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Events for the 1st week of April

  • ECE Seminar Announcement: Accelerating Chip-Building Design Cycles for Future Generations of Computing

    Mon, Mar 28, 2022 @ 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Christopher Torng, Postdoctoral Researcher, Stanford University

    Talk Title: Accelerating Chip-Building Design Cycles for Future Generations of Computing

    Abstract: The chip building industry is a major cornerstone of the global economy. As a result, addressing the causes behind a multi-year global chip shortage is important for both near and long term futures. Unfortunately, one major challenge is that it is difficult to produce high-quality designs quickly and at low cost using traditional hardware design flows. This means that the industry wastes valuable fabrication slots learning painful design lessons rather than meeting economic demands.

    My research focuses on building new architectures, systems, and design tools to accelerate chip building design cycles for future generations of computing systems. To support this goal, my research spans across the computing stack, ranging from applications, compilers, architectures, and down to chip implementation. In this talk, I will first present a set of vertically integrated techniques (compiler, architecture, and VLSI) that significantly reduces the design effort for extremely fine-grain power control in spatial architectures. Next, I will introduce my work on a new generation of open and agile hardware flow tools that leverage modern programming language features to increase code reuse in physical design. Finally, I will discuss recent work on Amber SoC, a coarse-grained reconfigurable array designed with an end-to-end agile accelerator-compiler co-designed flow. I will conclude with my future directions in supporting chip building for the next generation of computing.

    Biography: Christopher Torng is a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. degree, M.S. degree, and B.S degree (2019, 2016, 2012) in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Cornell University. His projects target the development of architectures and tools to accelerate building chips and complex hardware systems. His tools have achieved use across multiple universities to support over ten academic tapeouts in technologies ranging from 180nm to 16nm. His activities have resulted in a selection as a Rising Star in Computer Architecture (2018) by Georgia Tech and an IEEE MICRO Top Pick from Hot Chips (2018).

    Host: Dr. Peter Beerel, pabeerel@usc.edu

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/99531222900?pwd=S1VDR2pRU2lyZ2hORmtObE1PcFh6Zz09

    Location: Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) - 248

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/99531222900?pwd=S1VDR2pRU2lyZ2hORmtObE1PcFh6Zz09

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Mayumi Thrasher

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  • CS Colloquium: Aishwarya Ganesan (VMware Research) - Consistency and Performance in Distributed Storage Systems

    Mon, Mar 28, 2022 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Aishwarya Ganesan , VMware Research

    Talk Title: Consistency and Performance in Distributed Storage Systems

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Talk abstract: Computer systems underpin every modern application that we interact with today. When designing systems, one must often tradeoff strong guarantees for performance or vice-versa. The same tradeoff exists in distributed storage systems as well; designers must often choose consistency or performance. In this talk, I will show how we can build distributed storage systems that provide strong consistency yet also perform well. My key insight to achieving this goal is to defer enforcing consistency until state is externally visible. Based on this insight, I design two novel distributed storage systems.

    First, I present Skyros, a new replication protocol that exploits storage-interface properties to defer expensive coordination. Skyros realizes that many update interfaces are nil-externalizing: they do not expose system state immediately. By taking advantage of nil-externality, Skyros offers significantly lower latencies than traditional replication protocols while still providing strong consistency.

    Second, I present consistency-aware durability (CAD), a new durability primitive that enables stronger consistency. CAD shifts the point of durability from writes to reads. By delaying writes, CAD enables high performance; however, by ensuring durability before serving reads, CAD enables the construction of stronger consistency models.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium

    Biography: Aishwarya Ganesan is a postdoctoral researcher at VMware Research. She completed her PhD from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in Computer Sciences, advised by Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau and Remzi Arpaci-Dusseau. She is broadly interested in distributed systems and storage systems. Her work has been recognized with best-paper awards at FAST 20 and FAST 18 and a best paper award nomination at FAST 17. She was selected for the Rising Stars in EECS workshop and a recipient of Facebook 2019 PhD Fellowship. She also received the graduate student instructor award for teaching graduate-level distributed systems at UW Madison.

    Host: Ramesh Govindan

    Location: online only

    Audiences: By invitation only.

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • CS Colloquium: Souti Chattopadhyay (Oregon State University) - When cognition works against us! Transforming Software to reduce the cost of cognitive processes.

    Mon, Mar 28, 2022 @ 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Souti Chattopadhyay, Oregon State University

    Talk Title: When cognition works against us! Transforming Software to reduce the cost of cognitive processes.

