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Events for the 1st week of September

  • Repeating EventCommunications Hub: Writing and Speaking for PhD Students - Drop In Hours

    Mon, Aug 28, 2023 @ 10:00 AM - 01:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Viterbi Ph.D. Students!
    Need help with academic and professional writing and speaking tasks? Viterbi faculty at the Hub provide one-on-one help with journal and conference articles, dissertations, fellowship applications, and career communications!
    Drop by RTH 222A on MWF 10am-1pm or make an online appointment via email at eishub@usc.edu.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 222A

    Audiences: Graduate

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    Contact: Helen Choi

    Event Link: https://sites.google.com/usc.edu/eishub/home

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  • Find Your Dream Job or Internship

    Tue, Aug 29, 2023 @ 12:00 PM - 01:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    THIS EVENT WILL BE HOSTED HYBRID: IN-PERSON & ONLINE SIMULTANEOUSLY

    Increase your knowledge on the job/internship search by attending this professional development Q&A moderated by Viterbi Career Connections staff or Viterbi employer partners.

    To access the ZOOM link and for more information on this workshop, log into Viterbi Career Gateway>> Events>>Workshops: https://shibboleth-viterbi-usc-csm.symplicity.com/sso/

    For more information about all workshops, please visit viterbicareers.usc.edu/workshops.

    For In-Person: Attendance is limited to room capacity

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Epstein Institute, ISE 651 Seminar Class

    Tue, Aug 29, 2023 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Joseph Nuamah , Assistant Professor, Department of Industrial Engineering & Management, Oklahoma State University

    Talk Title: Improving Human-System Interaction via Wearable Physiological Monitoring

    Host: Dr. Andrea Belz

    Location: SOS Building, B2

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Grace Owh

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  • Repeating EventCommunications Hub: Writing and Speaking for PhD Students - Drop In Hours

    Wed, Aug 30, 2023 @ 10:00 AM - 01:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Viterbi Ph.D. Students!
    Need help with academic and professional writing and speaking tasks? Viterbi faculty at the Hub provide one-on-one help with journal and conference articles, dissertations, fellowship applications, and career communications!
    Drop by RTH 222A on MWF 10am-1pm or make an online appointment via email at eishub@usc.edu.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 222A

    Audiences: Graduate

    View All Dates

    Contact: Helen Choi

    Event Link: https://sites.google.com/usc.edu/eishub/home

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  • Viterbi How to Get Hired Series: Employer Workshops

    Wed, Aug 30, 2023 @ 11:00 AM - 03:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Mark your calendar to attend the Employer/Alumni-led professional development series, How To Get Hired (HTGH), to prepare for this fall recruiting season. This is your opportunity to connect with employers & alumni and learn what it takes to Get Hired directly from industry experts!

    HTGH workshops will take place Virtually or On-Campus.

    Workshops schedule:

    Time: 11:00 am-12:00 pm | Who Gets Hired: How to Make the Most of the Career Fair - Presented by Lockheed Martin
    Time: 12:00 pm-1:00 pm | Writing a Strong Resume - Presented by Northrop Grumman Corporation
    Time: 2:00 pm-3:00 pm | Building Professional Connections - Presented by Qvest.US

    RSVP through Viterbi Career Gateway >>Events>>Workshops

    Log into Viterbi Career Gateway: https://shibboleth-viterbi-usc-csm.symplicity.com/sso

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 211

    Audiences: All Viterbi Students

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • DEN@Viterbi - Online Graduate Engineering Virtual Information Session

    Wed, Aug 30, 2023 @ 12:00 PM - 01:00 PM

    DEN@Viterbi, Viterbi School of Engineering Graduate Admission

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Join USC Viterbi School of Engineering for a virtual information session via WebEx, providing an introduction to DEN@Viterbi, our top-ranked online delivery system. Discover the 40+ graduate engineering and computer science programs available entirely online.

    Attendees will have the opportunity to connect directly with USC Viterbi representatives during the session to discuss the admission process, program details, and the benefits of online delivery.

    Register Today!


