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Events for October

  • Advanced Manufacturing: Recent Advances, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Fri, Oct 01, 2021 @ 12:00 PM - 01:30 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Alumni

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Several Faculty, USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Talk Title: Recent Advances, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Abstract: USC Center for Advanced Manufacturing is hosting a session titled "Advanced Manufacturing: Recent Advances, Challenges, and Opportunities" to celebrate National Manufacturing Day.

    Featured presentations include:
    12 to 12:15 PM Yong Chen (In-situ-transfer Additive Manufacturing for Micro-channels with Controlled Thickness)
    12:15 to 12:30 PM Qiming Wang (Advanced Manufacturing of Bioinspired Living Materials with Artificial Metabolism)
    12:30 to 12:45 PM Hangbo Zhao (Unconventional Micro- and Nanomanufacturing for Functional Three-Dimensional Systems)
    12:45 to 1:00 PM Stephen Lu (Workforce Conversation -“ A Key to Future Competitiveness of American Manufacturing)
    1:00 to 1:15 PM Qiang Huang (Quality Control as a Computational Service)
    1:15 to 1:30 PM SK Gupta (Human-Centric Manufacturing Automation)

    Host: USC Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_lCMnKnczRZiyOohL0LnBPQ

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Kristy Ly

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  • ISE 651 - Epstein Seminar

    Tue, Oct 05, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Amy Ward, Rothman Family Professor of Operations Management and Charles M. Harper Faculty Fellow, Chicago Booth

    Talk Title: Behavior-Aware Queueing: The Finite-Buffer Setting with Many Strategic Servers

    Host: Prof. Ali Abbas

    More Info: Please email owh@usc.edu for Zoom Link

    More Information: October 5, 2021.pdf

    Location: Zoom/Online

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Grace Owh

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  • CS Distinguished Lecture: Tomas Lozano-Perez (MIT) - Generalization in Planning and Learning for Robotic Manipulation

    Tue, Oct 05, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Tomas Lozano-Perez, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    Talk Title: Generalization in Planning and Learning for Robotic Manipulation

    Series: Computer Science Distinguished Lecture Series

    Abstract: An enduring goal of AI and robotics has been to build a robot capable of robustly performing a wide variety of tasks in a wide variety of environments; not by sequentially being programmed (or taught) to perform one task in one environment at a time, but rather by intelligently choosing appropriate actions for whatever task and environment it is facing. This goal remains a challenge. In this talk I'll describe recent work in our lab aimed at the goal of general-purpose robot manipulation by integrating task-and-motion planning with various forms of model learning. In particular, I'll describe approaches to manipulating objects without prior shape models, to acquiring composable sensorimotor skills, and to exploiting past experience for more efficient planning.

    Register in advance for this webinar at:

    https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_K4eWcqebRsWT20GhOAbi-g

    After registering, attendees will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium.


    Biography: Tomas Lozano-Perez is professor in EECS at MIT, and a member of CSAIL. He was a recipient of the 2011 IEEE Robotics
    Pioneer Award and a co-recipient of the 2021 IEEE Robotics and Automation Technical Field Award. He is a Fellow of the AAAI, ACM, and IEEE.


    Host: Stefanos Nikolaidis

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_K4eWcqebRsWT20GhOAbi-g

    Location: Online - Zoom Webinar

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_K4eWcqebRsWT20GhOAbi-g

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Computer Science Department

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  • Center of Autonomy and AI, Center for Cyber-Physical Systems and the Internet of Things, and Ming Hsieh Institute Seminar Series

    Wed, Oct 06, 2021 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Monroe Kennedy III, Mechanical Engineering, with a courtesy appointment in Computer Science at Stanford University

    Talk Title: Considerations for Human-Robot Collaboration

    Series: Center for Cyber-Physical Systems and Internet of Things

    Abstract: The field of robotics has evolved over the past few decades. We've seen robots progress from the automation of repetitive tasks in manufacturing to the autonomy of mobilizing in unstructured environments to the cooperation of swarm robots that are centralized or decentralized. These abilities have required advances in robotic hardware, modeling, and artificial intelligence. The next frontier is robots collaborating in complex tasks with human teammates, in environments traditionally configured for humans. While solutions to this challenge must utilize all of the advances of robotics, the human element adds a unique aspect that must be addressed. Collaborating with a human teammate means that the robot must have a contextual understanding of the task as well as all participant's roles. We will discuss what constitutes an effective teammate and how we can capture this behavior in a robotic collaborator.

