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Events for the 2nd week of March

  • CS Colloquium: Adish Singla (ETH Zurich) - Learning With and From People

    Mon, Mar 06, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Adish Singla, ETH Zurich

    Talk Title: Learning With and From People

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium.

    People are becoming an integral part of computational systems, fueled primarily by recent technological advancements as well as deep-seated economic and societal changes. Consequently, there is a pressing need to design new data science and machine learning frameworks that can tackle challenges arising from human participation (e.g. questions about incentives and users' privacy) and can leverage people's capabilities (e.g. ability to learn).

    In this talk, I will share my research efforts at the confluence of people and computing to address real-world problems. Specifically, I will focus on collaborative consumption systems (e.g. shared mobility systems and sharing economy marketplaces like Airbnb) and showcase the need to actively engage users for shaping the demand who would otherwise act primarily in their own interest. The main idea of engaging users is to incentivize them to switch to alternate choices that would improve the system's effectiveness. To offer optimized incentives, I will present novel multi-armed bandit algorithms and online learning methods in structured spaces for learning users' costs for switching between different pairs of available choices. Furthermore, to tackle the challenges of data sparsity and to speed up learning, I will introduce hemimetrics as a structural constraint over users' preferences. I will show experimental results of applying the proposed algorithms on two real-world applications: incentivizing users to explore unreviewed hosts on services like Airbnb and tackling the imbalance problem in bike sharing systems. In collaboration with an ETH Zurich spinoff and a public transport operator in the city of Mainz, Germany, we deployed these algorithms via a smartphone app among users of a bike sharing system. I will share the findings from this deployment.

    Biography: Adish Singla is a PhD student in the Learning and Adaptive Systems Group at ETH Zurich. His research focuses on designing new machine learning frameworks and developing algorithmic techniques, particularly for situations where people are an integral part of computational systems. Before starting his PhD, he worked as a Senior Development Lead in Bing Search for over three years. He is a recipient of the Facebook Fellowship in the area of Machine Learning, Microsoft Research Tech Transfer Award, and Microsoft Gold Star Award.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 217

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Mon, Mar 06, 2017 @ 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

    Alfred E. Mann Department of Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Wei Wu, PhD, Associate Professor, USC Viterbi Electrical Engineering/Electrophysics

    Talk Title: Sub-5 nm Patterning and Applications

    Host: Qifa Zhou

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 122

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Center for Cyber-Physical Systems and Internet of Things and Ming Hsieh Institute for Electrical Engineering Joint Seminar Series on Cyber-Physical Systems

    Mon, Mar 06, 2017 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Aranya Chakrabortty, Associate Professor, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

    Talk Title: Cyber-Physical Challenges for Wide-Area Control of Power Systems

    Abstract: In this talk I will present a novel cyber-physical architecture for wide-area control of power systems using massive volumes of Synchrophasor data. The first half of the talk will focus on the computational aspects of the control design, where I will present several recent results on a new design approach called "control inversion". By this approach, very large-dimensional power system models can be projected conveniently into lower dimensional spaces by exploiting the inherent clustering properties of the network dynamics; then, a reduced-order controller is designed for this simple model, and, finally, this controller is projected back to the full-dimensional network for actual implementation. The method not only improves the tractability of the design, but also provides significant savings in the number of communication links needed for feedback. In the second half of the talk, I will shift my attention towards two of the most important challenges in data communication arising in wide-area control- namely, sensitivity to delays and data sparsification. Using the concepts of modal participation factors and relative gain arrays, I will propose a distributed communication architecture by which control centers can implement a sparse realization of wide-area controllers with very little loss in the overall response. I will also describe a co-design strategy by which one can spot the most important generators in the system for the purpose of oscillation damping after any disturbance in real-time, and, thereafter, prioritize the communication of states from these special generators to minimize the overall delay in the feedback path. I will present simulations to illustrate the pros and cons of such data prioritization, and their associated protocol designs. The talk will end with some final remarks about the resilience of these wide-area protocols against denial-of-service and data manipulation attacks.

    The overall goal of the talk will be to pinpoint some of the most challenging CPS problems for today's grid where power engineers can largely benefit from collaborations with communication engineers, computer scientists, and numerical analysts. The content will highlight my recent works with PhD students Nan Xue and Abhishek Jain at NC State, as well as my work with Dr. Anuradha Annaswamy and her postdocs from MIT.


