Logo: University of Southern California

Events Calendar



Select a calendar:



Filter November Events by Event Type:



Events for November 28, 2023

  • Thesis Proposal (Sasha Volokh)

    Tue, Nov 28, 2023 @ 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Thomas Lord Department of Computer Science

    University Calendar


    Thesis Proposal Committee Members:
    William G.J. Halfond (Chair)
    Nenad Medvidovic
    Andrew Nealen
    Mukund Raghothaman
    Chao Wang    
     
    Abstract:
    Modern computer games often release with significant bugs, causing consumer dissatisfaction and a loss of business and reputation for the companies involved. Testing is a key mechanism by which these issues can be caught and addressed during development. A key requirement for thorough manual and automated testing of games is knowledge of the possible player actions and their associated device inputs. In this thesis I propose novel program analysis techniques to inform both automated testing agents and human testers of the possible game actions. First, I propose a symbolic analysis technique that automatically analyzes the user input handling logic present in games to determine a discrete action space, along with the conditions under which the actions are valid, and the device inputs associated with each action. I then demonstrate how this technique can be adapted to enable effective performance in agents that automatically explore game functionalities. Next, I propose adapting this technique for game playing reinforcement learning agents. Finally, I propose methods to automatically generate in-game instructions for human testers based on the outcome of the action analysis.

    Location: Charles Lee Powell Hall (PHE) - 325

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: CS Events

    OutlookiCal
  • Thesis Proposal (Han Zhang)

    Tue, Nov 28, 2023 @ 12:00 PM - 01:00 PM

    Thomas Lord Department of Computer Science

    University Calendar


    Thesis Proposal Committee Members:
    Sven Koenig (Chair)
    Satish Kumar Thittamaranahalli
    Lars Lindemann
    Satyandra Kumar Gupta
    Ariel Felner
     
    Title: Speeding-up Multi-Objective Search Algorithms
     
    Abstract: In the Multi-Objective Search problem, given a graph in which each edge is annotated with a cost vector, a start state, and a goal state, a typical task is to compute a Pareto frontier. State-of-the-art multi-objective search algorithms conform to the same best-first algorithmic framework. These algorithms are similar to best-first search algorithms, such as A*, but, most differently, they need to consider multiple nodes (with costs that do not dominate each other) for the same state. Due to the similarity between multi-objective and single-objective search algorithms, I hypothesize that one can speed up multi-objective search algorithms by applying insights gained from single-objective search. More specifically, I propose to speed up multi-objective search algorithms by (1) sacrificing solution optimality, (2) using preprocessing techniques, and (3) using efficient data structures for dominance checks.

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 110

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: CS Events

    OutlookiCal
  • SERC Seminar

    Tue, Nov 28, 2023 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: David Miller, NASA-JPL

    Talk Title: If You Cannot Create Space in Your Lab, Create Your Lab in Space

    Abstract: Experimentation is an essential step in maturing technology. Whether it is to measure new phenomena, assess the repeatability and reliability of components, calibrate simulations, determine performance limits, identify operational drivers, or to demonstrate to a decision-maker that the technology works in an operational environment, those experiments must be conducted in an operationally authentic environment. For space, those environments include thermal, radiation, vacuum, lighting conditions, orbital dynamics, the “view,” and long-duration micro-gravity. The first four can be tested to some fidelity in ground-based chambers but the latter three require testing in space.
     
    Analogous to a wind tunnel, testing in long duration micro-gravity allows a formative technology to be tested, under nominal and (more importantly) off-nominal conditions, without harm to the technology, the operator and the platform. This talk will illustrate the use of Shuttle, Mir and the International Space Station as research platforms for maturing space technology whose behavior is dependent upon long duration micro-gravity. This will be done through the lens of three evolvable research facilities that the presenter’s laboratory at MIT developed over the past three decades.

    Biography: David W. Miller is the former Director of the Space Systems Laboratory and the Jerome C. Hunsaker Professor (Post Tenure) in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at M.I.T. Prof. Miller has played an engineering role in the development of space-based apertures.  He has built and operated a dozen space flight experiments spanning Shuttle, Mir, ISS, and free flyers. He was a member of the JWST Product Integrity Team and the Vice Chair and S&T Chair of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He served two and a half years as NASA's Chief Technologist at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC and three years as Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at the Aerospace Corporation. He is currently the Chief Technologist for the Astronomy and Fundamental Physics Directorate at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and an AIAA Fellow and member of the National Academy of Engineering.