    Biography: Monroe Kennedy III is an assistant professor in Mechanical Engineering and courtesy of Computer Science at Stanford University. He leads the Assistive Robotics and Manipulation laboratory (arm.stanford.edu), which develops robotic assistants by focusing on combining modeling and control techniques together with machine learning tools. Together, these techniques will improve robotic performance for tasks that are highly dynamic, require dexterity, have considerable complexity, and require human-robot collaboration. Prof. Kennedy received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics and Masters in Robotics at the University of Pennsylvania and was a member of the GRASP Lab. He was the recipient of GEM and NSF graduate fellowships. During his graduate studies, his research focused on increasing the abilities and effectiveness of robotic mobile manipulators performing complex service tasks in unstructured environments with considerations for working alongside human collaborators.

    Host: Pierluigi Nuzzo and Feifei Qian

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_p5OEJlPxQlakO4hqovuGEQ

    Location: Online

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_p5OEJlPxQlakO4hqovuGEQ

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Talyia White

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  • AME Seminar

    Wed, Oct 06, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Diego Donzis, TAMU

    Talk Title: Rethinking Compressible Turbulence: From New Regimes to Extreme Simulations

    Abstract: Compressible turbulence is much more common than incompressible turbulence and plays a critical role in countless natural and engineering systems such as astrophysical flows, high-speed aerodynamics, turbulent combustion, among many others. However, much less is known about compressible turbulence due to its larger parameter space; the additional complexity associated with coupling between hydrodynamics and thermodynamics; and the greater challenges to develop theory, attain realistic conditions in simulations, and conduct carefully controlled experiments.

    In the first part of this talk I will review recent work that highlights some qualitative differences observed in compressible turbulence using a massive database of very well-resolved direct numerical simulations. After some illustrations of specific compressibility effects on turbulent flows, I will show why current approaches as "corrections" to well-known laws in incompressible turbulence present fundamental problems and then `provide a new alternative interpretation of statistical equilibria in an expanded parameter space in which new compressible universal scaling laws can be found. In the second this part, I will present current computational challenges to achieve more realistic conditions and a novel numerical approach in which the main well-known obstacles towards simulations on exascale systems and beyond can be removed. We will present some examples for smooth flows as well as flows with shocks and reactions.

    Biography: Diego A. Donzis is an associate professor and Director of Graduate Programs in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at Texas A&M University where he directs the Turbulence and Advanced Computations Lab (TACL). He received his PhD from the Georgia Institute of Technology and continued his research at the University of Maryland and the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy. His main interests are in high-performance computing at extreme scales, and the physics of turbulence and turbulent mixing in incompressible and compressible flows. Among his major recognitions Dr. Donzis received an NSF CAREER award, the Francois Frenkiel Award from the American Physical Society, TAMU Dean of Engineering Excellence Award, three TEES Faculty Awards for research, the McElmurry Teaching Excellence Award, and is a best graduate from Argentina by the National Academy of Engineering. In 2018, he was named a Presidential Impact Fellow by Texas A&M University for his scholarly influence. He is an AIAA Associate Fellow.

    Host: AME Department

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 202

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Tessa Yao

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  • Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Thu, Oct 07, 2021 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Thanasis Fokas, Adjunct Professor, Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering and at the Department of Biomedical Engineering

    Talk Title: Heat and Wave Equations Revisited: Beyond Fourier and'Alembert

    Abstract: Please see attached abstract and bio.




    Host: Dr. Felipe de Barros

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/99680049945? Passcode: 905716

    More Information: A. Fokas Abstract-bio.pdf

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 526

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Evangeline Reyes

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  • NL Seminar- ROBUST AND IMPLICIT COMMONSENSE INFERENCE FOR SMOOTH COMMUNICATION

    Thu, Oct 07, 2021 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Pei Zhou , USC/ISI

    Talk Title: ROBUST AND IMPLICIT COMMONSENSE INFERENCE FOR SMOOTH COMMUNICATION

    Series: NL Seminar

    Abstract: REMINDER: Meeting hosts only admit guests that they know to the Zoom meeting. Hence, you're highly encouraged to use your USC account to sign into Zoom. If you're an outside visitor, please inform nlg DASH seminar DASH host AT isi.edu beforehand so we'll be aware of your attendance and let you in.