    Biography: Aranya Chakrabortty received his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, in 2008. Following that he was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Washington Seattle, for a year. From 2009 to 2010, he was an Assistant Professor at Texas Tech University. Since 2010, Aranya has joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering department of North Carolina State University, where he is currently an Associate Professor. His research interests are in the general area of power system dynamics, modeling, stability, and control, with a special focus on wide-area monitoring and control using Synchrophasors. He is a senior member of IEEE, and currently serves as an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology. He received the NSF CAREER award in 2011.

    Host: Paul Bogdan

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Estela Lopez

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  • Schlumberger Information Session

    Mon, Mar 06, 2017 @ 06:30 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Learn about possible internships and career opportunities with company representatives!

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 101

    Audiences: All Viterbi

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • CS Colloquium: Philip Thomas (CMU) - Safe Machine Learning

    Tue, Mar 07, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Philip Thomas, Carnegie Mellon University

    Talk Title: Safe Machine Learning

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium.

    Machine learning algorithms are everywhere, ranging from simple data analysis and pattern recognition tools used across the sciences to complex systems that achieve super-human performance on various tasks. Ensuring that they are safe-”that they do not, for example, cause harm to humans or act in a racist or sexist way-”is therefore not a hypothetical problem to be dealt with in the future, but a pressing one that we can and should address now.

    In this talk I will discuss some of my recent efforts to develop safe machine learning algorithms, and particularly safe reinforcement learning algorithms, which can be responsibly applied to high-risk applications. I will focus on a specific research problem that is central to the design of safe reinforcement learning algorithms: accurately predicting how well a policy would perform if it were to be used, given data collected from the deployment of a different policy. Solutions to this problem provide a way to determine that a newly proposed policy would be dangerous to use without requiring the dangerous policy to ever actually be used.

    Biography: Philip Thomas is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University, advised by Emma Brunskill. He received his Ph.D. from the College of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2015, where he was advised by Andrew Barto. Prior to that, Philip received his B.S. and M.S. in computer science from Case Western Reserve University in 2008 and 2009, respectively, where Michael Branicky was his adviser. Philip's research interests are in machine learning with emphases on reinforcement learning, safety, and designing algorithms that have practical theoretical guarantees.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 217

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • INFORMATION DROPOUT: LEARNING OPTIMAL REPRESENTATIONS THROUGH NOISY COMPUTATION

    Tue, Mar 07, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Alessandro Achille, UCLA

    Talk Title: INFORMATION DROPOUT: LEARNING OPTIMAL REPRESENTATIONS THROUGH NOISY COMPUTATION

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: The cross-entropy loss commonly used in deep learning is closely related to the information theoretic properties defining an optimal representation of the data, but does not enforce some of the key properties. We show that this can be solved by adding a regularization term, which is in turn related to injecting multiplicative noise in the activations of a Deep Neural Network, a special case of which is the common practice of dropout. Our regularized loss function can be efficiently minimized using Information Dropout, a generalization of dropout rooted in information theoretic principles that automatically adapts to the data and can better exploit architectures of limited capacity.
    When the task is the reconstruction of the input, we show that our loss function yields a Variational Autoencoder as a special case, thus providing a link between representation learning, information theory and variational inference. Finally, we prove that we can promote the creation of disentangled representations of the input simply by enforcing a factorized prior, a fact that has been also observed empirically in recent work.
    Our experiments validate the theoretical intuitions behind our method, and we find that Information Dropout achieves a comparable or better generalization performance than binary dropout, especially on smaller models, since it can automatically adapt the noise structure to the architecture of the network, as well as to the test sample.




    Biography: Alessandro Achille is a PhD student in Computer Science at UCLA, working with Prof. Stefano Soatto. He focuses on variational inference, representation learning, and their applications to deep learning and computer vision. Before coming to UCLA, he obtained a Master's degree in Pure Math at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, where he studied model theory and algebraic topology with Prof. Alessandro Berarducci.