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: 86 billion neurons make up our brains! Naturally, these 100 trillion neural connections give rise to a complex process of making decisions, interpreting information, and taking intended actions. This is especially true when programming, whether to build software systems or analyze data. Cognitive processes like selective interpretation and biases affect these programming decisions and actions frequently and significantly. In a recent study, we found that biases are associated with 45.7% of actions that developers take (like editing a line or navigating to a part of code). Eventually, developers reversed or undid 70% of the actions associated with biases which made up 25% of their entire worktime [1]. Similarly, data scientists report spending a lot of time in a "tortuous, multi-step adventure" for getting the data set up for analysis based on familiarity and preferences [2]. Programmers pay the necessary price of being human when working with tools without support for the negative impacts of cognitive processes. In this talk, I will present findings on how some cognitive processes affect programming. To reduce the friction between software and cognition, we will discuss how to design tools to be vigilant and provide desired support using automated and empirical approaches.


    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium


    Biography: Souti Chattopadhyay (Rini) is a Ph.D. candidate at Oregon State University in the Department of EECS. She works at the intersection of Human-Computer Interaction, Software Engineering, and Cognitive Science, focusing on assisting software engineers and data scientists.

    Her research is on human-centered tools and interfaces that align with the human cognitive processes when solving problems. Her work is focused on understanding how humans make decisions when interacting with interfaces, specifically programming interfaces. She studies developers, data scientists, and end-user programmers to identify the process behind their technical decisions and social interactions.

    During her internship at Microsoft Research, she worked on a project related to the next generation of developers, specifically how they express their identity on social media platforms like YouTube. Some of her works were awarded best papers and honorable mentions by ACM and IEEE, including understanding cognitive biases in programmers and exploring a plethora of challenges data scientists face. Her work on cognitive biases was also recognized as research highlights by CACM and that on data scientists was featured on Nature articles.


    Host: Chao Wang

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 105

    Audiences: By invitation only.

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. Dissertation

    Mon, Mar 28, 2022 @ 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Maria Morvillo, Ph.D. Candidate, Viterbi School of Engineering- Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Talk Title: Reproducible and Rapid Computational Approaches for Assessing Contamination in Natural Aquifers

    Abstract: The ubiquitous presence of multi-scale heterogeneity in hydrological properties is the cause of complex subsurface flow patterns that impact the transport behavior of a solute plume. Fluctuations in the velocity field lead to increased solute spreading which enhances mass transfer mechanisms and impact solute arrival times. This thesis proposes a series of methods which accounts for the effects of aquifer heterogeneity on transport observables which are essential for risk analysis, performance assessment of waste disposal facilities and the selection of optimal remediation cleanup strategies. The approaches proposed in this dissertation are computationally rapid and reproducible. The first contribution of this thesis consists of the development of a novel aquifer connectivity-ranked Monte Carlo method that accelerates the statistical convergence of the statistics of the first arrival times of a solute body in an environmentally sensitive location. Secondly, I propose an innovative kernel-based reactive random walk particle tracking method to improve the computational efficiency associated with reactive transport in spatially variable groundwater flows. Finally, we present a computational package that links the various components relevant for the estimation of the concentration of a pollutant at an environmentally sensitive target and its uncertainty to support decision making in risk analysis.



    Host: Advisor, Dr. Felipe de Barros

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/96445541938

    Location: Zoom Meeting

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Evangeline Reyes

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  • GRIDS Alumni Industry Panel

    Mon, Mar 28, 2022 @ 07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Student Activity


    Join us on Monday, March 28 at 7PM for the GRIDS Alumni Industry Panel! Hear from Haripriya Dharmsala (Software Engineer at Boeing), Seun Deleawe (Senior Data Engineer at MyDataProduct), and Iris Liu (System Devops Engineer at NVIDIA), and get an inside peek at the recruitment process, the first couple years on the job, and shifting jobs post-grad.

    Date: Monday, March 28
    Time: 7PM
    Location: SLH 100 (Stauffer Science Lecture Hall)

    Sign up here, so we can get an estimated headcount!
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScY2rasv-sGDReJt16FJWSBC_ejpyh3ajzhPKXWQc2LyXOaqw/viewform

    More Information: gridsevent.png

    Location: John Stauffer Science Lecture Hall (SLH) - 100

    Audiences: Graduate

    Contact: GRIDS

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  • CS Colloquium: Lingjie Liu (Max Planck Institute for Informatics) - Neural Representation and Rendering of 3D Real-world Scenes

    Tue, Mar 29, 2022 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Lingjie Liu , Max Planck Institute for Informatics