    Smooth and effective communication requires the ability to make implicit commonsense inferences that are robust to paraphrases. In this talk, I will mainly introduce my work on examining whether pre trained language models PTLMs can perform robust commonsense inferences and whether response generation RG models understand why a response sounds coherent. I will briefly present my other work on learning common sense in dialogue response generation.

    In the pursuit of advancing fluid human AI communication, we first propose a new challenge, RICA Robust Inference using Commonsense Axioms, that evaluates robust commonsense inference despite textual perturbations. RICA consists of a set of natural language statements in the premise conclusion format that require reasoning using latent implicit commonsense relationships. We formulate these abstract commonsense relations between entities in first order logic and refer to them as commonsense axioms.

    We also introduce CEDAR Common Sense in Dialogue Response Generation. CEDAR is a probing framework that aims to understand why RG models respond as they do by probing RG models understanding of commonsense reasoning that elicits proper responses. We formalize the problem by framing commonsense as a latent variable in the RG task and using explanations for responses as textual form of commonsense.

    Biography: Pei Zhou is a third year Ph.D. student in Computer Science at the University of Southern California USC and Information Sciences Institute ISI co advised by Professors Xiang Ren and Jay Pujara. Pei graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics of Computation from UCLA in 2019, where he worked closely with Profs. Kai-Wei Chang and Yizhou Sun. In summers of 2021 and 2020, Pei interned as an applied scientist at Amazon Alexa AI, dialogue modeling team. Pei's current research focus lies in commonsense reasoning in dialogue response generation. He is also broadly interested in knowledge grounding in language, robustness, and fairness in NLP.



    Host: Jon May and Thamme Gowda

    More Info: https://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Webcast: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gx1wKxqRy1c

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - Virtual

    WebCast Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gx1wKxqRy1c

    Audiences: NL Seminar

    Contact: Pete Zamar

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  • Ming Hsieh Institute Seminar Series on Integrated Systems

    Fri, Oct 08, 2021 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: David Z. Pan, Professor, The University of Texas at Austin

    Talk Title: Toward Agile and Open-Source Design Automation of Digital/Analog/Mixed-Signal ICs

    Host: Mike Chen, Hossein Hashemi, Manuel Monge, Constantine Sideris

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/94701912463?pwd=eW1KVmhuODFHdHpMemhQbTllMEZ6Zz09

    More Information: MHI IS Seminar - David Pan_Flyer.pdf

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Jenny Lin

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  • Mork Family Department Ph.D. Dissertation Presentation - Minh Tran

    Mon, Oct 11, 2021 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Minh Tran, Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Talk Title: A novel multiphysics coupled framework to model fluid flow, solute transport, and reservoir geomechanics in fractured porous media

    Abstract: Join Zoom Meeting
    https://usc.zoom.us/j/99286039027?pwd=Zncwb2dqUmd4MEZ3NVVMQWNCeW5uUT09

    Meeting ID: 992 8603 9027
    Passcode: 669210

    Despite recent advances in modeling flow and geomechanics coupling, a holistic multiphysics approach to capturing the coupling synergy between fluid flow, injectant transport, induced stresses, and fracture mechanics is lacking. There is a growing interest in developing an integrated multiphysics simulator to investigate physical processes during fluid injection into a fractured reservoir, i.e. injection-induced deformation and stresses, dissolution and spreading of the injected fluid, and convective instabilities originating from the contrast in injected and resident fluid properties, e.g. viscous fingering.

    I develop a holistic computational modeling framework that couples reservoir geomechanics, fluid flow, solvent transport, and fracture dynamics. The first objective is to quantitatively characterize the effect of geomechanical coupling on key macroscopic transport phenomena such as spreading, mixing, and viscous fingering. The second objective is to probe the impact of poroelasticity on the temporal and spatial evolution of embedded fracture networks in terms of induced permeability, dynamic propagation, and fracture interactions. The third objective is to investigate how flow-transport coupling and fracture dynamics modulate the stress state and geomechanical stability of stress-sensitive subsurface formations.

    The findings of this study are relevant in many practical applications such as waste disposal, carbon dioxide sequestration, contaminant transport, enhanced oil recovery, and tracer surveillance.