    Host: Greg Ver Steeg

    More Info: https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.01353

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 6th Flr -CR#689 (ISI/Marina Del Rey)

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Peter Zamar

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  • Epstein Seminar, ISE 651

    Tue, Mar 07, 2017 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Daniel Robinson, Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University

    Talk Title: Scalable Optimization Algorithms For Large-Scale Subspace Clustering

    Host: Jong-Shi Pang

    More Information: March 7, 2017_Robinson.pdf

    Location: Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center (GER) - 206

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Grace Owh

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  • Introduction to Viterbi Gateway Workshop

    Tue, Mar 07, 2017 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Come to this presentation to learn how to navigate the Viterbi Career Gateway,a powerful job & internship search tool available ONLY to Viterbi students.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: All Viterbi

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • HackForHealth - Infosession

    Wed, Mar 08, 2017 @ 06:00 AM - 08:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Dear Trojan Family,

    In the spirit of the National Cancer Moonshot, The Kuhn Lab at USC is calling upon all Trojans to join to HackForHealth. Together we will spend a weekend building meaningful solutions to the problems that cancer patients and researchers face everyday. All are welcome, regardless of medical background or technical expertise.
    HackForHealth is a cancer-focused hackathon organized by the diverse team of researchers, physicians, students, and patients behind CancerBase -” a digital tool for cancer patients to securely track and share their medical data, powering research into the progression and treatment of cancer. We hope that you can join us from April 7-9 to interact with members of the cancer community and hack together solutions to help them, whether it be an app, website, gadget, or sketch. Projects will be judged by representatives from the National Cancer Institute. The prizes include cash and internship opportunities.

    Register today and let's beat cancer together!

    www.hackforhealth.co

    To learn more about HackForHealth, please attended one of our information sessions:

    UPC: March 8th, 2017 - 6pm at THH 202
    HSC: March 15th, 2017 - 6pm at NRT LG 503

    More Information: H4Hposter final.pdf

    Location: Mark Taper Hall Of Humanities (THH) - 202

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Ryan Rozan

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  • Careers in Data Science and Data Engineering Infosession

    Wed, Mar 08, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Careers in Data Science and Data Engineering

    Wednesday March 8th
    11am-12pm
    KAP-140

    David Drummond, Director of Data Engineering at Insight Data Science will be leading a discussion on careers in data science, health data science, artificial intelligence, and data engineering.

    The Insight Fellows Program is a training fellowship designed to bridge the gap between academia and a career in data. Insight provides seven-week, full-time, training fellowships in Silicon Valley, New York and Boston. They offer a tuition-free Fellowship, dedicated office space, and project-based learning under the guidance of top industry mentors. Over 800 Insight alumni are now working at Facebook, Apple, LinkedIn, Uber, Netflix, Bloomberg, athenahealth, Merck, Optum Labs, Biogen and other top companies.

    In this info session, we will provide a high-level overview of data trends in industry and describe the Insight Fellows Program. The session will include time for Q&A, and advice for those interested in transitioning to careers in data science and data engineering, including steps you can take now to make yourself more prepared for data roles when you graduate. Learn more at: insightdatascience.com and insightdataengineering.com

    Location: Kaprielian Hall (KAP) - 140

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Ryan Rozan

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  • Computer Science General Faculty Meeting

    Wed, Mar 08, 2017 @ 12:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Receptions & Special Events


    Bi-Weekly regular faculty meeting for invited full-time Computer Science faculty only. Event details emailed directly to attendees.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 526

    Audiences: Invited Faculty Only

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • The Art of Networking

    Wed, Mar 08, 2017 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections, Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Networking is not simply about the exchange of business cards. It is about developing meaningful relationships with others, such as potential mentors, collaborators, peers, alumni or professional contacts. Learn the art of networking at this workshop, which will cover tips, strategies, and resources.

    To join the workshop, go to https://bluejeans.com/100280845 at the workshop start time and login with your USC netID and password.

    WebCast Link: https://bluejeans.com/100280845

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Kaitlin Harada

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  • AME/ASTE Viterbi Alumni & Industry Spotlight

    Wed, Mar 08, 2017 @ 07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Students will hear from alumni and industry representatives regarding their academic/professional experiences.
    Free Pizza!

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: Undergrad

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • CS Colloquium: David Naylor (CMU) - Privacy in the Internet (Without Giving up Everything Else)

    Thu, Mar 09, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: David Naylor, Carnegie Mellon University

    Talk Title: Privacy in the Internet (Without Giving up Everything Else)

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Computer Science Research Colloquium.

    Using the Internet inherently entails privacy risks. Each packet, potentially carrying information that users would rather keep private, is exposed to a network infrastructure operated by a number of third parties the user may not trust and likely cannot even identify. In some cases, the user may not even trust the recipient.