    WebCast Link: https://uscviterbi.webex.com/weblink/register/r61d366365bab39d33af05b79385e52f8

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Corporate & Professional Programs

    Event Link: https://uscviterbi.webex.com/weblink/register/r61d366365bab39d33af05b79385e52f8

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  • AME Seminar - Laufer Lecture

    Wed, Aug 30, 2023 @ 12:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Howard Stone, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton University

    Talk Title: Thin-Film Flows: From Similarity Solutions to New Insights in Molecular Biology

    Abstract: Fluid mechanics has a rich history, as of course does mechanics more generally. The ideas bridge science and engineering disciplines, even as they generate new fundamental research questions in fluid mechanics. In this talk I sketch some recent themes* from my research group, which bridge a wide range of length scales. First, I give a brief survey of some of the fluid mechanics problems that we have been investigating in recent years. Second, whereas traditional similarity solutions in course work and research typically involve nonlinear equations with two independent variables, I will illustrate an experimentally motivated similarity solution involving three independent variables, for which we construct an analytical solution that can be compared with experimental measurements. Third, I discuss the formation of the spindle in a dividing cell, which is a fundamental aspect of molecular biology. Experiments documenting a condensed protein phase on growing microtubules are reported, followed by the appearance of the Rayleigh-Plateau instability, which produces discrete droplets along a microtubule: the drops drive branching nucleation, which is an important mechanism for the developing spindle.
    *The research described was performed by many people in my research group, as well as some external collaborations.

    Biography: Howard Stone received the B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from UC Davis in 1982 and the PhD in Chemical Engineering from Caltech in 1988. Following a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Cambridge, in 1989 Howard joined the faculty of the (now) School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University, where he eventually became the Vicky Joseph Professor of Engineering and Applied Mathematics. In July 2009 Howard moved to Princeton University where he is Donald R. Dixon 1969 and Elizabeth W. Dixon Professor in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

    Professor Stone's research interests are in fluid dynamics, especially as they arise in research and applications at the interface of engineering, chemistry, physics, and biology. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), and is past Chair of the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the APS. Currently he is on the editorial or advisory boards of Physical Review Fluids, Langmuir, and Soft Matter, and is co-editor of the Soft Matter Book Series. He is the first recipient of the G.K. Batchelor Prize in Fluid Dynamics (2008) and in 2016 recipient of the Fluid Dynamics Prize of the APS. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2009, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011, the National Academy of Sciences in 2014, the Royal Society (United Kingdom) as a Foreign Member in 2022, and the American Philosophical Society in 2022.

    Host: AME Department

    Location: Ronald Tutor Campus Center (TCC) - 350 (Franklin Suite)

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Tessa Yao

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  • PhD Thesis Proposal - Kushal Chawla

    Wed, Aug 30, 2023 @ 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

    Thomas Lord Department of Computer Science

    University Calendar


    PhD Thesis Proposal - Kushal Chawla

    Committee Members: Gale Lucas (Chair), Jonathan Gratch, Jonathan May, Peter Kim, Maja Mataric

    Title: Computational Foundations for Mixed Motive Human Machine Dialogue

    Abstract: Success in a mixed motive interaction demands a balance between self serving and other serving behaviors. For instance, in a typical negotiation, a player must balance maximizing their own goals with the goals of their partner so as to come to an agreement. If the player asks for too much, this can push the partner to walk away without an agreement, hence, hurting the outcomes for all the parties involved. Such interactions are ubiquitous in everyday life, from deciding who performs household chores to customer support and high stake business deals. Consequently, AI tools capable of comprehending and participating in such mixed motive or other social influence interactions such as argumentation or therapy find broad applications in pedagogy and conversational AI.

    In this thesis, we present our foundational work for enabling mixed motive human machine dialogue. I will discuss our progress in three key areas. 1.The design of a novel task and dataset of grounded human human negotiations that has fueled our investigations into the impact of emotion expression and linguistic strategies, 2.Techniques for end to end dialogue systems for mixed motive interactions that learn to strike a balance between self and partner interests, and 3.Promoting a research community for dedicated efforts and discussion in this area

    Location: Henry Salvatori Computer Science Center (SAL) - 213

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Melissa Ochoa

    Event Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/98290954709?pwd=NndMZ0VlbkJ4L25lVllLYTZZbWgvQT09

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  • Tinker the Robot - Job/Volunteer Info Session

    Wed, Aug 30, 2023 @ 06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Tinker the Robot's mission is to ignite and cultivate a passion for science and engineering among the next generation of scientists and engineers, specifically targeting kids K-8 (elementary/middle school). Tinker the Robot is currently looking for passionate and energetic individuals who are either engineers, engineers-in-training, makers/DIYers, or creators to join the team. The teaching sessions will primarily take place after school hours, starting from 3 pm and onwards, in the central/south central Los Angeles area. Please note, this is not an on-campus job opportunity. This is a job/volunteer opportunity with a community partner.