    Host: Minh Tran

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/99286039027?pwd=Zncwb2dqUmd4MEZ3NVVMQWNCeW5uUT09

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/99286039027?pwd=Zncwb2dqUmd4MEZ3NVVMQWNCeW5uUT09

    More Information: PhD_Defense_Minh_Tran_Flyer.pdf

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/99286039027?pwd=Zncwb2dqUmd4MEZ3NVVMQWNCeW5uUT09

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Greta Harrison

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  • Photonics Seminar Series

    Tue, Oct 12, 2021 @ 01:30 AM - 02:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Jiefei Zhang, Professor University of Southern California

    Talk Title: On-Chip Scalable Ordered Single Photon Sources: A Step Closer to Quantum Optical Circuits

    Series: Photonics Seminar

    Host: Electrical and Computer Engineering: Wade Hsu, Mercedeh Khajavikhan, Michelle Povinelli, Constantine Sideris, and Wei Wu

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/91808071892?pwd=VUwyK3NSNW5rSzVLQzFKSGdPc05yUT09

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/91808071892?pwd=VUwyK3NSNW5rSzVLQzFKSGdPc05yUT09

    More Information: Photonics Seminar _Jiefei Zhang 10-12-21.pdf

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/91808071892?pwd=VUwyK3NSNW5rSzVLQzFKSGdPc05yUT09

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Jennifer Ramos/Electrophysics

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  • ***CANCELLED*** No ISE 651 - Epstein Seminar

    Tue, Oct 12, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Location: Zoom/Online

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Grace Owh

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  • CS Colloquium: Thomas Howard (University of Rochester) - Enabling Grounded Language Communication for Human-Robot Teaming

    Tue, Oct 12, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Thomas Howard, University of Rochester

    Talk Title: Enabling Grounded Language Communication for Human-Robot Teaming

    Series: Computer Science Colloquium

    Abstract: The ability for robots to effectively understand natural language instructions and convey information about their observations and interactions with the physical world is highly dependent on the sophistication and fidelity of the robot's representations of language, environment, and actions. As we progress towards more intelligent systems that perform a wider range of tasks in a greater variety of domains, we need models that can adapt their representations of language and environment to achieve the real-time performance necessitated by the cadence of human-robot interaction within the computational resource constraints of the platform. In this talk I will review my laboratory's research on algorithms and models for robot planning, mapping, control, and interaction with a specific focus on language-guided adaptive perception and bi-directional communication with deliberative interactive estimation.

    Register in advance for this webinar at:
    https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Rf6FW9NNSIWBkuNs9P5EcQ

    After registering, attendees will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium.

    Biography: Thomas Howard is an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Rochester. He also holds secondary appointments in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Computer Science, is an affiliate of the Goergen Institute of Data Science and directs the University of Rochester's Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Previously he held appointments as a research scientist and a postdoctoral associate at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in the Robust Robotics Group, a research technologist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the Robotic Software Systems Group, and a lecturer in mechanical engineering at Caltech.

    Howard earned a PhD in robotics from the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University in 2009 in addition to BS degrees in electrical and computer engineering and mechanical engineering from the University of Rochester in 2004. His research interests span artificial intelligence, robotics, and human-robot interaction with a research focus on improving the optimality, efficiency, and fidelity of models for decision making in complex and unstructured environments with applications to robot motion planning, natural language understanding, and human-robot teaming. Howard was a member of the flight software team for the Mars Science Laboratory, the motion planning lead for the JPL/Caltech DARPA Autonomous Robotic Manipulation team, and a member of Tartan Racing, winner of the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge. Howard has earned Best Paper Awards at RSS (2016) and IEEE SMC (2017), two NASA Group Achievement Awards (2012, 2014), was a finalist for the ICRA Best Manipulation Paper Award (2012) and was selected for the NASA Early Career Faculty Award (2019). Howard's research at the University of Rochester has been supported by National Science Foundation, Army Research Office, Army Research Laboratory, Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the New York State Center of Excellence in Data Science.