    Techniques exist to protect user privacy, but they typically do so at the expense of other desirable properties. For example, anonymity services like Tor hide a packet's true sender, but weaken accountability by making it difficult for network administrators or law enforcement to track down malicious senders. Similarly, encryption hides application data from third parties, but prevents the use of middleboxes---devices that process packets in the network to improve performance (like caches) or security (like intrusion detection systems).

    In this talk, I'll present techniques for managing these "Privacy vs. X" conflicts, including a new network architecture that re-thinks basic networking building blocks like packet source addresses and new secure communication protocols that explicitly balance data privacy with the benefits of middleboxes.

    Biography: David is a Ph.D. student at Carnegie Mellon University, where he is advised by Peter Steenkiste. His primary research interests are computer networking, security, and privacy, but he is also interested in Web measurement and performance (http://isthewebhttp2yet.com and https://eyeorg.net). David received his B.S. from the University of Iowa in 2011, where he created the DDR inspired "Scrub Scrub Revolution," a handwashing training game for healthcare professionals. He is an NDSEG fellow and received an ACM SIGCOMM best paper award.

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 217

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Seminar

    Thu, Mar 09, 2017 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Hung-Wei Tseng, NC State University

    Talk Title: Modernizing Storage Systems for Big Data Applications

    Abstract: Existing high-speed non-volatile storage systems leverage entrenched system stack developed for magnetic hard disk drive, leading to suboptimal performance and under-utilized system resources. As data set sizes of applications keep increasing, using conventional system stack for modern storage devices becomes a new performance bottleneck. For example, a database system can spend 80% of time in just fetching data from the storage system, leaving precious computing resource idle at the same time.

    To improve the performance of serving data from storage systems, we need to revisit the block-based storage interface designed for slower, magnetic disk drives. In this talk, Hung-Wei will share his experience in modernizing the hardware/software interface for storage systems and achieve performance gain in computer systems. Hung-Wei will introduce his research projects including: (1) HippogriffDB, a GPU-based database system that balances the huge gap between the throughputs of the GPU and the SSD. (2) Morpheus-SSD that utilizes computing resources inside storage devices to create more efficient applications. (3) KAML that modernizes the conventional block-based I/O with a keyvalue-like interface.


    Biography: Hung-Wei is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NC State University where he is now leading the Extreme Storage & Computer Architecture Laboratory. Prior to joining NCSU, Hung-Wei was a postdoctoral scholar of the Non-volatile Systems Laboratory with Professor Steven Swanson and a lecturer of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at University of California, San Diego. His thesis work with Professor Dean Tullsen, data-triggered threads, was selected by IEEE Micro "Top Picks from Computer Architecture" in 2012.

    Host: Murali Annavaram

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Estela Lopez

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  • Lyman L. Handy Colloquia

    Thu, Mar 09, 2017 @ 12:45 PM - 01:50 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Ronnie Borja , Stanford University

    Talk Title: A constitutive framework for double-porosity materials with evolving internal structure

    Series: Lyman Handy Colloquia

    Host: Professor Birendra Jha

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 159

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Martin Olekszyk

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  • PhD Defense - Lian Liu

    Thu, Mar 09, 2017 @ 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Computer Science

    University Calendar


    PhD Candidate: Lian Liu

    Committee: Ming-Deh Huang (CS, chair), Sheldon Ross (ISE), Shang-Hua Teng (CS)

    Title: Expander Cayley Graphs over Finite Strings and Pseudorandomness

    Time: March 9 (Thursday) 2:00 - 3:30 pm.

    Room: SAL 322 (i.e. the conference room on the 3rd floor of SAL)


    Abstract:

    We present an explicit construction of expander Cayley graphs over the direct sum of multiple copies of Z/pZ, where p is a prime number. So far as we know, our work is the first expander Cayley graph construction over such groups. Our construction consists of two phases. In the first phase, we consider Cayley graphs over the multiplicative groups of algebras over finite fields. We prove that for some well-chosen small generating sets which can be computed in polynomial time, the induced Cayley graphs are expanding. In the second phase, we construct an new Cayley graph by projecting the graph created in the first phase onto a direct component of the underlying group. We showed that the component on which the graph is projected is isomorphic to the direct sum of multiple copies of Z/pZ, and the resulting Cayley graph is a good expander. Interestingly, we found that many expander graphs whose degrees are not of any special forms can be explicitly constructed under this framework, which could be regarded as a tiny progress towards the open problem of constructing infinite families of Ramanujan graphs of every degree.

