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Events for November 08, 2017

  • Repeating EventMeet USC: Admission Presentation, Campus Tour, and Engineering Talk

    Wed, Nov 08, 2017

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Receptions & Special Events


    This half day program is designed for prospective freshmen and family members. Meet USC includes an information session on the University and the Admission process, a student led walking tour of campus, and a meeting with us in the Viterbi School. During the engineering session we will discuss the curriculum, research opportunities, hands-on projects, entrepreneurial support programs, and other aspects of the engineering school. Meet USC is designed to answer all of your questions about USC, the application process, and financial aid.

    Reservations are required for Meet USC. This program occurs twice, once at 8:30 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m.

    Please make sure to check availability and register online for the session you wish to attend. Also, remember to list an Engineering major as your "intended major" on the webform!

    RSVP

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - USC Admission Office

    Audiences: Prospective Freshmen & Family Members

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    Posted By: Viterbi Admission

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Wed, Nov 08, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Urs von Gunten,

    Talk Title: TBA

    Abstract: TBA

    Location: TBA

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Evangeline Reyes

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  • Center for Cyber-Physical Systems and Internet of Things and Ming Hsieh Institute for Electrical Engineering Joint Seminar Series on Cyber-Physical Systems

    Wed, Nov 08, 2017 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Pavithra Prabhakar, Associate Professor, Kansas State University

    Talk Title: Formal Verification of Robustness Properties of Cyber-Physical Systems

    Abstract: Cyber-physical systems (CPSs) consist of complex systems that combine control, computation and communication to achieve sophisticated functionalities as in autonomous driving in driverless cars and automated load balancing in smart grids. The safety criticality of these systems demands strong guarantees about their correct functioning. Formal verification is an area of computer science that deals with rigorous and automated methods for correctness analysis based on mathematical models of systems and correctness specifications. In this talk, we present an overview of our work on formal verification techniques for cyber-physical systems analysis using the framework of hybrid systems. Hybrid systems capture an important feature of CPSs, namely, mixed discrete-continuous behaviors that arise due to the interaction of complex digital control software (discrete elements) with physical systems (continuous elements).

    We will focus on the formal verification of a fundamental property in control design, namely, stability. Stability is a robustness property that capture notions such as small perturbations to the initial state or input to a system result in only small variations in the behavior of the system. We will present a novel algorithmic approach to stability analysis based on model-checking and abstraction-refinement techniques. We highlight the technical challenges in the development of an algorithmic framework for stability analysis owing to the robustness aspect. We will present experimental results using our tool AVERIST (Algorithmic VERifier for STability), that illustrate the practical benefits of the algorithmic approach as compared to well-known deductive methods for automated verification of stability based on Lyapunov functions. Finally, we will present some future research directions including automated design of hybrid control systems and formal analysis of hybrid systems in the presence of uncertainties.


    Biography: Pavithra Prabhakar is an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Peggy and Gary Edwards Chair in Engineering at the Kansas State University. She obtained her doctorate in Computer Science and a masters in Applied Mathematics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, followed by a CMI postdoctoral fellowship at the California Institute of Technology. Her main research interest is in formal analysis of cyber-physical systems with emphasis on both foundational and practical aspects related to automated and scalable techniques for verification and synthesis of hybrid systems. She is the recipient of a Marie Curie Career Integration Grant from the EU, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award.

    Host: Paul Bogdan

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Estela Lopez

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  • Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering Seminar

    Wed, Nov 08, 2017 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: James J. Riley, PACCAR Professor of Engineering, University of Washington

    Talk Title: The Effects of Stable Density Stratification Initially Homogeneous, Isotropic Turbulence

    Abstract: Stable density stratification occurs in various situations in the atmosphere and in the oceans. For example, in the atmosphere stable density stratification is found near the tropopause and above, and often in nocturnal boundary layers, while in the oceans it usually is observed below the mixed layer. And, through its effects on turbulent mixing, stable stratification has relevance to a number of important issues such as the overall ocean thermal energy balance and the transfer rates of heat and chemicals to/from the atmosphere.