    Host: Stefanos Nikolaidis

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Rf6FW9NNSIWBkuNs9P5EcQ

    Location: Online Zoom Webinar

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Rf6FW9NNSIWBkuNs9P5EcQ

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Computer Science Department

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  • Center of Autonomy and AI, Center for Cyber-Physical Systems and the Internet of Things, and Ming Hsieh Institute Seminar Series

    Wed, Oct 13, 2021 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Vasileios Vasilopoulos, Postdoctoral Associate, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) MIT

    Talk Title: Reactive Task and Motion Planning in Unknown Environments

    Series: Center for Cyber-Physical Systems and Internet of Things

    Abstract: Unlike the problem of safe task and motion planning in a completely known environment, the setting where the obstacles in a robot's workspace are not initially known and are incrementally revealed online has so far received little theoretical interest, with existing algorithms usually demanding constant replanning in the presence of unanticipated conditions. In this talk, I will present a hierarchical framework for task and motion planning in the setting of mobile manipulation, which exploits recent developments in semantic SLAM and object pose and triangular mesh extraction using convolutional neural net architectures. Under specific sufficient conditions, formal results accompanying the (online) lower-level vector field motion planner guarantee collision avoidance and convergence to fixed or slowly moving targets, for both a single robot and a robot gripping and manipulating objects. Using this reactive motion planner as a module for high-level task planning, I will discuss how we can efficiently solve geometric rearrangement tasks with legged robots or satisfy complicated temporal logic specifications involving gripping and manipulating objects of interest, in previously unexplored workspaces cluttered with non-convex obstacles.

    Biography: Vasileios is a Postdoctoral Associate at MIT CSAIL, working with Prof. Nicholas Roy. His research focuses on reactive task and motion planning in partially known or completely unknown environments. He is particularly interested in developing algorithms that make autonomous robots capable of interacting with the physical environment around them and solving tasks that require autonomous mobile manipulation. To this end, he frequently employs tools from motion planning, topology and perception. He obtained a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, advised by Dan Koditschek. He also holds a M.S.E. from the University of Pennsylvania and a Diploma from the National Technical University of Athens, both in Mechanical Engineering.



    Host: Pierluigi Nuzzo and Feifei Qian

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_p5OEJlPxQlakO4hqovuGEQ

    Location: Online

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_p5OEJlPxQlakO4hqovuGEQ

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Talyia White

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  • AME Seminar

    Wed, Oct 13, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Ann Karagozian, UCLA

    Talk Title: Dynamics of Acoustically Coupled Combustion Instabilities

    Abstract: Acoustically-coupled combustion instabilities can result in large scale, potentially catastrophic pressure oscillations in aerospace propulsion systems, including liquid rocket engines (LREs) and gas turbine engines. A fundamental understanding of the interactions among flow and flame hydrodynamics, acoustics, and reaction kinetics is essential to determining combustor stability and controlling combustion processes. Over the past several years our group at the UCLA Energy and Propulsion Research Laboratory has been pursuing fundamental experiments that can shed light on combustion instabilities and their control, including exploration of the effects of external acoustic perturbations on liquid nanofuel combustion as well as gas-phase fuel jet combustion for alternative geometrical configurations. The dynamics of phenomena such as periodic liftoff and reattachment, periodic partial extinction and reignition, and full extinction are explored and quantified via phase-locked OH* chemiluminescence and high speed visible imaging. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes and phase portraits extracted from time-resolved imaging enables characterization of characteristic signatures associated with different phenomena. Understanding such signatures enables development of reduced order models that can impact eventual combustion control strategies.

    Biography: Ann Karagozian is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UCLA and heads the UCLA Energy and Propulsion Research Laboratory and the UCLA-Air Force Research Laboratory Collaborative Center for Aerospace Sciences. Her research interests lie in fluid mechanics and combustion as applied to improved energy efficiency, reduced emissions, and advanced air breathing and rocket propulsion systems. Professor Karagozian was a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board for over 15 years, serving as SAB Vice Chair from 2005-2009 and twice receiving the Air Force Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service. She is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Physical Society (APS), and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). She received her B.S. in Engineering from UCLA and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology. She is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) and is an alumna of and mentor for the IDA Defense Science Study Group. Prof. Karagozian also recently became the Inaugural Director of The Promise Armenian Institute, an endowed scholarly and cross-disciplinary outreach entity at UCLA.