    An special case of particular interest is when p equals 2. In this situation, the vertices of such a graph naturally correspond to bit strings of a fixed length, and each edge represents a transition between two bit strings under standard exclusive-or operation. As an application, we then propose a simple pseudorandom generator based on random walks on the graph. An important question is whether our pseudorandom generator is indistinguishable from a truly random source under probabilistic polynomial time attacks, which, however, remains open. In fact, constructing a secure and efficient pseudorandom generator has been an open problem since the birth of modern cryptography, whose solution may lead to huge breakthroughs in computer science. Therefore, our goal here is not addressing this problem, even partially. Instead, along with our discussion, we demonstrate that our expander Cayley graphs have some appealing features that all previous constructions do not have. These new features might bring a lot of potential topics for future research.

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 322

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Lizsl De Leon

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  • Viterbi Distinguished Lecture

    Thu, Mar 09, 2017 @ 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Professor Peter Shor, MIT

    Talk Title: Capacities for Quantum Communication Channels

    Series: Viterbi Lecture

    Abstract: In 1948, Shannon discovered his famous formula for the capacity of a communication channel. This formula does not apply, however, to channels with significant quantum effects. For quantum channels, the question of capacity is much more complicated, as there are different capacities for sending classical information and for sending quantum information. We will discuss the capacities of quantum channels, and survey the historical development of the subject.

    Biography: Peter Shor received a B.S. in Mathematics from Caltech in 1981, and a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from M.I.T. After a one-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in Berkeley, he took a job at AT&T Bell Laboratories, and stayed at AT&T until 2003. In 2003, he went to M.I.T., where he is the Morss Professor of Applied Mathematics.

    Until 1994, he worked on algorithms for conventional computers and did research in probability and combinatorics. In 1994, after thinking about the problem on and off for nearly a year, he discovered an algorithm for factoring large integers into primes on a quantum computer (still hypothetical, but steadily becoming less so). Since then, he has mainly been investigating quantum computing and quantum information theory.

    Among other awards, he has received the Nevanlinna Prize, the Goedel prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Host: Professor Sandeep K. Gupta

    Webcast: https://bluejeans.com/547084462

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 132

    WebCast Link: https://bluejeans.com/547084462

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Mayumi Thrasher

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  • Interviewing Strategies and Techniques

    Thu, Mar 09, 2017 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Discover tips on how to prepare for both technical and behavioral interviews, as well as the proper steps for follow-up!

    To join the workshop, go to https://bluejeans.com/269138699 at the workshop start time and login with your USC netID and password at the workshop start time and login with your USC netID and password.

    WebCast Link: https://bluejeans.com/269138699

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • CS Invited Lecture: Richard Anfang - Life Lessons of a Wall St. CIO

    Fri, Mar 10, 2017 @ 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Richard Anfang,

    Talk Title: Life Lessons of a Wall St. CIO

    Abstract: Please join special Guest Lecturer, CIO Richard Anfang, as he shares technology experience and insight from his 30+ year career on Wall Street. Open to all CS students

    Richard will discuss technology, innovation, business strategy, and talent. He will also provide valuable career advice and his thoughts on the importance of mentorship.

    Biography: Richard Anfang is a technology executive with over 30 years of experience working in global financial service organizations. He has held senior management positions as a business-aligned Chief Information Officer, managed enterprise technology infrastructure, and partnered closely with C-level executives. Anfang has an extensive track record delivering innovative technology solutions to solve business problems within the financial services sector.

    Most recently, he worked at JPMorgan Chase where he was Chief Architect of the firm's Global Technology Infrastructure organization. From 2013 to early 2014, he was the Chief Information Officer of JPMorgan's Asset Management business. He was responsible for the business' strategic leadership of technology, overseeing over 3,000 technologists globally spanning the firm's global Investment Management and Private Bank businesses. From 2008 to 2012, he was the Chief Information Officer of JPMorgan's Worldwide Securities Services business.

    Prior to joining JPMorgan, he spent over 24 years at Morgan Stanley. During that time, he held a number of senior Information Technology positions including Chief Technology Officer of the Prime Brokerage business, global head of the firm's Enterprise Infrastructure group, head of Equity and Fixed Income Sales & Trading applications development, and Chief Information Officer of Morgan Stanley's UK and European businesses.