    Talk Title: Neural Representation and Rendering of 3D Real-world Scenes

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: High-quality reconstruction and photo-realistic rendering of real-world scenes are two important tasks that have a wide range of applications in AR/VR, movie production, games, and robotics. These tasks are challenging because real-world scenes contain complex phenomena, such as occlusions, motions and interactions. Approaching these tasks using classical computer graphics techniques is a highly difficult and time-consuming process, which requires complicated capture procedures, manual intervention, and a sophisticated global illumination rendering process. In this talk, I will introduce our recent work that integrates deep learning techniques into the classical graphics pipeline for modelling humans and static scenes in an automatic way. Specifically, I will talk about creating photo-realistic animatable human characters from only RGB videos, high-quality reconstruction and fast novel view synthesis of general static scenes from RGB image inputs, and scene generation with a 3D generative model. Finally, I will discuss challenges and opportunities in this area for future work.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium

    Biography: Lingjie Liu is Lise Meitner Postdoctoral Research Fellow working with Prof. Christian Theobalt in the Visual Computing and AI Department at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics. She received her Ph.D. degree at the University of Hong Kong in 2019. Before that, she got her B.Sc. degree in Computer Science at Huazhong University of Science and Technology in 2014. Her research interests include neural scene representations, neural rendering, human performance modeling and capture, and 3D reconstruction. Webpage: https://lingjie0206.github.io/.

    Host: Jernej Barbic

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    Audiences: By invitation only.

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Repeating EventVirtual First-Year Admission Information Session

    Tue, Mar 29, 2022 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Our virtual information session is a live presentation from a USC Viterbi admission counselor designed for high school students and their family members to learn more about the USC Viterbi undergraduate experience. Our session will cover an overview of our undergraduate engineering programs, the application process, and more on student life. Guests will be able to ask questions and engage in further discussion toward the end of the session.

    Register Here!



    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    View All Dates

    Contact: Viterbi Admission

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  • CS Colloquium: Roopsha Samanta (Purdue University) - Semantics-Guided Inductive Program Synthesis

    Tue, Mar 29, 2022 @ 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Roopsha Samanta, Purdue University

    Talk Title: Semantics-Guided Inductive Program Synthesis

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: The dream of program synthesis seeks to automatically develop programs that conform to a user's intent. Classically, program synthesis has been framed as a problem of generation of correct-by-construction programs from complete, formal specifications of their expected behavior. An increasingly promising and more tractable paradigm of program synthesis, however, is inductive program synthesis. Broadly construed, inductive program synthesis can be framed as a problem of program discovery from partial specifications such as input-output examples, program traces, and natural language descriptions. While the last decade has witnessed several breakthroughs in improving the scalability and applicability of inductive program synthesis, the true potential of this synthesis paradigm remains to be unleashed.

    In this talk, I will describe my group's ongoing endeavors to advance the frontiers of inductive program synthesis. Further, I will emphasize the need to tackle a fundamental, yet often neglected, challenge of inductive synthesis-”reliability. Because inductive synthesizers generalize from partial observations, they often suffer from overfitting, ambiguity, and brittleness-”the synthesized program may indeed conform to its partial specification, but it may not exhibit the intended behavior on all inputs. I will present my group's novel semantics-guided approach-”based on surprising notions of program semantics-”to improve the reliability of inductive program synthesis.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium


    Biography: Roopsha Samanta is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Purdue University. Before joining Purdue in 2016, she completed her PhD at UT Austin in 2013, advised by E. Allen Emerson and Vijay K. Garg, and was a postdoctoral researcher at IST Austria from 2014-2016 with Thomas A. Henzinger. She is a recipient of 2019 NSF CAREER award and 2021 Amazon Research Award. Roopsha's research seeks to help programmers write programs that conform to their intent. She develop tools and techniques for algorithmic program verification, synthesis, and repair for a spectrum of application domains, correctness specifications, and programmer expertise. Her current research agenda is centered around two themes-”semantics-guided inductive program synthesis and repair and modular, bounded verification of unbounded distributed systems

    Host: Mukund Raghothaman

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 105

    Audiences: By invitation only.