    Host: AME Department

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 202

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Tessa Yao

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  • NL Seminar-Chasing the Long Tail. What Neural Networks Memorize and Why

    Thu, Oct 14, 2021 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Vitaly Feldman, Apple AI Research

    Talk Title: Chasing the Long Tail: What Neural Networks Memorize and Why

    Series: NL Seminar

    Abstract: REMINDER: Meeting hosts only admit guests that they know to the Zoom meeting. Hence, you're highly encouraged to use your USC account to sign into Zoom. If you're an outside visitor, please inform nlg DASH seminar DASH host AT isi.edu beforehand so we'll be aware of your attendance and let you in.

    Deep learning algorithms that achieve state of the art results on image and text recognition tasks tend to fit the entire training dataset nearly perfectly including mislabeled examples and outliers. This propensity to memorize seemingly useless data and the resulting large generalization gap have puzzled many practitioners and is not explained by existing theories of machine learning. We provide a simple conceptual explanation and a theoretical model demonstrating that memorization of outliers and mislabeled examples is necessary for achieving close to optimal generalization error when learning from long tailed data distributions. Image and text data are known to follow such distributions and therefore our results establish a formal link between these empirical phenomena. We then demonstrate the utility of memorization and support our explanation empirically. These results rely on a new technique for efficiently estimating memorization and influence of training data points.






    Biography: Vitaly Feldman is a research scientist at Apple AI Research working on foundations of machine learning and privacy preserving data analysis. His recent research interests include tools for analysis of generalization, distributed privacy preserving learning, privacy preserving optimization, and adaptive data analysis.

    Vitaly holds a Ph.D. from Harvard 2006, advised by Leslie Valiant and was previously a research scientist at Google Research Brain Team and IBM Research Almaden. His work was recognized by the COLT Best Student Paper Award in 2005 and 2013 student co authored and by the IBM Research Best Paper Award in 2014, 2015 and 2016. His recent research on foundations of adaptive data analysis has been featured in CACM Research Highlights, Science, and the research blogs of IBM, Google, and Microsoft. He served as a program co chair for COLT 2016 and ALT 2021 conferences and as a co organizer of the Simons Institute Program on Data Privacy in 2019.


    Host: Jon May and Thamme Gowda

    More Info: https://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Webcast: https://youtu.be/_R8JFXvjnPc

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - Virtual Only

    WebCast Link: https://youtu.be/_R8JFXvjnPc

    Audiences: NL Seminar

    Contact: Pete Zamar

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  • Advanced Manufacturing Seminar

    Fri, Oct 15, 2021 @ 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Conrad S. Tucker, Carnegie Mellon University

    Talk Title: Artificial Intelligence and its Impact on Engineering Design and Manufacturing

    Abstract:
    Our research employs artificial intelligence techniques that seek to automate the main time/cost drivers of the engineering design and manufacturing process. The features of a product inform the form, function and behavior of the resulting design concept that can be subsequently created using traditional manufacturing/additive manufacturing methods. While there exists a wide range of computer aided design tools that seek to generate 3D design concepts, they are primarily parametric in nature and rely extensively on designers expertise, which may not always be readily available. Grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) have enabled our research team to explore the use of Deep Generative Design methods such as Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) to generate 3D representations of design concepts. However, there is more to a design than simply its 3D form, as the design must perform a function and operate in an environment where its behavior may/may not perform as intended. Towards this end, our research group has proposed liking the AI-generation of a design, with the automatic evaluation of its function and behavior using physics-based simulation engines. The end result is a physics-informed design that has the potential to be realized through techniques such as additive manufacturing.

    Biography: Dr. Conrad Tucker is an Arthur Hamerschlag Career Development Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Machine Learning (Courtesy) at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on the design and optimization of systems through the acquisition, integration and mining of large scale, disparate data. Dr. Tucker has served as PI/Co-PI on federally/non-federally funded grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), the Office of Naval Research (ONR) via the NSF Center for eDesign, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). In February 2016, he was invited by National Academy of Engineering (NAE) President Dr. Dan Mote, to serve as a member of the Advisory Committee for the NAE Frontiers of Engineering Education (FOEE) Symposium. He received his Ph.D., M.S. (Industrial Engineering), and MBA degrees from the University of Illinois at
    Urbana-Champaign, and his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.

