research and open problems within this domain.

    Biography: Jyotirmoy V. Deshmukh is a Principal Engineer at Toyota R&D. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin under the supervision of E. Allen Emerson on topics including tree automata, verifying data structure libraries, static analysis for concurrent programs and program repair. He worked as a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania with Rajeev Alur's research group, investigating theoretical models of streaming computation and program synthesis techniques. For the last five years at Toyota, Jyo's research has focused on the design and analysis of industrial cyber-physical systems. Drawing on areas such as hybrid systems, real-time temporal logics, control theory, machine learning and dynamical systems theory, Jyo has been attempting to bridge the gap between academic research and its applicability to industrial-scale systems.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Assistant to CS chair

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