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • CS Colloquium: Marco Pavone (Stanford University) - Towards safe, data-driven autonomy

    Tue, Mar 29, 2022 @ 02:30 PM - 03:50 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Marco Pavone, Stanford University

    Talk Title: Towards safe, data-driven autonomy

    Series: Computer Science Colloquium

    Abstract: *New time: 2:30 - 3:50 PM PT*

    AI-powered autonomous vehicles that can learn, reason, and interact with people are no longer science fiction. Self-driving cars, unmanned aerial vehicles, and autonomous spacecraft, among others, are continually increasing in capability and seeing incremental deployment in more and more domains. However, fundamental research questions still need to be addressed in order to achieve full and widespread vehicle autonomy. In this talk, I will discuss our work on addressing key open problems in the field of vehicle autonomy, particularly in pursuit of safe, data-driven autonomy stacks. Specifically, I will discuss (1) robust human prediction models for both simulation and real-time decision making, (2) AI safety frameworks for autonomous systems, and (3) novel, highly integrated autonomy architectures that are amenable to end-to-end training while retaining a modular, interpretable structure. The discussion will be grounded in autonomous driving and aerospace robotics applications.

    **Dr. Marco Pavone will give his talk in person at SGM 124 and we will also host the talk over Zoom.**

    Register in advance for this webinar at:

    https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_tR3q2DuTRwulhaNsexKXAw

    After registering, attendees will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium.


    Biography: Dr. Marco Pavone is an Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, where he is the Director of the Autonomous Systems Laboratory and Co-Director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford. He is currently on a partial leave of absence at NVIDIA serving as Director of Autonomous Vehicle Research. Before joining Stanford, he was a Research Technologist within the Robotics Section at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received a Ph.D. degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2010. His main research interests are in the development of methodologies for the analysis, design, and control of autonomous systems, with an emphasis on self-driving cars, autonomous aerospace vehicles, and future mobility systems. He is a recipient of a number of awards, including a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from President Barack Obama, an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, a National Science Foundation Early Career (CAREER) Award, a NASA Early Career Faculty Award, and an Early-Career Spotlight Award from the Robotics Science and Systems Foundation. He was identified by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) as one of America's 20 most highly promising investigators under the age of 40.


    Host: Stefanos Nikolaidis

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_tR3q2DuTRwulhaNsexKXAw

    Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) - 124

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_tR3q2DuTRwulhaNsexKXAw

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Computer Science Department

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  • ISE 651 Epstein Seminar

    Tue, Mar 29, 2022 @ 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM

    Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Ignacio Grossmann, R.R. Dean University Professor, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon

    Talk Title: Global Optimization of Nonconvex Nonlinear Generalized Disjunctive Programs

    Host: Dr. Phebe Vayanos

    More Information: March 29, 2022.pdf

    Location: Online/Zoom

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Grace Owh

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  • Mork Family Department Seminar - Julie Rorrer

    Tue, Mar 29, 2022 @ 04:00 PM - 05:20 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Julie Rorrer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Talk Title: From Trash to Treasure: Advancing the Catalytic Upcycling of Waste Plastics and Renewable Feedstocks

    Host: Professor A.Hodge

    Location: Social Sciences Building (SOS) - B46

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Heather Alexander

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  • Repeating EventCS Undergraduate Web Registration Live Chat Assistance

    Wed, Mar 30, 2022 @ 09:00 AM - 09:30 AM

    Computer Science

    Student Activity


    If you are a CS undergraduate with a web registration permit time of 9am today and are having difficulty with web registration, the advisement staff will be available from 9:00am - 9:30am to help troubleshoot your registration questions and issues. Chat with us at https://www.cs.usc.edu/chat/

    Audiences: Undergrad

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    Contact: USC Computer Science

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  • CS Colloquium: Nengkun Yu (University of Technology Sydney) - Efficient verification and testing of quantum programs

    Wed, Mar 30, 2022 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Nengkun Yu , University of Technology Sydney

    Talk Title: Efficient verification and testing of quantum programs

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: Quantum can solve complex problems that classical computers will never be able to. In recent years, significant efforts have been devoted to building quantum computers to solve real-world problems. To ensure the correctness of quantum programs, we develop verification techniques and testing algorithms for quantum programs. In the first part of this talk, I will overview efficient reasoning about quantum programs by developing verification techniques and tools that leverage the power of Birkhoff & von Neumann quantum logic. In the second part, I will review my work on quantum state tomography, i.e., learning the classical description of quantum states, which closes a long-standing gap between the upper and lower bounds for dynamic testing the properties of a quantum program's output.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium

    Biography: Nengkun Yu is an associate professor in the Centre for Quantum Software and Information, the University of Technology Sydney. He received his B.S. and PhD degrees from the Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in July of 2008 and 2013. He won a distinguished paper award at OOPSLA 2020 and a distinguished paper award at PLDI 2021. His research interest focuses on quantum computing.


    Host: Todd Brun / Jyo Deshmukh

    Location: online only

    Audiences: By invitation only.