    Host: Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2SihJZ6mR2up1sSa4u_3Jg

    Webcast: Registration Link: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2SihJZ6mR2up1sSa4u_3Jg

    Location: Online event

    WebCast Link: Registration Link: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2SihJZ6mR2up1sSa4u_3Jg

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Tessa Yao

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  • Photonics Seminar Series

    Tue, Oct 19, 2021 @ 01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Jaime Cardenas, University of Rochester

    Talk Title: On-Chip Weak Value Amplification

    Series: Photonics Seminar

    Host: Electrical and Computer Engineering: Wade Hsu, Mercedeh Khajavikhan, Michelle Povinelli, Constantine Sideris, and Wei Wu

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/91808071892?pwd=VUwyK3NSNW5rSzVLQzFKSGdPc05yUT09

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/91808071892?pwd=VUwyK3NSNW5rSzVLQzFKSGdPc05yUT09

    More Information: Photonics Seminar _Jaime Cardenas 10-19-21.pdf

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/91808071892?pwd=VUwyK3NSNW5rSzVLQzFKSGdPc05yUT09

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Jennifer Ramos/Electrophysics

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  • ISE 651 - Epstein Seminar

    Tue, Oct 19, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Jorge Nocedal, Professor, Dept. of Industrial Engr & Management Sciences, Northwestern

    Talk Title: Constrained Optimization in the Presence of Noise

    Host: Dr. Meisam Razaviyayn

    More Information: October 19, 2021.pdf

    Location: Zoom/Online

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Grace Owh

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  • CS Colloquium: Harold Soh (National University of Singapore) - Trust, Talk, and Touch for Human-Robot Interaction

    Tue, Oct 19, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Harold Soh, National University of Singapore

    Talk Title: Trust, Talk, and Touch for Human-Robot Interaction

    Series: Computer Science Colloquium

    Abstract: In this talk, I will present three topics we've been exploring in my lab that bring us towards collaborative robots we trust. Specifically, I will discuss (1) how human trust in a robot transfers across tasks (and methods for modeling this phenomena), (2) how we can use deep self-models for human-robot communication, and if time permits, (3) how robots can extend their tactile perception for physical HRI. A common thread that runs through the topics is that using specified or learned structure can significantly improve sample efficiency. Data can be scarce in robotics and we will end the talk by briefly discussing open problems at the intersection of machine learning and HRI.

    Register in advance for this webinar at:
    https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0MjiSeXvR2-1FfxN0Bq7vg

    After registering, attendees will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium.


    Biography: Harold Soh is Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the National University of Singapore (NUS), where he directs the Collaborative Learning and Adaptive Robots (CLeAR) group. Harold completed his Ph.D. at Imperial College London with Yiannis Demiris on online learning for assistive robots.

    Harold's current research focuses on machine learning and decision-making for trustworthy collaborative robots. His work spans cognitive modeling (specifically human-robot trust) to physical systems (tactile intelligence with novel e-skins), and has been recognized with best paper award nominations at RSS, HRI, and IROS. Harold has served on the HRI committee as LBR Co-Chair (2019) and on the Technical Advances PC as a member (2020) and Chair (2021). He is an Associate Editor of the ACM Transactions on Human Robot Interaction (2021). He serves as PC member / reviewer for the top publication venues in AI (NeurIPS, ICML, ICLR, AAAI) and robotics (ICRA, IROS, RSS, HRI).


    Host: Stefanos Nikolaidis

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0MjiSeXvR2-1FfxN0Bq7vg

    Location: Online Zoom Webinar

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0MjiSeXvR2-1FfxN0Bq7vg

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Computer Science Department

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  • AME Seminar

    Wed, Oct 20, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Alban Sauret, UCSB

    Talk Title: Capillary Flows of Suspensions

    Abstract: Interfacial flows of multiphase systems containing a dispersed solid or liquid phase occur in a broad range of manufacturing, environmental, and bioengineering processes. However, the classical capillary dynamics is strongly modified when the length scale of the liquid becomes comparable to the particle size. This configuration may lead to a failure of classical models based on a rheological approach. For instance, particles can destabilize thin-films, lead to defects in additive manufacturing, reduce transport efficiency, and result in the contamination of substrates.