    Anfang has an extensive track record of delivering innovative solutions and solving business problems in the financial services industry. He has served on the advisory board of several technology service providers and has participated in numerous industry forums and committees.

    He holds a Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Pennsylvania (1983) and a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Michigan (1981).

    Host: CS Department

    Location: Grace Ford Salvatori Hall Of Letters, Arts & Sciences (GFS) - 116

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • W.V.T. Rusch Engineering Honors Program Colloquium

    Fri, Mar 10, 2017 @ 01:00 PM - 01:50 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering, Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    University Calendar


    Join us for a presentation by Prof. David Prober, Division of Biology at California Institute of Technology, titled "Using Fish to Understand How and Why We Sleep."

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 101

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Ramon Borunda/Academic Services

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  • Seminars in Biomedical Engineering

    Fri, Mar 10, 2017 @ 02:00 PM - 03:50 PM

    Alfred E. Mann Department of Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Muyinatu , Assistant Professor & PULSE Lab Director, Johns Hopkins (Whiting School of Engineering)

    Talk Title: TBA

    Series: Distinguished Speaker Series, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

    Biography: Biography: Dr. Muyinatu A. Lediju Bell (informally known as "Bisi") is an assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering with a joint appointment in the Biomedical Engineering Department. Dr. Bell obtained a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Duke University and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering (BME minor) from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In addition, Dr. Bell spent a year abroad as a Whitaker International Fellow, conducting research at the Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital in the United Kingdom. Prior to joining the faculty, Dr. Bell was a postdoctoral fellow with the Engineering Research Center for Computer-Integrated Surgical Systems and Technology at Johns Hopkins University. She published over 40 scientific journal articles and conference papers, holds a patent for SLSC beamforming, and is the recipient of numerous awards, grants, and fellowships, including the prestigious NIH K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award and the esteemed MIT Technology Review 35 Innovators Under 35 Award.


    Location: Corwin D. Denney Research Center (DRB) - 146

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Mischalgrace Diasanta

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  • Ming Hsieh Institute Seminar Series on Integrated Systems

    Fri, Mar 10, 2017 @ 02:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Timothy O. Dickson, Research Staff Member, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center

    Talk Title: Breaking from Tradition: New Approaches in CMOS Wireline Transceivers for 28-56Gb/s Serial Links

    Host: Profs. Hossein Hashemi, Mike Chen, Dina El-Damak, and Mahta Moghaddam

    More Information: MHI Seminar Series IS - Timothy Dickson.pdf

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Jenny Lin

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  • Learning agents that interact with humans

    Fri, Mar 10, 2017 @ 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: He He, Stanford Univ.

    Talk Title: Learning agents that interact with humans

    Series: Natural Language Seminar

    Abstract: The future of virtual assistants, self driving cars, and smart homes require intelligent agents that work intimately with users. Instead of passively following orders given by users, an interactive agent must actively collaborate with people through communication, coordination, and user adaptation. In this talk, I will present our recent work towards building agents that interact with humans. First, we propose a symmetric collaborative dialogue setting in which two agents, each with some private knowledge, must communicate in natural language to achieve a common goal. We present a human-human dialogue dataset that poses new challenges to existing models, and propose a neural model with dynamic knowledge graph embedding. Second, we study the user-adaptation problem in quizbowl - a competitive, incremental question answering game. We show that explicitly modeling of different human behavior leads to more effective policies that exploits sub optimal players. I will conclude by discussing opportunities and open questions in learning interactive agents.


    Biography: He He is a post-doc at Stanford University, working with Percy Liang. Prior to Stanford, she earned her Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Maryland, College Park, advised by Hal Daume III and Jordan Boyd Graber. Her interests are at the interface of machine learning and natural language processing. She develops algorithms that acquire information dynamically and do inference incrementally, with an emphasis on problems in natural language processing. She has worked on dependency parsing, simultaneous machine translation, question answering, and more recently dialogue systems.

    Host: Marjan Ghazvininejad and Kevin Knight

    More Info: http://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - 11th Flr Conf Rm # 1135, Marina Del Rey

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Peter Zamar

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  • 2017 William G. Spitzer Lecture

    Fri, Mar 10, 2017 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Prof. Supratik Guha, The Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago

    Talk Title: Nano-materials for Practical Applications: Opportunities in Computing and Cyberphysical Sensing Networks

    Host: Dr. Anupam Madhukar

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 123

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Aleessa Atienza

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