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Center of Autonomy and AI, Center for Cyber-Physical Systems and the Internet of Things, and Ming Hsieh Institute Seminar Series

    Wed, Mar 30, 2022 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Nir Piterman, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

    Talk Title: Synthesis From Temporal Specifications

    Series: Center for Cyber-Physical Systems and Internet of Things

    Abstract: In this talk I will present the GR[1] approach to synthesis, the automatic production of designs from their temporal logic specifications. We are interested in reactive systems, systems that continuously interact with other programs, users, or their environment and specifications in linear temporal logic. Classical solutions to synthesis use either two player games or tree automata. I will give a short introduction to the technique of using two player games for synthesis.

    The classical solution to synthesis requires the usage of deterministic automata. This solution is 2EXPTIME-complete, is quite complicated, and does not work well in practice. I will present a syntactic approach that restricts the kind of properties users are allowed to write. It turns out that this approach is general enough and can be extended to cover many properties written in practice.

    Time permitting, I will present results that support the usage of synthesis in model-driven development and robot control.


    Biography: Nir Piterman is a professor of computer science at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. Before that he was an associate professor at the University of Leicester, held postdoctoral research positions at Imperial College London and the Ecole Polytechnique Federal de Lausanne, and completed his PhD at the Weizmann Institute of Science. His research interests include formal verification and automata theory. Particularly, he has worked on model checking, temporal logic, reactive synthesis, and game solving. His current research is funded by the European Research Council (ERC), the Swedish Research Council (VR), and the Wallenberg Autonomous Systems Program (WASP(. He is currently the editor in chief of the journal Formal Methods in System Design.

    Host: Pierluigi Nuzzo, nuzzo@usc.edu

    Location: Online

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Talyia White

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  • Computer Science General Faculty Meeting

    Wed, Mar 30, 2022 @ 12:00 PM - 02:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Receptions & Special Events


    Bi-Weekly regular faculty meeting for invited full-time Computer Science faculty only. Event details emailed directly to attendees.

    Location: TBD

    Audiences: Invited Faculty Only

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Robinhood - CodeSignal Workshop (Virtual)

    Wed, Mar 30, 2022 @ 12:00 PM - 01:30 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Robinhood - CodeSignal Workshop (Virtual)

    Wednesday, March 30, 2022
    12pm - 1:30pm

    Sign up link HERE: https://ripplematch.com/t/6e5dd80d

    Robinhood is on a mission to democratize finance for all. In order to make that mission a reality, we hire great talent from varied educational backgrounds. At Robinhood, we leverage CodeSignal during the initial interview process which hosts a general coding assessment that measures the following skills: coding, implementation, problem solving and speed. With this in mind, we are offering CS students help during the interview process, primarily focused on the technical take-home assessment.
    Robinhood's University Recruiting team is hosting a "CodeSignal Workshop" on Wednesday, March 30th from 12:00pm - 1:30pm PT. In the first 30 minutes of the session, we will review CodeSignal's assessment process, answer questions around how to best navigate the take home portion, and give tips on getting the best possible score. The final hour will consist of breakout sessions, where Robinhood engineers will demonstrate how to best solve the most missed tasks on the assessment.

    This event will be hosted on Zoom where you will be able to chat and ask any questions you have with the speakers and other attendees. Please RSVP and expect to receive the event link 15 minutes prior to the event.

    Schedule (all times in PT):
    1:00pm - Welcome
    1:05pm - CodeSignal Assessment Process
    1:30pm - Breakout Session with Robinhood Engineers

    We are looking forward to seeing you then!



    External employer-hosted events and activities are not affiliated with the USC Viterbi Career Connections Office. They are posted on Viterbi Career Connections because they may be of interest to members of the Viterbi community. Inclusion of any activity does not indicate USC sponsorship or endorsement of that activity or event. It is the participant's responsibility to apply due diligence, exercise caution when participating, and report concerns to vcareers@usc.edu

    Location: Virtual (via Zoom)

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • AME Seminar

    Wed, Mar 30, 2022 @ 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Shawn Shadden, University of California, Berkeley

    Talk Title: Computational models of cardiovascular function

    Abstract: Combining medical imaging and other forms of clinical data with first principles-, phenomenological- and/or statistical-based computational modeling has become an important avenue in cardiovascular research, including for disease diagnosis, treatment planning and scientific discovery. In this talk, I will provide some background on the field of computational modeling of cardiovascular biomechanics and will discuss some of our recent work focused on methods to improve personalization and efficiency of this modeling process. Namely, I will discuss developments on machine learning approaches to facilitate image-based model construction and parameterization, some of our work on reduced order modeling to facilitate efficient computation of common physical quantities of clinical importance, and where we might be headed.