    In this talk, I will present some of our recent studies that characterize the role of interfaces in suspension dynamics. I will first describe the formation of a thin-film of suspension on a substrate to illustrate how the particles are entrained and deposited depending on the flow configuration and suspension properties. I will discuss how these results can be used to develop passive capillary filtering and sorting mechanisms. The second part of the talk will characterize how particles can modify the formation of droplets and the atomization of suspension sheets and ligaments. Our approach, bridging different length and time scales, describes how the bulk behavior and local heterogeneities contribute to the dynamics of multiphase capillary objects.

    Biography: Alban Sauret is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UC Santa Barbara. He graduated with a BS and an MS in Physics from ENS Lyon (France) and earned a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Aix-Marseille (France) in 2013. During his graduate studies, he was awarded a Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Fellowship from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He then worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Princeton University from 2013 to 2014 and then spent four years as a tenured CNRS Research Scientist in a joint academic and industrial laboratory, while also being a visiting research scholar at NYU Tandon School of Engineering. He joined UC Santa Barbara in 2018. His research aims at understanding the dynamics of multiphase systems. He is particularly interested in the couplings between the fluid dynamics, interfacial effects, and particle transport mechanisms involved in environmental and industrial processes. Alban Sauret was named a Soft Matter Emerging Investigators in 2017, was elected a UC Regents Junior Faculty Fellow in 2019, and received the NSF CAREER Award in 2020. His past results were highlighted in various media, including the Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Science Friday.

    Host: AME Department

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 202

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Tessa Yao

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Thu, Oct 21, 2021 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Augustine Zvinavashe, Ph.D. Candidate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Talk Title: A Bioinspired Approach to Engineer the Seed Microenvironment

    Abstract: Please see attached abstract and bio.

    Host: Dr. Adam Smith

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/99680049945 Meeting ID: 996 8004 9945 Passcode: 905716

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 526

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/99680049945 Meeting ID: 996 8004 9945 Passcode: 905716

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Evangeline Reyes

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  • CS Colloquium: Huan Liu (Arizona State University) - Social Media Mining: A Bountiful Frontier in AI

    Thu, Oct 21, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Huan Liu , Arizona State University

    Talk Title: Social Media Mining: A Bountiful Frontier in AI

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Social media data differs from conventional data in many ways. It is not only big, but also noisy, linked, multimodal, and user-generated. Unprecedented opportunities thus emerge for CS and AI research through the lens of social data. In this talk, I use examples to illustrate: (1) fundamental problems associated with social media, that challenge common practice and existential understanding in machine learning and data mining; (2) intriguing questions, unique to social media, that can be answered by mining social media; and (3) how we can make a difference -“ that is, contribute to society at large - by developing novel socially responsible AI algorithms in our work on social media mining and AI. There are great opportunities ahead for research, teaching, and interdisciplinary collaborations in advancing knowledge in CS, AI, and data science.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium

    Biography: Dr. Huan Liu is Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Arizona State University. He was recognized for excellence in teaching and research in Computer Science and Engineering at ASU. His research interests include AI, data mining, feature selection, and social media mining. He co-authored the textbook, Social Media Mining: An Introduction, by Cambridge University Press. He graduated 32 PhD students at ASU and many of them won highly coveted awards (click here for their first job after graduation). He is Founding Field Chief Editor of Frontiers in Big Data, its Specialty Chief Editor of Data Mining and Management, Editor in Chief of ACM TIST, and Conference Co-Chair of ACM WSMD2022. His research has been funded by NSF, AFOSR, AFRL, ARL, ARO, DARPA, NASA, and ONR, among others. He is a Fellow of AAAI, AAAS, ACM, and IEEE.

    Host: Laurent Itti

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 115

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • ***NO ISE 651, Epstein Seminar - Week of INFORMS***

    Tue, Oct 26, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Grace Owh

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  • AME Seminar

    Wed, Oct 27, 2021 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: David Steigmann, UC Berkeley

    Talk Title: TBD

    Host: AME Department

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Location: Seaver Science Library (SSL) - 202

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/97427241653?pwd=UGd2aXY2b3dsQkxMdzdvcnNBMjRJZz09

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Tessa Yao

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Thu, Oct 28, 2021 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Ioannis A. Kougioumtzoglou, Columbia University

    Talk Title: Path Integrals in Stochastic Engineering Dynamics

    Abstract: Please see attached Abstract and Bio.

    Host: Dr. Roger Ghanem

    More Information: USC_Kougioumtzoglou2.pdf

    Location: Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience (MCB) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Evangeline Reyes

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