    Location: Online Event

    Audiences:

    Contact: Noe Mora

    Event Link: https://engage.usc.edu/viterbi/rsvp?id=389952

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  • PhD Dissertation Defense - Baskin B. Senbaslar

    Thu, Aug 31, 2023 @ 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM

    Thomas Lord Department of Computer Science

    University Calendar


    PhD Dissertation Defense - Baskin B. Senbaslar

    Committee Members: Gaurav S. Sukhatme (Chair), Sven Koenig, Satish Kumar Thittamaranahalli, Mihailo R. Jovanovic

    Title: Decentralized Real Time Trajectory Planning For Multi Robot Navigation in Cluttered Environments

    Abstract: Multi robot collision free and deadlock free navigation in cluttered environments with static and dynamic obstacles is a fundamental problem for many real world applications. Dynamic obstacles can additionally be interactive, i.e., changing their behaviors depending on the behaviors of other objects. We focus on decision making algorithms, with a particular emphasis on decentralized real time trajectory planning, to enable multi robot navigation in such environments.
    Practicality of the developed approaches is a central focus of ours, such that we design our systems and algorithms under assumptions that can be realized in the real world. Central concerns of our treatment are embracing on board compute, memory, and storage limitations of robotic systems, not relying on communication for safe operation, and explicitly account for communication imperfections, allowing navigation with imperfect a priori knowledge, embracing controller trajectory tracking errors and accounting for them, working with minimal sensing and estimation capabilities, and achieving highly reactive collision avoidance behavior.

    We introduce i. two decentralized real time multi robot trajectory planning algorithms to allow static obstacle, interactive dynamic obstacle, and teammate avoidance, ii. a constraint generation, overconstraining, and constraint discarding scheme to ensure inter robot collision avoidance under asynchronous planning that is inherent in decentralized systems, which we use within one of the proposed planners, and iii. a multi robot aware planning and control stack that allows collision free and deadlock free navigation in diverse types of environments, which combines three qualitatively different decision making approaches in a hierarchical manner.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 406

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Melissa Ochoa

    Event Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/94985203072?pwd=Y3h6OTJIY244RU1LYlhlR0JFa3dMZz09

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  • NL Seminar - Phishing Emails, Improvised Explosive Devices and Quantum: A Natural Language Understanding Perspective

    Thu, Aug 31, 2023 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Information Sciences Institute

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Mitch Mithun, USC/ISI

    Talk Title: Phishing Emails, Improvised Explosive Devices and Quantum: A Natural Language Understanding Perspective

    Series: NL Seminar

    Abstract: REMINDER:

    Meeting hosts only admit guests that they know to the Zoom meeting. Hence, you are highly encouraged to use your USC account to sign into Zoom.

    If you are an outside visitor, please inform us at nlg DASH seminar DASH host AT isi DOT edu beforehand so we will be aware of your attendance and let you in.

    In this talk Mitch will present 3 projects he worked on in the past year as part of his post doctoral tenure at ISI. In the first project Mitch will explore his findings and discoveries in an effort to answer the question Why do humans still fall prey sometimes to Phishing emails. Specifically, he will talk about the recent collaborative effort between experts in cyber security and natural language processing in exploring several subtle signals typically found in phishing emails which fool humans and or AI models. He will also present a comparative analysis of performance between humans and AI models on these signals, providing insight into the learning ability of both.

    In the second part, Mitch will present his work on how to explain and ground the predictions of Large Language Models from a schema curation perspective. Large Language Models are extremely adept at predicting a novel future event or missing events from a given set of events in a complex event. For example, if you ask Chat GPT to predict what are the key events that happen when an Improvised Explosive Device attack occurs, it will start with A person buys huge amount of Ammonium Nitrate as the first event. However how is this result explainable (and verifiable) by human intuition, given that the training data and or the training process of these LLMs are not publicly available?

    In the third part, Mitch will present his work on using Quantum Natural Language Processing QNLP in low resource settings. QNLP is a very nascent field which deals with using quantum computers to solve natural language processing problems. QNLP these models are different than neural network-based models, including GPT, because they incorporate compositionality aka grammar fundamentally, while neural network based models rely on learning context through a bag of words approach. He will show that this advantage of QNLP models is more pronounced in few shot learning settings where the data to be trained on is very low.