    Biography: Shawn Shadden is a Professor and Vice Chair of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and a core member of the UCSF-UC Berkeley Graduate Program in Bioengineering. His research focuses on the computational modeling of cardiovascular biomechanics and the advancement of theoretical and numerical methods to quantify complex fluid flow. He is recipient of an NSF CAREER Award, a Bakar Faculty Fellow Award, Hellman Faculty Fellow Award, and the American Heart Association Established Investigator Award. His lab helps develop the SimVascular software platform, which is broadly used in the field of computational cardiovascular research.

    Host: AME Department

    More Info: https://usc.zoom.us/j/93987337017?pwd=MWd2dXBSL1FaR1RPaHNscjJ1NW80UT09

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/93987337017?pwd=MWd2dXBSL1FaR1RPaHNscjJ1NW80UT09

    Location: James H. Zumberge Hall Of Science (ZHS) - 252

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/93987337017?pwd=MWd2dXBSL1FaR1RPaHNscjJ1NW80UT09

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Tessa Yao

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  • A Study Break w/ Tesla: Weekly Series Feb 9 - April 13 (Virtual)

    Wed, Mar 30, 2022 @ 06:00 PM - 06:45 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    A Study Break w/ Tesla is a series of professional workshops presented by the Hardware + Cell Engineering Internship Recruiting Team that will be offered on Wednesday evenings from February through April, 6:00 pm -6:45 pm.
    Each event will offer a 25-minute presentation on a specific topic, followed by a 20-minute opportunity for participants to ask questions and network with the Tesla team.
    Event: Identity in the Workplace | March 30 - RSVP HERE
    Description: This session will discuss the value of diversity, equity, and inclusion across the organization from resources available for interns to an introduction of the various affinity groups and social experiences.
    External employer-hosted events and activities are not affiliated with the USC Career Center. They are posted on Viterbi Career Connections because they may be of interest to members of the Viterbi community. Inclusion of any activity does not indicate USC sponsorship or endorsement of that activity or event. It is the participant's responsibility to apply due diligence, exercise caution when participating, and report concerns to vcareers@usc.edu

    Location: RSVP in Viterbi Career Gateway

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Welcome to Working in the Metaverse (Virtual)

    Wed, Mar 30, 2022 @ 06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Learn more about AR, VR, MR, XR and Metaverse etc. and the emerging opportunities in this multidisciplinary field for all majors.
    Register in advance here: https://usc.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEvc--qqzgrH9TH36OGuYjb5v-wRiw2jGO0%20
    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
    External employer-hosted events and activities are not affiliated with the USC Career Center. They are posted on Viterbi Career Connections because they may be of interest to members of the Viterbi community. Inclusion of any activity does not indicate USC sponsorship or endorsement of that activity or event. It is the participant's responsibility to apply due diligence, exercise caution when participating, and report concerns to vcareers@usc.edu

    Location: Virtual (via Zoom) https://usc.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEvc--qqzgrH9TH36OGuYjb5v-wRiw2jGO0%20

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Repeating EventCS Undergraduate Web Registration Live Chat Assistance

    Thu, Mar 31, 2022 @ 09:00 AM - 09:30 AM

    Computer Science

    Student Activity


    If you are a CS undergraduate with a web registration permit time of 9am today and are having difficulty with web registration, the advisement staff will be available from 9:00am - 9:30am to help troubleshoot your registration questions and issues. Chat with us at https://www.cs.usc.edu/chat/

    Audiences: Undergrad

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    Contact: USC Computer Science

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  • 16th Annual Mork Family Department Student Research Symposium

    Thu, Mar 31, 2022 @ 09:30 AM - 03:30 PM

    Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    Receptions & Special Events


    Location: Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience (MCB) - 1st Floor

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Karen Woo/Mork Family

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  • CS Colloquium: Weihang Wang (State University of New York at Buffalo) - Understanding WebAssembly via Program Transformation

    Thu, Mar 31, 2022 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Computer Science

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Weihang Wang , State University of New York at Buffalo

    Talk Title: Understanding WebAssembly via Program Transformation

    Series: CS Colloquium

    Abstract: WebAssembly is the newest language for the web, aiming to enable high-performance applications and provide languages such as C/C++ a compilation target so that they can be run on the web. WebAssembly defines a portable binary instruction set, as well as a corresponding textual assembly format. However, WebAssembly's syntax is difficult to interpret for human readers because of the stack machine-based implementation. As a result, distributed third-party WebAssembly modules need to be implicitly trusted by developers as verifying the functionality requires significant effort.