    Host: ASTE Department

    Location: Hedco Pertroleum and Chemical Engineering Building (HED) - 116

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Dell Cuason

    OutlookiCal
  • VLP Writing Workshop

    Tue, Nov 28, 2023 @ 02:00 PM - 06:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    Student Activity


    Need help with WRIT 150, WRIT 340, or writing for any other Undergrad course? Looking to get feedback on a final essay, project, application or other writing? Then join the VLP for snacks & expert feedback from our Writing Consultant! The Writing Consultant is available for one-on-one writing consultations from 2-6PM during this event. Take advantage of the study space and snacks to power through your final essays!
    RSVP Today: https://cglink.me/2nB/r393526

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 222

    Audiences: Undergrad

    Contact: Alex Bronz

    Event Link: https://cglink.me/2nB/r393526

    OutlookiCal
  • SERC Seminar

    Tue, Nov 28, 2023 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Astronautical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Charles L. Gustafson, UC Berkeley

    Talk Title: Transformational Communications Satellite, Lessons Learned

    Abstract: The Transformational Communications Satellite Program (TSAT) was an ambitious military program that existed from 2003-2009. It looked to combine existing frequency hopped communications methods with internet protocols and laser communications to provide military users with significant new capabilities. It was ultimately canceled in 2009 prior to fully entering development. This talk will provide an overview of intended capabilities and lessons learned from the program.

    Biography: Charles L. Gustafson is the former Senior Vice President of the Engineering and Technology Group at The Aerospace Corporation, a non-profit consulting company working on government satellite and launch systems. His entire career was spent at Aerospace, during which he worked on a number of communication and remote sensing satellites, launch systems, and intelligence community programs. He served as a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board for four years, including one year overseeing the science and technology review process. He holds a PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from UC Berkeley.

    Host: ASTE Department

    Location: Hedco Pertroleum and Chemical Engineering Building (HED) - 116

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Dell Cuason

    OutlookiCal
  • Thesis Proposal (Hejia Zhang)

    Tue, Nov 28, 2023 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Thomas Lord Department of Computer Science

    University Calendar


    Thesis Proposal Committee members: 
    Stefanos Nikolaidis
    C.C.-Jay Kuo
    Jyo Deshmukh
    Jesse Thomason
    Daniel Seita
     
    Title: Understanding, Learning and Planning for Long-horizon Collaborative Manipulation Tasks
     
    Abstract: Robots that assist humans in their daily activities have to perform long-horizon manipulation tasks, such as cooking, table setting tasks, effectively and collaboratively. To successfully perform these tasks,  robots have to address the problem of generating both high-level task action sequences and low-level executable motion trajectories, which is known as the Task-and-Motion Planning (TAMP) problem. In this thesis, we first explore how robots can understand and imitate human collaborative manipulation task plans by watching YouTube videos. We then study the problem of robots executing specified high-level task goals in any unstructured environments. We specifically focus on a subclass of the TAMP problem, namely the Geometric Task-and-Motion Planning (GTAMP) problem. We present a framework that allows robots to perform GTAMP tasks collaboratively. Finally, we discuss the proposed work that will potentially allow robots to collaborate with humans to perform long-horizon collaborative manipulation tasks in the real world.    

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 110

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: CS Events

    OutlookiCal
  • Epstein Institute, ISE 651 Seminar Class

    Tue, Nov 28, 2023 @ 03:50 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Paul Grigas, Assistant Professor, Department of Industrial Engineering & Operations Research, University of California, Berkeley

    Talk Title: A Margin Theory for Contextual Stochastic Linear Optimization: From Generalization to Active Learning

    Host: Dr. Meisam Razaviyayn

    More Information: November 28, 2023.pdf

    Location: Social Sciences Building (SOS) - SOS Building, B2

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Grace Owh

    OutlookiCal
  • CS Colloquium: Niloufar Salehi (UC Berkeley) - Designing Reliable Human-AI Interactions

    Tue, Nov 28, 2023 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Thomas Lord Department of Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Niloufar Salehi, UC Berkeley

    Talk Title: Designing Reliable Human-AI Interactions

    Abstract: How can users trust an AI system that fails in unpredictable ways? Machine learning models, while powerful, can produce unpredictable results. This uncertainty becomes even more pronounced in areas where verification is challenging, such as in machine translation or probabilistic genotyping. Providing users with guidance on when to rely on a system is challenging because models can create a wide range of outputs (e.g. text), error boundaries are highly stochastic, and automated explanations themselves may be incorrect. In this talk, I will focus on the case of health-care communication to share approaches to improving the reliability of ML-based systems by designing actionable strategies for users to gauge reliability and recover from potential errors.
     
    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium

    Biography: Niloufar Salehi is an assistant professor in the School of Information at UC, Berkeley and faculty member of Berkeley AI Research (BAIR). Her research interests are in social computing, human-centered AI, and more broadly, human-computer interaction (HCI). Her research is in close collaboration with partners and domain experts spanning education to healthcare to restorative justice. Her work has been published and received awards in premier venues including ACM CHI and CSCW and has been covered in VentureBeat, Wired, and the Guardian. She is a W. T. Grant Foundation scholar. She received her PhD in computer science from Stanford University in 2018.

    Host: Souti Chattopadhyay

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: CS Faculty Affairs

    OutlookiCal