    Biography: Mitch was a post doctoral researcher at ISI where he was working with Marjorie Freedman and Ralph Weischedel in the networking and cyber security division. Mitch, graduated from his PhD from University of Arizona, along with his Masters in Computer Science, before joining ISI as a postdoc. Before that, he worked in the software industry for 10 plus years as a product manager in a research lab. He also has a master degree in Physics from Birla Institute of Technology and Science BITS, Pilani, India. His research interests include natural language processing, cyber security and quantum computation.

    Host: Jon May and Justin Cho

    More Info: https://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

    Webcast: https://youtu.be/xPrATNWf-8E

    Location: Information Science Institute (ISI) - Virtual and ISI-Conf Rm#689

    WebCast Link: https://youtu.be/xPrATNWf-8E

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Pete Zamar

    Event Link: https://nlg.isi.edu/nl-seminar/

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  • Repeating EventCommunications Hub: Writing and Speaking for PhD Students - Drop In Hours

    Fri, Sep 01, 2023 @ 10:00 AM - 01:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Student Affairs

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Viterbi Ph.D. Students!
    Need help with academic and professional writing and speaking tasks? Viterbi faculty at the Hub provide one-on-one help with journal and conference articles, dissertations, fellowship applications, and career communications!
    Drop by RTH 222A on MWF 10am-1pm or make an online appointment via email at eishub@usc.edu.

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 222A

    Audiences: Graduate

    View All Dates

    Contact: Helen Choi

    Event Link: https://sites.google.com/usc.edu/eishub/home

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  • Alfred E. Mann Department of Biomedical Engineering

    Fri, Sep 01, 2023 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Alfred E. Mann Department of Biomedical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Donny W. Suh, MD, University of California, Irvine, UCI

    Talk Title: An Update to Biomechanical and Biochemical Principles of Retinal Hemorrhage in Abusive Head Trauma and Other forms of Trauma

    Abstract: Our investigation delves into the occurrence of retinal hemorrhages (RH) in pediatric cases stemming from diverse traumatic sources, employing both animal ocular specimens and a computational ocular model. The primary focus is to discern stress distribution patterns arising from linear and angular accelerations, as well as simulate the repetitive shaking experienced by infants. Sclerotomy apertures were meticulously created in the eyes of sheep and primates to expose the retinal tissue, facilitating the measurement of requisite tension stress for retinal separation via nanofiber manipulation. Additionally, a finite element model simulating the pediatric ocular structure was utilized to anticipate tension stress levels during instances of shaking simulating abusive head trauma. Our observations demonstrated that RH can manifest at stress magnitudes akin to those observed in animal eye experimentation during episodes of multiple shaking. Particularly, angular acceleration is implicated in generating concentrated and robust stress gradients along the retinal vasculature, while linear acceleration elicits comparatively milder and more diffused stress patterns towards the posterior ocular pole. Furthermore, employing a multicenter dataset featuring RH images of varying etiologies, we developed an artificial intelligence tool capable of ascertaining the underlying cause of RH. This tool holds potential to aid clinicians in determining the etiology behind cases of RH.

    Biography: DonnyW.Suh,M.D,FAAP,MBA,FACS works at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), Gavin Herbert Eye Institute and at Childrens Hospital of Orange County (CHOC). He is Professor and Chief of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Eye Mobile Program in the Department of Ophthalmology, UCI. He completed his pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus fellowship at The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and his ophthalmology residency at The Eye Institute, Medical College of Wisconsin. He received his medical doctorate from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas and his Bachelor of Arts in biochemistry from Rice University in Houston, Texas.
    Since 2000, Dr. Suh has been a volunteer faculty of the ORBIS Global Health Programs, and has traveled to South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa to provide medical and surgical services to the underserved as well as to teach the local ophthalmologists. He is also the Chairman for Membership Committee for American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)Ophthalmology Section and has been voted Best Doctor in America and America s Top Ophthalmologist since 2003 to present. He has been inducted to American Ophthalmological Society (AOS), which was founded in 1864, and have been voted Inventor of the Year in 2019 at University of Nebraska Medical Center. Recently, he was nominated and selected as the 2022 Bonnie Strickland Champion for Childrens Vision Award from National Center for Childrens Vision and Eye Health at Prevent Blindness. During his free time, he enjoys golf, traveling, and spending time with family.

    Host: Qifa Zhou

    More Info: Zoom link upon request

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 136

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Carla Stanard

    Event Link: Zoom link upon request

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