    In this talk, I will describe my work towards building analysis tools for developers to understand WebAssembly programs. The first section of the talk will focus on identifying limitations of current analysis tools: I will introduce a code obfuscation technique for obfuscating JavaScript malware by translating parts of the computation into WebAssembly. By pinpointing limitations of current malware detectors, my work motivates future efforts on detecting multi-language malware on the web that uses WebAssembly. The second section of the talk will focus on a set of abstraction rules for WebAssembly instructions, which can be used to lift WebAssembly to a high-level representation that abstracts the underlying semantics of the code. I have applied the abstraction rules in detecting WebAssembly-based cryptomining malware. My detection relies on program semantics unique to cryptomining, which is resilient to variants.

    This lecture satisfies requirements for CSCI 591: Research Colloquium


    Biography: Weihang Wang is an Assistant Professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo. She received her Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from Purdue University in 2018. Weihang's interests are in Software Engineering, with a focus on building tools for improving the reliability and security of software systems. She was awarded an NSF CAREER Award in 2021, a Facebook Testing and Verification Research Award in 2019, a Mozilla Research Award in 2019, and a Maurice H. Halstead Memorial Research Award in 2018.

    Host: Chao Wang

    Location: Olin Hall of Engineering (OHE) - 132

    Audiences: By invitation only.

    Contact: Assistant to CS chair

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  • Repeating EventVirtual First-Year Admission Information Session

    Thu, Mar 31, 2022 @ 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Undergraduate Admission

    Workshops & Infosessions


    Our virtual information session is a live presentation from a USC Viterbi admission counselor designed for high school students and their family members to learn more about the USC Viterbi undergraduate experience. Our session will cover an overview of our undergraduate engineering programs, the application process, and more on student life. Guests will be able to ask questions and engage in further discussion toward the end of the session.

    Register Here!



    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

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    Contact: Viterbi Admission

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  • Astani Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar

    Thu, Mar 31, 2022 @ 12:30 PM - 01:30 PM

    Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Speaker: Dr. Michael Shields, John Hopkins University

    Talk Title: Manifold Learning for High Dimensional Uncertainty Quantification

    Abstract:
    Uncertainty Quantification (UQ), the systematic and rigorous accounting of uncertainties, has become widely accepted as an essential component of any proper scientific investigation -“ whether computational, experimental, or otherwise. In computational science and engineering, as well as in experimental investigations, we often encounter problems that are parameterized by very high-dimensional quantities and/or result in very high-dimensional quantities of interest. Thanks to the curse of dimensionality, the challenge of solving these problems grows exponentially with the problem dimensions. This explosive growth in complexity has been widely known for decades and may never be truly resolved. However, all hope is not lost. In this presentation, we offer some strategies for addressing high dimensional UQ problems whose uncertainties can be expressed in lower-dimensional latent spaces or on manifolds whose geometry is not necessarily Euclidean. We begin by introducing some concepts in Reimannian geometry and nonlinear dimension reduction, specifically reviewing Grassmann manifolds and diffusion maps, and show how UQ problems with high dimensional solutions can be solved by projecting solution snapshots onto the Grassmann manifold, performing diffusion maps on the manifold, and constructing surrogate models on the resulting low-dimensional space using standard machine learning methods such as Gaussian process regression, polynomial chaos expansions (PCE), or deep neural networks. Next, we consider problems with very high dimensional inputs and present a survey of 13 different unsupervised learning methods for dimension reduction, which are used to identify low-dimensional latent spaces on which PCE surrogates are constructed. Some takeaways from this general approach, termed manifold-PCE, are presented. Finally, we bring the two components together to propose a general framework for UQ in high dimensions that is widely applicable and very flexible.




    Biography: Michael D. Shields is an Associate Professor in the Dept. of Civil & Systems Engineering at Johns Hopkins University and holds a secondary appointment in the Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Prof. Shields conducts methodological research in uncertainty quantification and stochastic simulation for problems in mechanics, materials science, and physics with applications ranging from multi-scale material modeling to assessing the reliability and safety of large-scale structures. He received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics from Columbia University in 2010, after which he was employed as a Research Engineer in applied computational mechanics at Weidlinger Associates, Inc. He joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins in 2013. For his work in UQ, Prof. Shields has been awarded the ONR Young Investigator Award, the NSF CAREER Award, the DOE Early Career Award, and the Johns Hopkins University Catalyst Award. Prof. Shields and his group also develop the open-source UQpy (Uncertainty Quantification with Python) software, which is a general toolbox for UQ in computational, mathematical, and physical systems.