    In this seminar the results are presented of a study of the effects of stable density stratification on the simplest of turbulent flows, initially homogeneous, isotropic turbulence, using direct numerical simulations. Simulations were carried out at an initially moderate Froude number, but for a range of initial Reynolds numbers such that, for the high Reynolds number cases, the flows had buoyancy Reynolds numbers in the hundreds, similar to typical oceanic values. A number of aspects of the flows have been addressed, including their energetics, the behavior of various velocity and length scales describing the flows, their mixing characteristics, and their spectral behavior. In particular, how the behavior of the flows depend on the local Froude and buoyancy Reynolds numbers is emphasized. It is found, for example, that as the flows decay, stratification modifies them such that, compared to non-stratified cases, the energy decay rates decreased, the growth rate of the horizontal scales increased, while the growth rates of the vertical scales became negative. These results are consistent with the analysis of Davidson (J. Fluid Mech., 2010), based upon the behavior of the effects of density stratification on the large-scale motions. On the other hand if the buoyancy Reynolds number becomes too low, then the flows, especially the vertical velocity, begin to decay much more rapidly. It is also found, for example, that the behavior of the spectra of the velocity gradient tensor is consistent with the heuristic arguments of Lilly (J. Atmos. Sci., 1983) and the scaling arguments of Billant & Chomaz (Phys. Fluids, 2001). Finally, previous results of the USC group (e.g., Spedding J. Fluid Mech., 1997) are interpreted in terms of the Froude and buoyancy Reynolds numbers.

    Biography: James J. Riley is the PACCAR Professor of Engineering at the University of Washington. He received his PhD from the Johns Hopkins University in 1972, having worked under the guidance of Stanley Corrsin. After a year as a post-doctoral fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, he spent ten years in industry at Flow Research Company in Kent, Washington, ultimately as the Director of the Fluid Mechanics Division. He joined the University of Washington in 1983, where he is now a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and an Adjunct Professor in both the Departments of Applied Mathematics and of Aeronautics and Astronautics. While on sabbatical at the Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble, France, Riley occupied the Visiting Chair in Industrial Mathematics. More recently he was a Senior Fellow at the Isaac Newton Institute for the Mathematical Sciences at Cambridge University. Riley's research interests have included particle dispersion in turbulent flows, waves and turbulence in stably-stratified and in rotating fluids, boundary layer and shear layer transition and turbulence, fluid/compliant surface interactions, and chemically reacting turbulent flows. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics and of the Journal of Turbulence, and until recently was a member of the editorial boards of the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics and of the Applied Mechanics Reviews. Riley is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and of the Washington State Academy of Sciences.

    Host: Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 150

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Posted By: Ashleen Knutsen

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  • ITP Distinguished Speaker Series - November 8th

    Wed, Nov 08, 2017 @ 06:30 PM - 08:00 PM

    Information Technology Program (ITP)

    Receptions & Special Events


    USC Viterbi School of Engineering's Information Technology Program (ITP) is proud to present the ITP Distinguished Speaker Series. Each month, the program will host a distinguished industry professional to speak to USC students, faculty, and staff about many and varied topics that encompass what it means to work in an Information Technology field.

    Please join us in November for Facilitating Innovation, an engaging workshop with USC Graduate Professor and international award-winning keynote speaker, SASHA STRAUSS.

    Sprinkles cupcakes reception to follow!

    Details:

    Wed, November 8, 2017
    6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) 101

    Speaker Bio:

    SASHA STRAUSS is an international authority on brand strategy. Corporations, non-profits, universities, and faiths call on Sasha and his team to create and communicate organizational purpose for startups to Fortune 100s.

    In 2006, Sasha founded Innovation Protocol, a brand consultancy headquartered in Los Angeles, with staff in San Francisco and New York. Clients range from Google, Disney, and Amgen, to the Roman Catholic Church, Homeboy Industries and the Boy Scouts.

    A renowned international keynote speaker, Sasha has been the lead presenter at some of the world's largest conferences, and has record high satisfaction ratings from Vistage, YPO, Tiger21, and EO audiences. As a graduate professor for 11 years, Sasha is directly engaged with the most decisive consumer minds of the era, and uses their fresh insights to inform his latest speaking engagements.

    For full event information and RSVP, please see our event link: RSVP HERE

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Undergrad

    Posted By: Alexandra Slakter

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  • ISE Alumni & Industry Spotlight

    Wed, Nov 08, 2017 @ 07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Students will hear from alumni and industry professionals regarding their academic/professional experiences.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: Undergrad

    Posted By: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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