    Host: Dr. Roger Ghanem

    Webcast: https://usc.zoom.us/j/91873923659 Meeting ID: 918 7392 3659 Pass: 975701

    Location: Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering (RTH) - 526

    WebCast Link: https://usc.zoom.us/j/91873923659 Meeting ID: 918 7392 3659 Pass: 975701

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: Evangeline Reyes

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  • McKinsey & Company Info Session, hosted by Affinity Networks (Virtual)

    Thu, Mar 31, 2022 @ 07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Conferences, Lectures, & Seminars


    Abstract: Our global All In, Diversity & Inclusion initiatives engage colleagues around the world to develop and share innovative ways of working that advance inclusivity. To ensure diversity in gender, ethnicity, background, education, orientation, etc., we constantly look for new ways to reach people who might otherwise not be considering consulting as a career option.
    For this session, we will be talking about our global culture of inclusion and our Affinity Networks, and also sharing a few details about the application process.
    Please register for the event here: https://mckinsey.avature.net/events/Rsvp/?folderId=62467
    External employer-hosted events and activities are not affiliated with the USC Viterbi Career Connections Office. They are posted on Viterbi Career Connections because they may be of interest to members of the Viterbi community. Inclusion of any activity does not indicate USC sponsorship or endorsement of that activity or event. It is the participant's responsibility to apply due diligence, exercise caution when participating, and report concerns to vcareers@usc.edu

    More Info: https://mckinsey.avature.net/events/Rsvp/?folderId=62467

    Location: RSVP in Viterbi Career Gateway

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Google Code Jam 2022 (Virtual)

    Fri, Apr 01, 2022 @ 12:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    **TO REGISTER FOR CODE JAM, PLEASE VISIT OUR SITE (goo.gle/cj2022). RSVPING TO THIS EVENT DOES NOT ENTER YOU INTO THE COMPETITION. **
    Code Jam is back for its 19th year-register today for a chance to earn the coveted title of Code Jam Champion at the World Finals and take home the grand prize of USD $15,000. Tune in here to learn what we're looking forward to this season, and find more important information below:
    The 27-hour Qualification Round begins on Friday, April 1 @ 23:00 UTC; registration will be open until the round ends. This is your one chance to collaborate while participating, as collaboration isn't permitted beyond the Qualification Round.
    Visit the schedule page to see your local timezone and add rounds to your calendar.
    We've updated our coding language offerings this season-review the FAQ here.
    You can start warming up with previous Code Jam problems and be sure to visit g.co/codejam for all other important information.
    See you on the scoreboard,
    The Code Jam Team
    External employer-hosted events and activities are not affiliated with the USC Viterbi Career Connections Office. They are posted on Viterbi Career Connections because they may be of interest to members of the Viterbi community. Inclusion of any activity does not indicate USC sponsorship or endorsement of that activity or event. It is the participant's responsibility to apply due diligence, exercise caution when participating, and report concerns to vcareers@usc.edu

    Location: Virtual

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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  • Repeating EventCS Undergraduate Web Registration Live Chat Assistance

    Fri, Apr 01, 2022 @ 09:00 AM - 09:30 AM

    Computer Science

    Student Activity


    If you are a CS undergraduate with a web registration permit time of 9am today and are having difficulty with web registration, the advisement staff will be available from 9:00am - 9:30am to help troubleshoot your registration questions and issues. Chat with us at https://www.cs.usc.edu/chat/

    Audiences: Undergrad

    View All Dates

    Contact: USC Computer Science

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  • Drop in chat with PayPal Talent Acquisition (Virtual)

    Fri, Apr 01, 2022 @ 11:00 AM - 02:00 PM

    Viterbi School of Engineering Career Connections

    Workshops & Infosessions


    An opportunity to drop in and discuss the PayPal Vision, Culture, Benefits, and Opportunities!
    Link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_M2NkY2ZhMTktOTdmNC00YTFmLTk0ZjUtMDMyNDg4ZGZhODRj%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%22fb007914-6020-4374-977e-21bac5f3f4c8%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%223add409d-8b80-46b0-bf14-2516ca04425d%22%7d
    External employer-hosted events and activities are not affiliated with the USC Viterbi Career Connections Office. They are posted on Viterbi Career Connections because they may be of interest to members of the Viterbi community. Inclusion of any activity does not indicate USC sponsorship or endorsement of that activity or event. It is the participant's responsibility to apply due diligence, exercise caution when participating, and report concerns to vcareers@usc.edu

    Location: Virtual. RSVP Link in the event description.

    Audiences: Everyone Is Invited

    Contact: RTH 218 Viterbi Career Connections

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